1995 Ford Explorer black smoke

Tiny
BOBBY_LANGE
  • MEMBER
  • 1995 FORD EXPLORER
Engine Performance problem
1995 Ford Explorer 6 cyl Four Wheel Drive Automatic 154k miles

i have a 95 explorer and sometimes when I drive the check engine light comes on and the car acts like transmisson slips out of gear then smokes black smoke restart the car or drive it a few blocks it kicks out of it had it to three mechanics one said computer one said the fuel pump and the other one didnt get any codes any ideas been scratching my head for a month
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Saturday, February 21st, 2009 AT 6:25 PM

3 Replies

Tiny
JGAROFALO
  • MEMBER
Some of the causes of black smoke would be the fuel pressure regulator and the mass air flow sensor. More likely the sensor than the regulator. Also, when mass air flow sensors go out of calibration, they do not always generate a trouble code.

Just a few quick ideas.
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Sunday, February 22nd, 2009 AT 8:33 AM
Tiny
BOBBY_LANGE
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Do you think that maf would make the tranny act like its slipping and the check engine light flashes a bunch and I cant turn the overdrive off when its acting up its really weird
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Sunday, February 22nd, 2009 AT 8:48 AM
Tiny
JGAROFALO
  • MEMBER
There are a lot of possibilities here. Bad signals from the MAF can "confuse" the computer, causing many possible "reactions." The computer decides which gear to activate in the transmission based on inputs from sensors. It calculates for engine loading, RPMs, road speed, etc. If a sensor gives a reading that is not correct, but not out of range, it can cause the computer to select the wrong gear. This can give the impression of slipping. If the computer selects a higher gear than it should, it can seem very sluggish, like if you put a manual transmission in high gear at 5mpn. If this happens with an automatic, the torque converter is then the only reduction available, so it will rev up to stall speed without making the car move as it should.

There is also the possibility that you have more than one problem, in which case the two symptoms may be unrelated.

Start with the problem that is the most important, and then work from there to see if other problems exist.

As with any diagnosis, do not overlook the basic needs of an engine - fuel/air mix, spark, and compression. If one goes wrong, the other two will not matter. Too many people start out by guessing and changing parts. This is an expensive way to effect a repair.

A live reading from several sensors and a fuel pressure gauge while it is acting up would be a big help. If you have a scan tool with this capability or a friend that has one, that would be a good place to start. Good luck.
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Sunday, February 22nd, 2009 AT 11:21 AM

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