2002 Pontiac Montana won't start after warmed up to operati

Tiny
OHBOY
  • MEMBER
  • 2002 PONTIAC MONTANA
  • 6 CYL
  • AWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 86,000 MILES
I an currently unemployed and have limited resources to keep vechile running. Spent much money at dearlerships to repair this vechile. But as usual they can't find the problem. At my wits end need this vechile to get kids to school, and elder;y parents to doctors amd so on. Any help at all will be greatly apreciated. Vechile will start fine in morning but when I get to my destination and return to start car it will not start, but if you wait about a hour or so it will run without any problems. But after stopping somewher for a minute it will not start. But if you wait for about a hour it will start and run fine. Don't have any extra money to donate if I could I would most certainly donate plaese help me if you can.
thank you and may god blees
Do you
have the same problem?
Yes
No
Monday, March 1st, 2010 AT 7:52 PM

6 Replies

Tiny
2CARPROS MIKE
  • ADMIN
You can take your car to Pep Boys or Autozone for a free computer scan to see if there have been any error codes set.

When the engine won't start you need to find out which system fuel or spark is not working and go from there.

Here is a troubleshooting page to get started:

http://www.2carpros.com/first_things/car_cranks_but_wont_start.htm
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Wednesday, March 3rd, 2010 AT 5:16 PM
Tiny
WEEKENDCAPER
  • MEMBER
Have same problem exactley, was wondering if you have gotten it fixed, at my wits end. I just got the security completely redone as they thought that was the problem, I done a complete tune up including a fuel filter, new crankshaft sensor, some oil pressure sensor. Had fuel pressure tested which was fine. Not sure where to go from here, the dealer told me I'm chasing an expensive ghost, i'm soo invested and stubborn I can't quit, want it fixed NOW, PLEASE HELP.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
+1
Saturday, March 26th, 2011 AT 5:09 PM
Tiny
RASMATAZ
  • MEMBER
Is the security system squared away and functional?

It takes 3-element of combustion to get an engine to crank and start are as follows compression, fuel and spark-

Next time it decides to make you wait, don't do below immediately to determine if its fuel or spark problem and get back with some testing results so we can to continue to troubleshoot-

Get a helper disconnect a sparkplug wire or 2 and ground it to the engine at least 3/16 away from ground -have helper crank engine over-do you have a snapping blue spark? If so-you have a fuel related problem, Do you hear the fuel pump come On when you turn key on? If not check fuel pump fuse and fuel pump relay if so, check the fuel pressure to rule out the fuel filter/fuel pump/pressure regulator and listen to the injector/s are they pulsing or hook up a noid light. No snapping blue spark continue to troubleshoot the ignition system-power input to the coil/coil packs, coil's resistances, distributor pick-up coil, ignition control module, cam and crank sensors and computer Note: If it doesn't apply disregard it
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Sunday, March 27th, 2011 AT 12:20 AM
Tiny
DENNJONAK
  • MEMBER
Hey, has anyone found a solution to this! I have the exact same issue. Van will start cold, but restarting while warm just doesn't happen. It cranks fine and even acts like it has fuel for a second or two, chugs, and then quits. It seems apparent that the fuel pump and injectors are working fine because you can drive it around all day without it dying. It's only an issue upon warm start-up. The only code I've seen so far is for an evap leak. One other thing: sometimes the fuel gauge drops to Empty while driving, but the van continues to run fine. All these symptoms seemed to appear around the same time. Any ideas?
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Tuesday, April 5th, 2011 AT 2:02 AM
Tiny
DAN HENDERSON
  • MEMBER
Coolant temperature sensor fixed it
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Thursday, December 21st, 2017 AT 6:43 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
What all of you are describing is real common on any brand of engine. The symptom will be no spark and no injector pulses. It is usually caused by a failing crankshaft position sensor or camshaft position sensor. They fail by becoming heat-sensitive, then they work again after cooling down for about an hour. While driving, natural air flow keeps them cool. When a hot engine is stopped, the heat migrates up to the sensors and causes them to fail.

To add to the misery, diagnostic fault codes often won't be set just from cranking the engine. They may only set while a stalled engine is coasting to a stop. For that, the best approach is to connect a scanner so you can view live data. Those sensors should be listed with some type of indication to show whether their signals are showing up during cranking. For example, on my Chrysler scanners, they're listed with a "No" or "Present". I know GM scanners show the same thing, but I don't know what their terminology is.

The two-wire coolant temperature sensors are low-level and only contribute slightly to fuel metering calculations. One notable exception is when starting a GM engine. Corrosion between the adjacent terminals in the connector will cause lower overall resistance, and therefore lower signal voltage, which equates to hotter coolant. In response, the Engine Computer will command a smaller priming squirt of fuel than is needed. You'll have hard starting or a long crank time, but you will still have spark. A common observation is the engine will start, then run fine after getting a squirt of starting fluid.

Coolant and air temperature sensors have an extremely low failure rate because they have just one component inside them. Ford had a rash of failures in the early '90s where it looks like an internal connection broke loose and caused resistance, signal voltage, and ultimately, idle speed to bounce around wildly. Other than that, temperature sensors are pretty trouble-free. Most problems are caused by wiring and connector terminal problems. Also, for any visitors who aren't aware, temperature sensors for Engine Computers will always have two wires in their plugs. If you find a coolant temperature sensor with just one wire, that's for the dash gauge.

For the comment about the fuel level gauge dropping to "empty", a common cause of that is a weak spring-loaded movable contact on the float arm in the tank. On most vehicles you can buy a new sending unit, but on the early to mid '90s Chrysler minivans, once the pump is lifted part-way out of the tank, it takes just a minute to lift a plastic hook, then slide the float arm off, then you can bend the contact a little to put more pressure on the sensing element. That fix is more reliable than installing a new sending unit which is likely to develop the same problem in a few years. I know that can be done on some other brands too. The common symptom on the Chryslers was the gauge will read correctly any time the level is between "full" and "1/2", and between "1/4" and "empty". It would drop to "empty" when the level was between "1/4" and "1/2".
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Thursday, December 21st, 2017 AT 7:24 PM

Please login or register to post a reply.

Recommended Guides