Engine not running

Tiny
JOETRACYJOETRACY
  • MEMBER
  • 1999 DODGE RAM
  • 8.0L
  • V10
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 135,000 MILES
I desperately need help. I have a 1999 Dodge Ram 2500 V10. Motor blew so I bought a replacement from a 1995 Dodge Ram V10. I realize the replacement is OBD1 and it has EGR valve. So I switched Intake Manifolds complete with fuel rails and throttle bodies and passenger side exhaust manifold. I also switched crank sensor and cam sensor. Once complete attempted start. Getting fuel but no fire to plugs. Pulled one plug and verified. Was told that if cam sensor was not installed correctly that damage would occur to sensor which of course would cause the no fire. Then I was told that it was more serious that I now had to remove the front of the engine in order to change something called the firing ring on the front of the camshaft that the 1995 and the 1999 used different rings. Is any of this true? Please please help clarify this for me. My truck has been down for 2-months.

If I do have to replace the firing ring on front of the camshaft, would the entire camshaft have to be removed in order to replace this part or just the front of the engine.
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Wednesday, April 5th, 2017 AT 3:23 PM

23 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
The issue is how the cam sensor was installed. A new sensor will have a thick paper spacer on the end to set the critical air gap. Some aftermarket replacements have a thin plastic rib molded on the end to set that gap. If that type is reinstalled, that rib is supposed to be cut off, then a paper spacer is stuck on to set the gap. That spacer slides off and is done doing its thing the first time the engine is cranked.

When you don't use a new spacer, and the sensor is installed too far, it's the sensor that is damaged, not the tone wheel.

I can't find a drawing of the crank sensor. All I found is it is above the oil pan, on the left side. I never replaced one on this engine, but on many other engines, that sensor is behind the right cylinder head, in the transmission's bell housing. Most of those also use the paper spacer to set the air gap. The concern with those is there is a tone ring added to the flex plate with groups of notches, or cutouts. The Engine Computer reads the resulting signal pulses to know when a piston is coming to top dead center, and in some years, to know WHICH piston is coming to top dead center. It knows that because there are different numbers of notches in each group, and those numbers are different for different years. That means you must use the flex plate that came with the truck for that year, not the flex plate that came with the engine from a different year.

In this case, the tone wheel is cast as part of the crankshaft, and the part numbers for the crankshaft is the same for both years. The only thing you need to look at is if the crankshaft position sensor's mounting bracket is slotted, you need to use a new paper spacer to set the air gap when you install it.

I can't find any reference to the tone wheel for the camshaft, so I don't know if they are the same for both years. The people at the Chrysler dealer's parts department can tell you that. If it is the same for both years, the air gap is the only thing you have to worry about. If they tell you the tone wheel is different, you'll need to switch the camshaft sprocket, which I assume has the tone wheel on it. If you have to go through all that work, it would make more sense to just install a new timing chain and sprocket set for a '99. The old sprocket has worn to match the old chain. Also, I can't say for sure both years use the same number of teeth on the sprockets. Also be aware there will be a key way or a dowel pin to set the orientation of the sprockets on their shafts, and that could be different too, between the two years.
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Wednesday, April 5th, 2017 AT 5:30 PM
Tiny
STEVE W.
  • EXPERT
The camshaft sprocket timing signals are different. They used a different sprocket on the 96-2000 engines. The lower sprocket and chain are the same. The balancer is different as well but you want to use the one that matches the engine. I seem to recall that there is a difference in the front engine covers as well but don't remember what.

You eliminated most of the other issues by swapping the intakes. Be aware that 94-96 engines have a bad reputation for cracking the heads. The casting was altered a bit in 97 to mitigate that. I did a similar repair, used a 94 block in a 97. I used the short block but replaced the cam and timing set with the 97 parts. The rest of the parts came from the 97. (It had tossed a rod)
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Thursday, April 6th, 2017 AT 5:25 AM
Tiny
JOETRACYJOETRACY
  • MEMBER
I finally bought a timing chain set. Have removed timing chain and camshaft sprocket. Having difficulties removing the crankshaft sprocket. Went to O'Reilly's auto and rented a puller. Looks identical to the harmonic balance puller, 3-jaws. I cannot seem to get the 3 jaws to hold onto the crankshaft gear. Keeps slipping off. Please can you help. I need ideas as to properly removing this gear. My truck has been down for a while now.
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Sunday, July 30th, 2017 AT 8:29 AM
Tiny
KEN
  • ADMIN
Hello,

Here is what I do. First with the puller installed the best you can fasten a large hose clamp around the jaws and secure firmly. Next take a butane/propane torch and heat the gear slightly. This will make the gear come off easily. Next, heat the new gear in the over to about 200 degrees use a glove and it should slip onto the crankshaft with little force.

Please let us know what happens.

Cheers, Ken
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Sunday, July 30th, 2017 AT 8:00 PM
Tiny
JOETRACYJOETRACY
  • MEMBER
Ok that worked. Installed new crank sprocket, cam sprocket and chain. All put back together. Engine spins over just fine but did not start. Removed spark plug. It smelled of fresh gas. I checked for fire. No fire at the spark plug. I feel so much at a loss. I can't afford to pay a professional to fix. Please help me. I have read that the camshaft sensor has to be set a certain way or engine will not fire. It is slotted like it does have an adjustment. I don't know how to do this. All I can say is the sensor was fine when I removed from blown engine. Also does the crankshaft sensor have the same adjustment? If so this sensor I also removed from blown engine. Please help me figure out why I have no fire. Last thing. I timed the camshaft sprocket and crankshaft sprocket per information I received from someone on this site. Cam sprocket timing mark at 6 o'clock pointing at crank and crank timing mark at 12 o'clock pointing at cam. Please help me I have no way to go.
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Monday, July 31st, 2017 AT 11:33 AM
Tiny
KEN
  • ADMIN
Hello,

Lets start with a compression test.

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/how-to-test-engine-compression

Please run this test and get back to us we are interested to see what it is.

Cheers, Ken
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Monday, July 31st, 2017 AT 12:15 PM
Tiny
JOETRACYJOETRACY
  • MEMBER
All cylinders averaged around 150 to 155. But how would compression have anything to do with a no fire issue? Because that's my problem. Please help
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Monday, July 31st, 2017 AT 12:34 PM
Tiny
JOETRACYJOETRACY
  • MEMBER
I don't mean that the engine is not running I actually mean there is no fire or spark if u will at or on any of the spark plugs. They are all dead so to speak. This is why I was asking about properly setting the camshaft sprocket
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Monday, July 31st, 2017 AT 12:36 PM
Tiny
JOETRACYJOETRACY
  • MEMBER
Art, darn auto correct. I meant camshaft sensor not sprocket.
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Monday, July 31st, 2017 AT 12:37 PM
Tiny
JOETRACYJOETRACY
  • MEMBER
Can you please help?
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Wednesday, August 2nd, 2017 AT 3:33 AM
Tiny
STEVE W.
  • EXPERT
OK, Reading through this. You started with a 99 truck and are putting in a 95 engine.
You used the 99 intake and rail, and installed the cam&crank sensors from the 99.
The crank sensor is the same and the crank signal wheel is the same so that part should work.
The camshaft however uses a different trigger wheel on the 99 vs. The 95.
That part has to be changed to make the ECM trigger the spark.
You say you replaced the timing chain and sprockets, with which year engine parts did you use? The picture shows the 99 cam sprocket, does the one you have look the same?
Do you still have the 99 engine?
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Wednesday, August 2nd, 2017 AT 6:38 AM
Tiny
JOETRACYJOETRACY
  • MEMBER
No, dont believe the sprocket pictured is the one I just installed. I did order a timing set off ebay. Came with cam and crank sprockets and chain. Stated it was one that was for 1996 thru like 2002. Thats the one I ordered. I did however time it according to the picture. No spark at plugs. Was informed that my issue was not installing the cam sensor correctly. Was told something about using a paper spacer between the cam sensor and the block then tighten the bolt. Is that so? Or if not true how do I test the cam sensor? I am mechanically inclined and do have a meter. Please please help me.
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Wednesday, August 2nd, 2017 AT 4:59 PM
Tiny
JOETRACYJOETRACY
  • MEMBER
Here is the gear the top one
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Wednesday, August 2nd, 2017 AT 5:11 PM
Tiny
JOETRACYJOETRACY
  • MEMBER
Here is the gear the top one. Cam gear part number S798. The entire timing set part number 73153
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Wednesday, August 2nd, 2017 AT 5:22 PM
Tiny
JOETRACYJOETRACY
  • MEMBER
Sorry forgot to tell ya. These are Autozone part numberz
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Wednesday, August 2nd, 2017 AT 5:22 PM
Tiny
STEVE W.
  • EXPERT
To set the air gap on the cam sensor the easy way is to take a single thickness piece of cereal box cardboard, put a dab of grease on the end of the sensor. Look into the bore to verify that the high side of the sprocket is in the hole. Then you slide the sensor in and LIGHTLY hold it in place. Now tighten the bolt. When you turn the engine over the first time it will slide the cardboard off and the clearance is set.
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Thursday, August 3rd, 2017 AT 7:49 AM
Tiny
JOETRACYJOETRACY
  • MEMBER
I gotcha however I am co fused on 1 thing. Sounds like your saying put a little grease on the tip of the sensor. Then place the piece of cereal box cardboard also on the tip and the grease helps hold it in place. Is this correct? If so, what happens to the cardboard once I turn the engine over the 1st time. I know u said it slides of the end but that means it would drop down around the timing chain and crank gear. Would that pose a problem mechanically? Or does it simply disolve?
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Thursday, August 3rd, 2017 AT 9:37 AM
Tiny
STEVE W.
  • EXPERT
The best way is to install it, then mark the location and remove the sensor, then reinstall it to the mark. But I have done it both ways with no ill effects. I've also used two pieces of 3M post it notes when the system was being fussy. Basically the sensor reads the leading and trailing edge of the ring. The paper just sets a gap so the ring will turn and not hit the sensor. If it's set in the wrong spot the sensor will get wiped out the second it gets hit. New sensors come with plastic on them, you install them and the plastic gets shaved off after a couple rotations.
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Thursday, August 3rd, 2017 AT 11:32 AM
Tiny
JOETRACYJOETRACY
  • MEMBER
U know u have been the most patient and helped me more than anyone ever has and I wanna thank u very much for that. I do believe I understand now. With instructions u gave me, I still humbly ask u if the tiny piece of cardboard goes onto the end of the sensor and then inserted and if the cardboard when it slides off will cause any issues while inside the timing cover floating around. And I sent or posted the part number for the cam gear and the timing set that I bought and installed with a picture. Did u see it and please tell me that's the right part. That was a lot of work for me installing that.
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Thursday, August 3rd, 2017 AT 1:33 PM
Tiny
STEVE W.
  • EXPERT
Your choice on the paper/cardboard. It is thin and won't hurt anything, but if it worries you, you can easily use some sticky paper or even a couple pieces of duct tape on the end, then make a mark where the sensor sets on the cover. Remove the sensor and remove the tape, reinstall the sensor. Line it up with the mark and tighten it down. The "special paper" that the dealers use isn't anything special, just a.030 shim of paper with sticky glue on it.

The image matches the one I have for the gears for a 99. So it should be correct.
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Thursday, August 3rd, 2017 AT 3:33 PM

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