Alternator to battery fusible link location needed

Tiny
TERRY BOYD
  • MEMBER
  • 1998 DODGE CARAVAN
  • 3.3L
  • 6 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 310,000 MILES
I need to know precisely where to find the fusible link between the alternator and the battery, since both lines to the alternator connections run in one wrapped bundle.

Suspect that fusible link may be the problem as to why not only the alternator light is on, but I had weird glitches in instrument panel (loss of tachometer and speedometer, ABS light coming on). In process of changing the PCM which I suspect may have received damage to the voltage regulator chip inside. Really getting tired of dismantling the top of my engine compartment if you know my meaning. And I need my one and only transportation!

Added Information:
New alternator and new battery installed prior to symptoms described.
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Monday, February 20th, 2017 AT 11:13 AM

10 Replies

Tiny
STEVE W.
  • EXPERT
The link is in the positive cable right near the battery terminal. Check the ASD relay as well.
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Monday, February 20th, 2017 AT 12:03 PM
Tiny
TERRY BOYD
  • MEMBER
Will check. Thanks
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Monday, February 20th, 2017 AT 12:41 PM
Tiny
TERRY BOYD
  • MEMBER
Steve W. That is not it! This is not letting me add a photo as it should. So I cannot show you. Main big cable from post is to the starter/starter solenoid, smaller red cable (ten gauge) goes to the PDC, also to the PDC is a dark green cable (ten gauge) and that is to the PCM. No fusible links. I am not a pro mechanic, but I do know what a fusible link is and where they should be placed and placing this one at the target area (battery) is not the proper place. Logically a fusible link is placed close to the source of the powering device in order to protect the system and targeted area which in this case is the battery and PCM since the voltage regulator circuitry and control chip are located within the PCM.

Thanks for the help, but not for this computer controlled system without an external voltage regulator unlike a 1970's model of Dodge.
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Tuesday, February 21st, 2017 AT 6:07 AM
Tiny
TERRY BOYD
  • MEMBER
For all With this problem.
Check with your local auto parts store and have them look up your vehicle to see whether your car has a fusible link in the charging system. I did just that since my local Dodge dealer would not tell me if it did or not. This particular model of Grand Caravan does not have a fusible link in the charging system. The reason given were the amount of relay, fuses and other safeguards installed in the system. The voltage regulating system is a control chip in the voltage regulator circuitry that's inside the PCM and cannot be repaired independently, the entire PCM must be replaced.
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Tuesday, February 21st, 2017 AT 9:20 AM
Tiny
STEVE W.
  • EXPERT
I guess that Dodge must lie then.

These are the wiring diagrams for that vehicle and both show that it has a fusible link (A111 Dark. Green ten gauge) spliced to the black with gray wire that goes to the alternator at the battery end.

And in your complaint about being given wrong information you state "Main big cable from post is to the starter/starter solenoid, smaller red cable (ten gauge) goes to the PDC, also to the PDC is a dark green cable (ten gauge) and that's to the PCM. NO FUSIBLE LINKS"

The dark green wire is the fusible link. It is bonded (electrical splice 09) to the Black with gray stripe about one foot down the harness.

Go look at the wire on the battery terminal of your alternator. What color is it?
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Tuesday, February 21st, 2017 AT 10:17 AM
Tiny
KEN
  • ADMIN
I agree with Steve W. The fusible links are near the battery on the fender well of the drivers side tire and they fail often I have replaced many myself.

Ken - Site Admin
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Tuesday, February 21st, 2017 AT 6:51 PM
Tiny
TERRY BOYD
  • MEMBER
Maybe these will help what I said. And as I said there's no fusible link in this vehicle. Left RED is main, right RED leads to PDC and that Dark Green (same color as my schematic says the fusible link A111 is) leads from PDC to the PCM. The bundle under the PDC between the PDC and PCM has the Red Main in it but NO FUSIBLE LINK. So, after tracing every bundle from battery to alternator including the leads to the ignition system and fuel injectors and not finding anything I went to the Dodge Dealer parts store to get a brand new ASD RELAY and asked their chief mechanic (showing every photo I had taken). He looked it up and looked up my VIN and found that this 1998 Grand Caravan Sport does not have a fusible link. So, when I post what I am told by a dealer's mechanic after an hour and twenty minutes of searching and waiting it's not my imagination. Besides it makes no difference now anyway because I had to order a whole new PCM after having this one checked out because the voltage circuitry chip smoked out. Presumption is by what the codes showed is that it lost ground apparently of which I have no doubt since that fender was severely damaged in an accident 2 yrs ago. Just one of several parts that had to be replaced in time as a result. Like I saud, Thanks For Your Help!
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Tuesday, February 21st, 2017 AT 7:25 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
There's a lot of misinformation here. You found the dull dark green wire. That is the fuse link wire. Tug on it. If it acts like a wire, it's good. If it acts like a rubber band, it's burned open. The problem is it doesn't come off the battery cable like in years past. The smaller positive battery wire bolts to the under-hood fuse box. That connection is where the fuse link wire is bolted.

The next problem is most of these diagrams only show what is relevant to the specific circuit. You could have multiple fuse link wires bolted to that connection, but the one for the alternator does not go to the Engine Computer. It goes straight to the alternator's output terminal.

There is no need to even have to know where that fuse is unless testing proves otherwise. Just measure the voltage on the alternator's output stud. It should have full battery voltage all the time. If it does, you're done in that circuit.

Forget the ASD relay. It's true that it sends current to the alternator's field winding, but it also powers the ignition coil pack and injectors. If the engine runs, the ASD relay is turning on. Less than ten seconds to eliminate those two circuits.

It is also correct the voltage regulator lives inside the Engine Computer, but it is incapable of being damaged by the alternator. They put it there to simplify the circuitry needed to provide information used to modify the target charging voltage. That can include wide-open-throttle, turning on the AC compressor, engine running too hot, ambient air / battery temperature real cold, etc. It is possible for the regulator circuit to fail, but it's not very common. I've only run into one since 1990. That low-current circuit is also real easy to test. Look at the two smaller terminals bolted to the back of the alternator. The engine must be running for them to have voltage from the ASD relay. One will have full battery voltage. The other one must have less, but not 0 volts. If you find 0 volts, the brushes are worn. (Nine bucks for a replacement assembly). If you find exactly the same voltage on both terminals, there is a break after that point. That could be the voltage regulator is open, but it is much more likely there's a corroded terminal in the connector going to it.

Typically you'll find between 4-11 volts on the second terminal. The lower the voltage, the greater the difference there is across the two of them, and the larger the electromagnetic field is. That one voltage will tell you if the low-current input circuit, including the voltage regulator, is working.
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Tuesday, February 21st, 2017 AT 8:09 PM
Tiny
STEVE W.
  • EXPERT
Looking it up by VIN wouldn't matter. The wiring doesn't change for the charging system based on the option package for the Caravan.
The accident it was in however could easily have changed that. Whoever repaired it probably decided that a straight run of 10 gauge green fuse link was easier than splicing together the wiring like the OEM part. Not uncommon. Did the PDC also get replaced at that time?

Either way, you seem to have it repaired. Good luck with it. Oh does it have the clunk in the front that they get after about 80K when the sway bar bushings wear out?
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Tuesday, February 21st, 2017 AT 8:32 PM
Tiny
KEN
  • ADMIN
Nice follow up men! Lets get to the bottom of this one.
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Wednesday, February 22nd, 2017 AT 12:11 PM

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