1989 Chrysler Le Baron Ran out of gas. I added fuel, but s

Tiny
FISHES8
  • MEMBER
  • 1989 CHRYSLER LE BARON
  • 4 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 12,000 MILES
I ran out of gas on the way to get fuel. I put a few gallons in and it registers 1/8th full. Car still wont start. I can hear the fuel pump. I checked I have fuel pressue in the fuel rails (i dont know the exact pressure). I didnt get spark at the plugs, so I checked the coild. No spark at the coil. I suspect I may have blown an inline fuse someplace but I cant figure out where it is. I have Chrysler repair manauls, but ironically I cant find anything about fuses.
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Saturday, November 15th, 2008 AT 9:45 PM

5 Replies

Tiny
JAMES W.
  • MEMBER
Running out of gas will have nothing to do with losing spark. With the key on, do you have power to the + positive side of the coil?
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Saturday, November 15th, 2008 AT 9:59 PM
Tiny
FISHES8
  • MEMBER
Its entirely possible that the car developed some electrical anamoly at the very moment my car was on vapors. During my web searches (before I narrowed it to spark) I did happen across a forum post (another site) that said its possible that a relay, fuse, etc. May have been tripped because of the extra draw from the fuel pump running dry.

The other thing I learned from all of this was that many fuel pumps are cooled by the fuel, so never let it run dry or you might be looking at replacing the fuel pump! Okay, so lets forget that I ran out of fuel. I'm trying to find out what could cause no spark from the coil (assuming the coil is good).
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Saturday, November 15th, 2008 AT 11:31 PM
Tiny
JAMES W.
  • MEMBER
It is true, fuel pumps are cooled by the fuel in the tank. GM and Chrysler are not noted for burning out a pump on an empty tank, but Ford is notorious for it. We can't "assume" the coil is good, we need to know. With key on check for power on the + positive side of the coil. If yes, check for + voltage on the negative side. If no, the coil is bad. Next you need to check for injector pulse. This can be done with an "incandescent" test light connected between both terminals of a disconnected injector connector and cranking the engine. You are looking for the light to blink. If no blink, it is either the crankshaft position sensor or the ECM. The coil and injectors get the signal to fire from the ECM and the CPS.
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Sunday, November 16th, 2008 AT 1:02 AM
Tiny
FISHES8
  • MEMBER
I replaced the coil cuz it was only $20 and it had some corrosion. I also replaced the igniton relay on a whim because I thought it might have been related to the Automatic Shutdown (ASD). It also was cheaper that a new ECM. I tried testing for pulse with a multi-meter. It just went from 9 volts to 6 volts during cranking. The book said it should wiggle back and forth. Is a test light more accurate?

What is the crankshaft position sensor?
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Tuesday, November 18th, 2008 AT 1:27 AM
Tiny
JAMES W.
  • MEMBER
Yes, an "incandescent" test light or an analog volt meter works the best. If you are using a digital meter, it won't respond quickly enough. The "wiggle back and forth" is the needle on an analog meter. The crank shaft position sensor, CPS, tells the ECM when to fire the plugs and the fuel injectors. Also, there is a unit called a "noid light" that is a small zenon bulb that plugs directly into the injector connector and flashes like a timing light. You can get a complete set at most parts stores for about $20.
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Tuesday, November 18th, 2008 AT 5:21 PM

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