Engine stalled while driving

Tiny
AZZAM12AZZAM
  • MEMBER
Thanks Joe. I will wait for your opinion at your convenient time.
Take care,
Azzam
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Sunday, January 19th, 2020 AT 11:06 AM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Did you send the pics? I still haven't received anything. Hope all is well.

Joe
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Sunday, January 19th, 2020 AT 8:07 PM
Tiny
AZZAM12AZZAM
  • MEMBER
Hi Joe.
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Monday, January 20th, 2020 AT 12:23 PM
Tiny
AZZAM12AZZAM
  • MEMBER
I tried to send the picture it upload fine, but doesn't upper with my replay. I don't know why. Is there other way to send it?
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Monday, January 20th, 2020 AT 12:29 PM
Tiny
AZZAM12AZZAM
  • MEMBER
This is one more try. I hope I succeed.
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Monday, January 20th, 2020 AT 12:32 PM
Tiny
AZZAM12AZZAM
  • MEMBER
Okay, good. It was my mistake. Sorry
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Monday, January 20th, 2020 AT 12:34 PM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
No problem whatsoever. The compression is the issue. The only way to check is to take things apart (remove heads). The idea that it has 0 psi in cylinder 8 is either a valve stuck open or a hole in the piston. I'm really surprised it runs smoothly for you. I would suspect a very rough running vehicle.

Joe
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Monday, January 20th, 2020 AT 7:47 PM
Tiny
AZZAM12AZZAM
  • MEMBER
Thanks Joe, in this case should I think about replacing the engine or as I understood the problem in cylinder 8 only which should be fixed and other cylinders works fine. There is no other problems in the engine especially. It runs okay the heat in normal position. Also I checked oil it was normal because Ford dealer they said that too they have to open the engine to check the problem which will cost about ($1,400.00) and tell me what they found out and cost of spare parts should be replaced. I was little bit worried to take this action because (I don't like surprises) if they have to do a lot of replacement. Even though they said they will deduct the above amount from the total cost I am not sure what should I do if the problem changing one cylinder only it is okay with me. From what you see do you think I have big engine problem? Even though I understand from the little information I provided you may be hard to say but some times way really in our feelings in life.
Thanks for your help Joe.
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Tuesday, January 21st, 2020 AT 2:16 PM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
I have to be honest, there is a good chance it will be a major repair. However, one doesn't know until it is take apart. Can you confirm one more time for me the engine size? If you look below, I attached the options that were offered in 2010 and the 6.0L diesel isn't mentioned. The 6.4L, the one I circled, is the power-stroke diesel.

I need to confirm it so I can get you the correct directions for head removal. It is something you can most likely do yourself. That way you can save the inspection money and we can determine the problem.

If you look at picture 2, it indicates the labor time to charge for head gasket replacement. Let me know. If you can turn the wrenches, I can give you the directions.

Take care,
Joe
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Tuesday, January 21st, 2020 AT 5:14 PM
Tiny
AZZAM12AZZAM
  • MEMBER
Hi Joe,

(major repair consist of what as far as you think)
I have been told it is 6.0 (I couldn't find any information on the engine) but I find this (vin)1FDXE4FP5ADA30421 I hope it helps.
Am not sure about doing this myself (even though I liked the idea) which saves me good money unless if you tell me how you will guide me to see if I can catch up with you (frankly I don't have tools but I can mange that). Otherwise might hire somebody for that still cheaper than the dealer. Be kind enough to explain to me picture 2 it is not clear for me.
If I understand right to this point you will not take used engine as an option.
Thanks Joe for your kindness.
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Wednesday, January 22nd, 2020 AT 3:10 PM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
As far as the VIN you provided, the engine code is "5" which is a 6.0L power-stroke diesel. So I don't know why my manual isn't providing that info. The only thing I can think is it was different for export.

As far as head removal, all I have is for the 6.4. Guess what. I just figured out why I couldn't find it. You listed it as an F450. I believe it is an E450 which offers the 6.0L Diesel.

As far as major repairs, it could be a cracked or damaged cylinder head, block, bent valve, piston damage and so on which can mandate engine replacement. I feel bad not to provide a clear answer, but I don't know what to expect.

Here are the directions for total engine disassembly. It is extensive. I'm including everything. If it is only the heads that need removed, you will stop at that point. All attached pictures correlate with the directions.

________________________________________________

2010 Ford Truck E 450 V8-6.0L DSL Turbo
Engine - Disassembly
Vehicle Engine, Cooling and Exhaust Engine Service and Repair Overhaul Engine - Disassembly
ENGINE - DISASSEMBLY
303-01D Engine 6.0L Diesel 2010 E-Series
DISASSEMBLY
Engine

Special Tool(s)
pic 1
209-00153 or equivalent
pic 2 6.0 Liter and 6.4 Liter Engine Stand Adapters
209-00154 or equivalent
pic 3 Dial Indicator Gauge with Holding Fixture
100-002 (TOOL-4201-C)
pic 4 Feeler Gauge Set
303-D027 (D81L-4201-A) or equivalent
pic 5 Lifting Bracket, Cylinder Head
303-759
pic 6 Release Tool, Injector Connector
303-1115
pic 7 Remover, Crankshaft Front Wear Ring
303-762
pic 8 Remover, High Pressure Supply Tube
303-1164
pic 9 Remover/Installer, Glow Plug Connector
303-1114
pic 10 Remover, Oil Seal
303-D060 (D86T-6701-B) or equivalent
pic 11 Service Set, Camshaft
303-017 (T65L-6250-A) or equivalent
pic 12 Slide Hammer
100-001 (T50T-100-A)
pic 13 Socket, Injection Pressure Regulator
303-1112
Material
Item Specification
Motorcraft Metal Brake Parts Cleaner (US) / Motorcraft Brake Parts Cleaner (Canada)
PM-4-A or PM-4-B (US); CPM-4 (Canada)
Disassembly

NOTE: For additional information, refer to the exploded view under the Assembly procedure in this section.

Remove the engine. For additional information, refer to Engine in this section.
NOTE: RH shown, LH similar.

Remove the 8 bolts and the motor mount brackets.
Pic 14
Mount the engine on the 2000 LB. Engine Stand with the 6.0 Liter and 6.4 Liter Engine Stand Adapters.
Pic 15
Remove the 10 bolts and the flexplate.
Discard the bolts.
Pic 16
Remove the nut and position the fuel tube support bracket aside.
Pic 17
Remove the 2 stud bolts and thermostat housing.
Remove and discard the O-ring seal.
Pic 18
Remove the LH cylinder head banjo bolt and fuel tube.
Discard the sealing washers.
Pic 19
Remove the bolt and the accessory drive belt idler pulley.
Pic 20
If equipped, remove the 2 bolts and serpentine belt tensioner.
Pic 21
Remove the 4 bolts and oil filter adapter.
Pic 22
Remove and discard the O-ring seals from the oil filter base.
Pic 23
NOTICE: In the event of a catastrophic engine failure, always install a new oil cooler. Foreign material cannot be removed from the oil cooler and engine damage may occur.

Remove the 10 bolts and the oil cooler assembly.
Pic 24
If necessary, replace the oil cooler. For additional information, refer to Oil Cooler in the disassembly and assembly of subassemblies portion of this section.
Remove the oil pump inlet strainer.
Clean and inspect for tears and other damage.
Pic 25
Remove the 3 bolts and the turbocharger heat shield.
Pic 26
Using the Injection Pressure Regulator Socket, remove the Injection Pressure Regulator (IPR) valve.
Pic 27
Remove the 8 bolts from the high-pressure oil pump cover.
Pic 28
NOTE: To prevent engine damage, do not pry the high-pressure pump cover from the pump or damage to the cover can occur.

Use a thin gasket scraper to separate the cover from the crankcase at the rear cover seam. Remove the high-pressure oil pump cover.
Remove and discard the press-in-place gasket.
Pic 29
Position the Dial Indicator Gauge with Holding Fixture and check the oil pump drive gear backlash.
Pic 30
Remove the bolts on the high-pressure oil branch tube adapter.
Pic 31
Remove the bolts and the high-pressure oil pump.
Pic 32
Remove and discard the lower O-ring seals.
Pic 33
Remove and discard the high-pressure oil pump O-ring seal.
Pic 34
NOTICE: Do not pull on the wiring to remove the glow plug connector or damage may occur.

Using the Glow Plug Connector Remover/Installer, remove the glow plug harness.
Pic 35
Remove the 8 glow plugs.
Pic 36
Remove the protective covering from the LH cylinder head.
NOTE: Mark the location of the stud bolts.

Remove the 6 stud bolts, 5 bolts and the RH valve cover.
Clean and inspect the gaskets. Install a new gasket, if necessary.
Clean and inspect the sealing surfaces.
Pic 37
Remove the high-pressure oil rail-to-valve cover gasket.
Pic 38
Remove the 4 bolts and the coolant pump pulley.
Pic 39
Remove the 4 bolts and the coolant pump.
Discard the O-ring seal.
Pic 40
If equipped, remove the 3 bolts and the dual generator pulley.
Pic 41
Check the crankshaft vibration damper runout.
Remove the paint from the face of the crankshaft vibration damper at 4 points, 90 degrees apart.
Attach the Dial Indicator Gauge with Holding Fixture to the cylinder block. Position the Dial Indicator Gauge with Holding Fixture on one of the unpainted surfaces.
Using a suitable tool, pry the crankshaft forward. Zero the Dial Indicator.
NOTE: Pry the crankshaft forward at the same point to eliminate possible error caused by crankshaft end play.

Rotate the crankshaft 90 degrees. Pry the crankshaft forward. Record the measurement. Repeat at each unpainted surface.
If the runout exceeds specification, install a new crankshaft vibration damper.
Pic 42
image WARNING: Support the vibration damper during mounting bolt removal. The damper can slide off the nose of the crankshaft. Failure to follow this instruction may result in serious personal injury.

NOTICE: To prevent engine damage, always install new bolts when installing the vibration damper.

Remove the 4 bolts and the crankcase vibration damper.
Discard the bolts.
Pic 43
Punch 2 holes in the crankshaft front seal.
Pic 44
Using the Oil Seal Remover, remove the crankshaft front seal.
Discard the seal.
Pic 45
NOTE: Production seals will not have a wear sleeve. If a service part has been installed, it will have a wear sleeve.

If equipped, remove and discard the crankshaft seal wear sleeve with the Crankshaft Front Wear Ring Remover.
Pic 46
Remove the 5 bolts and the oil pump body.
Discard the O-ring seal.
Pic 47
NOTE: Mark the front of each drive rotor for correct reassembly orientation.

Remove the inner and outer oil pump drive rotors.
Pic 48
Remove the 17 bolts and engine front cover.
Pic 49
NOTICE: Sealant is used where the crankcase and lower crankcase meet. Failure to cut the sealant may result in pulling the lower crankcase seal out and damaging it while removing the front cover gasket.

Use a thin-blade scraper to cut the sealant where the crankcase and the lower crankcase meet. Remove and discard the front cover gasket.
NOTICE: Use extreme care when removing the flywheel front adapter to prevent damage to the alignment dowel pin.

Remove the flywheel front adapter.
Pic 50
NOTICE: To prevent engine damage, do not remove the rear primary crankshaft flange bolts under any circumstances. If the flange is removed and reinstalled, it will result in engine vibration and premature transmission component wear.

NOTICE: Drill only deep enough to penetrate the seal. Engine damage will occur if the seal is drilled too deep.

Using a center punch, mark a location for 2 holes 180 degrees apart, 9.53 mm (0.37 in) from the outer diameter of the crankshaft flange. Using a drill bit of the appropriate size for the Slide Hammer being used, drill a hole on each side of the crankshaft rear seal as shown. Drill the holes to a depth of 8.76 mm (0.34 in) to capture the metal case of the crankshaft seal as well as the wear ring.
Pic 51
Using the 2 drilled holes, the Slide Hammer and a commercially available body dent puller attachment, walk the seal out of the rear cover by alternating from side to side to remove the crankshaft rear seal.
Discard the crankshaft rear seal.
Pic 52
Clean and inspect the crankshaft sealing surface.
Pic 53
NOTICE: To prevent engine damage, replace damaged or missing dowel pins before installing the engine rear cover.

Remove the 8 bolts from the engine rear cover.
Pic 54
NOTICE: Sealant is used where the crankcase and the lower crankcase meet. Failure to cut the sealant may result in pulling the lower crankcase seal out and damaging it while removing the rear cover.

NOTE: A 139.7 mm (5.5 in) long thin-blade scraper is needed to properly cut the sealant.

Using a thin-blade scraper, cut the sealant where the crankcase and the lower crankcase meet.
Pic 55
NOTICE: Sealant is used where the crankcase and the lower crankcase meet. Failure to cut the sealant may result in pulling the lower crankcase seal out and damaging it while removing the rear cover.

NOTE: A 139.7 mm (5.5 in) long thin-blade scraper is needed to properly cut the sealant.

Using a thin-blade scraper, cut the sealant where the crankcase and the lower crankcase meet. Remove the engine rear cover.
Remove and discard the press-in-place gasket.
Clean and inspect the sealing surfaces.
Pic 56
Prior to removing the exhaust manifolds, inspect the exhaust manifolds for warpage with a feeler gauge between the manifold and cylinder head. Record the measurement and compare with the specification.
Remove the 8 bolts, 8 spacers and the RH exhaust manifold.
Discard the bolts.
Pic 57
Remove the 8 bolts, 8 spacers and the LH exhaust manifold.
Discard the bolts.
Pic 58
Disconnect the fuel injector electrical connectors.
Pic 59
Remove the crankcase-to-head tubes.
Pic 60
NOTE: Left cylinder head shown, right cylinder head similar.

NOTE: Do not remove the oil rail end plugs or acoustic wave attenuator port fitting. Service parts are not available to support these components.

Remove the 18 bolts and the high-pressure oil rails.
Pic 61
NOTE: Use a shop towel and metal brake parts cleaner to remove the oil residue prior to removing.

If the crankcase-to-head tube separated, using the High Pressure Supply Tube Remover, remove the lower crankcase-to-head tube.
Pic 62
Inspect the D-ring seals for damage (nicks, cuts and gouges). If damaged, replace the crankcase-to-head tube.
Pic 63
Remove the port plug from the high-pressure oil rail.
Inspect the port plug O-ring seals for damage (nicks, cuts and gouges). If damaged, replace the port plug.
Pic 64
NOTICE: Do not attempt to apply battery voltage to the fuel injector or damage to the fuel injector may occur.

Using the Injector Connector Release Tool, push the fuel injector electrical connectors out of the rocker arm carrier.
Pic 65
Prior to removing the injector assembly, insert clean shop towels in the oil drain holes adjacent to each glow plug.
NOTICE: To prevent engine damage, do not use air tools when removing and installing the fuel injectors.

NOTE: There is no need to drain the fuel rail.

NOTE: If engine coolant is found in the combustion chambers, it may be necessary to install a new injector sleeve. For additional information, refer to Section 303-04D.

NOTE: The bolt is part of the fuel injector hold-down assembly.

Loosen the bolt and remove the bolt and fuel injector hold-down assembly and the fuel injector.
Remove and discard the O-ring seals and copper washer.
Pic 66
Remove the shop towels.
NOTE: Left cylinder head shown, right cylinder head similar.

Remove and discard the 20 head bolts from both cylinder heads.
Pic 67
Remove the 16 bolts and the rocker arm assemblies.
Pic 68
NOTE: Left cylinder head shown, right cylinder head similar.

Remove the 4 bolts and the rocker arm carriers.
Remove and discard the press-in-place gaskets.
Clean and inspect the sealing surfaces.
Pic 69
NOTE: Mark the location of the valve bridges before removing.

Remove the 16 valve bridges.
Pic 70
NOTICE: To prevent engine damage, keep the push rods in the order in which they were removed. Install all push rods back in their original positions. The push rods are directional and the copper-coated end must be installed in the upward position where it will contact the rocker arm.

Mark and remove the 16 push rods.
Pic 71
Remove the 10 outer head bolts.
Pic 72
Using the Cylinder Head Lifting Bracket, remove the cylinder heads.
Pic 73
Check for cylinder head distortion. For additional information, refer to Cylinder Head Distortion in this section.
Remove and discard the cylinder head gaskets.
Pic 74
Remove and discard the 4 cylinder head dowel sleeves.
Pic 75
Check the cylinder block distortion. For additional information, refer to Cylinder Block Distortion in this section.
Remove the bolts and the high-pressure oil branch tube.
Pic 76
NOTICE: To prevent engine damage, keep the cam followers in the order in which they were removed. Install all cam followers back in their original positions.

Remove the 2 bolts, the roller follower guides and the hydraulic cam followers.
Pic 77
Remove the 9 bolts and the upper oil pan.
Remove and discard the press-in-place gasket.
Clean and inspect the sealing surfaces.
Pic 78
NOTE: Prior to removing any piston and connecting rod assemblies, it is recommended that piston protrusion be evaluated. This will help identify bent or twisted connecting rods.

Check the piston protrusion above the crankcase as follows:
Position the Dial Indicator Gauge with Holding Fixture.
Zero the Dial Indicator Gauge on the crankcase deck surface.
Position the Dial Indicator Gauge tip on the piston head at the 3 o'clock or 9 o'clock position.
Rotate the crankshaft to measure the maximum piston protrusion and record.
Reposition the Dial Indicator Gauge tip onto the piston head at the opposite position.
Rotate the crankshaft to measure the maximum piston protrusion and record.
Average the 2 readings. If the average reading is lower than the specification, the piston is lower in the bore than it should be. This indicates a bent or twisted connecting rod.
Pic 79
Using a Feeler Gauge Set, check for the minimum connecting rod side clearance.
Pic 80
NOTE: Only one connecting rod cap shown.

Remove the 16 bolts and the connecting rod caps.
Pic 81
NOTICE: To prevent engine damage, remove the ridge prior to removing the rod and piston assemblies if evident from the top of the cylinder bore. This reduces the chance of piston ring land damage during removal.

Use a razor knife or emery board to scrape the carbon ridge from the top of the cylinder bore.
Using a wood or plastic hammer handle, push the connecting rod and piston assembly out of the cylinder bore.
Pic 82
Remove and discard the piston rings.
Remove the keystone ring.
Remove the intermediate compression ring.
Remove the oil control ring.
Pic 83
Remove and discard the connecting rod bearings.
Pic 84
Install the Dial Indicator Gauge with Holding Fixture and measure the camshaft gear backlash. Install a new gear if backlash is not within specification.
Pic 85
Install the Dial Indicator Gauge with Holding Fixture and measure the camshaft end play. Install a new camshaft thrust plate if end play is not within specification.
Pic 86
NOTICE: To prevent engine damage, do not remove the rear primary crankshaft flange bolts under any circumstances. If the flange is removed and reinstalled, it will result in engine vibration and premature transmission component wear.

Install the Dial Indicator Gauge with Holding Fixture and measure the crankshaft end play. Record the end play.
Pic 87
Remove the bolt and the Crankshaft Position (CKP) sensor.
Pic 88
Remove the bolt and the Camshaft Position (CMP) sensor.
Pic 89
Remove the block heater.
Pic 90
Remove the 20 lower case bolts and the lower crankcase assembly.
Pic 91
Remove the lower crankcase seals and the lower bearings and discard.
Pic 92
Using the appropriate lifting device, remove the crankshaft assembly.
Pic 93
Remove and discard the crankshaft upper bearings and crankshaft upper thrust bearing.
Pic 94
NOTICE: Do not nick or scratch the camshaft bearings with the camshaft lobes or engine damage may occur.

Remove the 2 thrust plate mounting bolts and remove the camshaft and gear.
Pic 95
NOTICE: This patch bolt is unique. Do not substitute or engine damage can occur.

Remove the 8 bolts and the 8 piston cooling tubes.
Pic 96
Using the Camshaft Service Set, remove the camshaft bearings and discard.
Pic 97

________________

Let me know if this helps.

Joe
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Wednesday, January 22nd, 2020 AT 8:58 PM
Tiny
AZZAM12AZZAM
  • MEMBER
Hi Mr. Joe,

I really cannot thank you enough for what you have sent and time you spent for sending me this information. I am really thankful.
Honestly I don't know what to say or what to do. It is just bad luck because the car only had less than 60,000 miles on it and stored most of the years of its life.
I think it is better to buy used one but I don't know where to look if you feel this is better please let me know. I will go for it or if you ask me not to hurry I will consider that too.
God bless you.
Azzam
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Saturday, January 25th, 2020 AT 12:10 PM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Hi,

I'm hopeful that I helped. I wish I was there to better guide you. I'm not sure which way to go. If you take the engine apart, I can't be sure what you will find. Again, the idea that there is no compression in cylinder 8 indicates more than just a head gasket. Instead, something with a valve being stuck open or even a broken or damaged piston.

I suspect at this point, if you can afford to replace it, that would may be the best thing. I don't want you to take this one apart just to find it will cost more to repair than a replacement.

Listen, I am here if you need anything. It's a pleasure to help you. Let me know what you decide. If you want to replace the engine yourself, I can provide the directions for that as well.

Let me know.

Joe
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Saturday, January 25th, 2020 AT 7:27 PM
Tiny
AZZAM12AZZAM
  • MEMBER
Hi Mr. Joe thanks for your sympathy it is nice of you.

Am sorry to tell you today I had another problem while I was driving and stopped in traffic light I stepped in gas but car wont move. I put it in reverse also the same I looked under the car the drive shift is accelerating on d drive and reverse but the rear differential not responded. I don't know why or it is related to engine problem or it is separate. I called a tech to look at it tomorrow and I will tell you the result sorry.

(is there a sensor or cable or fuse related with differential and where it is located? If any the gear oil good because when I talked to a tech he said may be electric problem he will not confirm until he comes and check differential as well ) sorry again honestly am starting to feel shy from keeping you busy.
Best wishes Joe.
Azzam
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Sunday, January 26th, 2020 AT 3:40 PM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Hi,

I think you may want to consider getting rid of this vehicle. The rear differential is either a Dana 60 or Dana 70 and both are extremely solid units. I am concerned how the vehicle was cared for prior to you purchasing it.

If I had to guess, I would first check to see if the pinion flange nut came loose and is allowing the flange to move away from the differential and no longer making contact with the splines. Take a look at the attached picture. The drive shaft attaches to the round flange and then that flange is bolted to the differential. That may have come loose.

Is there any noise associated with this new issue?

Joe
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Sunday, January 26th, 2020 AT 6:24 PM
Tiny
AZZAM12AZZAM
  • MEMBER
Hi Mr. Hoe I have been thinking of that too recently. These types of cars very complicated to fix what I liked about this car in first place is the box frame is all aluminum and solid and relay very comfortable to drive but as you know facts different than wishes may be I will look for spinster Mercedes or Fiat if I decided what I will do. I was avoiding to buy RV due it is over my budget also repairing such vehicle difficult due to its electronic, cables, equipment It has I have simple needs as an RV.
But any way thank very much for all what you have done to me I will check what you have send and let you know. Thanks again Joe.
Azzam
(To answer your question no I did not hear any noise before)
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Monday, January 27th, 2020 AT 2:43 PM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
You are very welcome. Let me know how everything turns out for you.

Joe
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Monday, January 27th, 2020 AT 8:26 PM
Tiny
AZZAM12AZZAM
  • MEMBER
Hi Mr. Joe, after tomorrow I have appointment to fix differential first impression from the tech who came to check the car in my house said could be small problem, but he has to open to see the problem. Your advice I ask him to check the pinion flange first before he open.
Is there fuse or cable related to the differential and where it is located if any? Because another tech I talked to him by phone he said it could be electrical problem am not sure if he understand the problem right.

Thanks Joe
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Thursday, January 30th, 2020 AT 5:57 PM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Hi,

I'm not sure what he is talking about since there are no electronics in the differential. Did he specify what he was referring to? And there are no cables or fuses related to this. If the driveshaft is turning and is attached to the differential, something either came apart or has broken. It is a mechanical component.

Joe
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Thursday, January 30th, 2020 AT 7:10 PM
Tiny
AZZAM12AZZAM
  • MEMBER
Hi Joe,

Sorry for the trouble the other tech miss understood me he thought it is gear problem after I forwarded him your answer.
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Friday, January 31st, 2020 AT 1:51 PM

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