Engine stalls at idle?

Tiny
YNOTMEFUCK
  • MEMBER
  • 2001 FORD TAURUS
  • 3.0L
  • 6 CYL
  • 2WD
  • 10,000,000 MILES
Codes, p1309, po102, po141, po171, po174, po302, 303, 304, 305. Need to know if you have meaning. Thanks
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Wednesday, January 1st, 2020 AT 10:57 AM

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Tiny
SCGRANTURISMO
  • EXPERT
Hello,

This guide can help us fix it which should make the codes go away

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/stall-at-idle

In the diagrams down below I have included the definition and possible causes for Direct Trouble Codes[DTC][s] P0102, P0141, P0171, P0174, and P1309. DTCs P0302, P0303, P0304, and P0305 are DTC's for misfires with the last number representing the cylinder number. So DTC P0302 is a misfire in cylinder 2, P0303 is a misfire in cylinder 3, and so on. I have also included guides for finding intermittent conditions, finding opens, finding short to grounds, finding unwanted resistance with voltage drop, and the engine management wiring diagrams for your vehicle. You will need to use a Digital Multi-meter [DMM] to go through these guides, so here is a link below explaining how to use one, if needed:

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/how-to-use-a-voltmeter

Please go through these guides and get back to us with what you find out.

Thanks,
Alex
2CarPros
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Wednesday, January 1st, 2020 AT 11:52 AM
Tiny
ASEMASTER6371
  • EXPERT
Good afternoon,

Alex has given great information for you but I want to try and give it in easier terms.

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/engine-misfires-or-runs-rough

The misfire codes and the 171,174 could all be related to low fuel pressure from a bad fuel pump. I would start with checking the actual fuel pressure.

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/how-to-check-fuel-system-pressure-and-regulator

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/how-to-replace-an-electric-fuel-pump

The 102 is mass air flow sensor. Make sure the hose from the sensor to the throttle body is hooked up, tight and has no leaks.

The 141 is for the heater circuit for the O2 sensor. The most common cause is the sensor itself.

Roy
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Wednesday, January 1st, 2020 AT 12:44 PM
Tiny
ZCOLBURN
  • MEMBER
  • 2001 FORD TAURUS
  • 6 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 157,000 MILES
The car ran ruff and also had the engine light on. I ran an OBD II and got a P301 code. Replaced the plugs/wires. When I pulled the number 4 and 5 plug I found them to be soaked in oil. The engine light went out and it runs smooth as long as you dont let it idle. Can someone help me out here.
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Saturday, August 22nd, 2020 AT 9:34 AM (Merged)
Tiny
BMRFIXIT
  • EXPERT
Check for vacuum leaks
drive it around and check for pending codes
looking for any misfiring codes to come back
check coil at #1 if firing and have a strong spark
clean IAC valve
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Saturday, August 22nd, 2020 AT 9:34 AM (Merged)
Tiny
AMCFADGE
  • MEMBER
  • 2001 FORD TAURUS
  • 6 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 76,500 MILES
Good morning. I have a Ford Taurus with 76,500 miles, and I am beginning to experience a violent flutter with the vehicle while it's idle (whether it's in park or if I'm waiting using my brakes). At times it feels like the car may cut off trying to hold an idle status, but it'll begin bucking and stay on. I began seeing signs of this problem sparsely if I go without driving the vehicle a day or more. When I'd cut it on, it would rev up and would flutter for about 3-5 seconds (like it's doing now) then rev up as normal. However, it's beginning to happen now everytime I'm stopped or in park. Do you have any idea what the problem might be?
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Saturday, August 22nd, 2020 AT 9:34 AM (Merged)
Tiny
MERLIN2021
  • EXPERT
You may have a vacuum leak, get a can of spray throttle body cleaner, spray the vac lines and maniflod area, when the idle changes, youve found the leak! You want the engine running and spray on the outside but do direct the stream onto the hoses, if it is a vacuum leak, the engine idle will change speed, then you have detected a leak, repair the vacuum leak and see how it runs! If that doesnt do it, you may need a new idle air control valve, it's bolted to the throttlebody.
Clean the throttle body with the cleaner and a rag, with the engine off.


https://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/62217_CRC_Throttle_Body_14.jpg

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Saturday, August 22nd, 2020 AT 9:34 AM (Merged)
Tiny
LAZRSLNG
  • MEMBER
  • 2001 FORD TAURUS
2001 Taurus 3.0. Ive changed plugs and filters. Ck Engine light is on. Read the codes and they indicated a lean condition on both Bank 1 and Bank 2. Read other forums and they steered me away from the O2 sensors and toward either a vac leak or fuel injector problem. Non visible or audible vacuum leaks. Looking further here makes me me wonder about the MAF. I intend to replace the fuel filter (wife almost ran it out of gas last week, but she says the symptoms preceed that). Next course of inquiry? Any replies can be emailed to lazrslng@comcast. Net
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Saturday, August 22nd, 2020 AT 9:34 AM (Merged)
Tiny
SERVICE WRITER
  • EXPERT
I prefer to keep everthing on the forum versus e-mail when possible for future reference for others.

Did you look at the post in the ford heading for po171 & po174 common problems by Chris?
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Saturday, August 22nd, 2020 AT 9:34 AM (Merged)
Tiny
PARRISHKAY
  • MEMBER
  • 2000 FORD TAURUS
  • 6 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 130,000 MILES
The car will run fine until it comes to a stop and then the RPMs drop to zero and does not want to idle. It does not happen every time it is driven, only occasionlly. What could be causing this?
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Saturday, August 22nd, 2020 AT 9:34 AM (Merged)
Tiny
2CEXPT
  • EXPERT
Try cleaning out the idle air control valve, test the throttle position sensor and EGR valve

Stalling can be caused by anything that upsets the air/fuel mixture. This includes vacuum leaks or unmetered air entering the intake manifold downstream of the airflow sensor, a faulty throttle position, MAP or oxygen sensor, dirty fuel injectors, or low fuel pressure to the injectors (weak fuel pump, faulty fuel pressure regulator or restricted fuel filter
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Saturday, August 22nd, 2020 AT 9:34 AM (Merged)
Tiny
LTRIB
  • MEMBER
  • 2000 FORD TAURUS
  • 6 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 10,000 MILES
Engine stalls at idle early in the morning when the engine is cold. I have to hold my left foot on the accelerator pedal at traffic lights, stop signs, etc. Once the car is warmed up, the engine will rarely stall. Had the engine looked at and was told there might be a vacuum leak. Where is unknown.
What are the possible causes? Thanks!
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Saturday, August 22nd, 2020 AT 9:35 AM (Merged)
Tiny
MERLIN2021
  • EXPERT
Get a can of spray gumout, spray the vac lines and maniflod area, when the idle changes, youve found the leak! You want the engine running and spray on the outside but do direct the stream onto the hoses, if it is a vacuum leak, the engine idle will change speed, then you have detected a leak, repair the vacuum leak and see how it runs! If that doesnt do it, ECT may be shaky, this acts like the choke on efi vehicles.
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+1
Saturday, August 22nd, 2020 AT 9:35 AM (Merged)
Tiny
SCOTTTX
  • MEMBER
  • 1999 FORD TAURUS
  • 6 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 80,000 MILES
Greetings all,

My mother's 1999 Ford Taurus will not idle when starting cold, and once it's warm it will occasionally throttle way up whether the car is in gear or not. I had the codes pulled and it came back with:

p1151 - Lack of O2 switches bank 2 sensor1. Could not adjust fuel trim because of a lean or rich condition.

And

p1507 - Idle Air Control (IAC) underspeed error. ECM has detected an engine speed less than desired.

I changed the fuel filter and checked all the vacuum hoses. On the advice of a friend I unplugged the IAC while the car was idling to see if it changed the idle. The car idled way down.

The car runs great once it's warm. Any advice or hints would be greatly appreciated, as I'm a little worried about my mom driving the car while it throttles way up on it's own like that.
Thanks in advance.
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Saturday, August 22nd, 2020 AT 9:35 AM (Merged)
Tiny
MERLIN2021
  • EXPERT
TEST KE: IDLE AIR CONTROL (IAC) VALVE Diagnostic Aids Perform this test when instructed during QUICK TEST or if directed by other test procedures. This test is used to diagnose the following: Throttle linkage. Wiring harness circuits (IAC and VPWR). Faulty Idle Air Control (IAC) valve. Faulty throttle body. Faulty Powertrain Control Module (PCM). 1) Check For DTCs Retrieve and record all Continuous Memory DTCs. Perform KOER ON-DEMAND SELF- TEST . If unable to complete KOER SELF-TEST, go to next step. If KOER SELF-TEST is complete and DTC P0505, P1504 or P1507 is present, go to next step. If DTC P0505, P1504 or P1507 is not present, IAC system is okay and testing is complete. If symptom exists, go to TROUBLE SHOOTING - NO CODES - EEC-V article. Fig. 169: Identifying IAC Circuit & Connector Terminals Courtesy of FORD MOTOR CO. 2) DTC P0505, P1504 & P1507 DTCs P0505 and P1504 indicate IAC system malfunction has been detected. DTC P1507 indicates that IAC system under speed fault has been detected. Possible causes are: IAC circuit open or shorted to PWR. VPWR circuit open. Contaminated IAC valve assembly. Damaged throttle body. Faulty IAC valve. Faulty PCM. Turn ignition off. Disconnect IAC valve connector. Turn ignition on. Measure voltage between VPWR terminal at IAC valve wiring harness connector and ground. See Fig. 169 . If voltage is more than 10.5 volts, go to next step. If voltage is 10.5 volts or less, repair open in VPWR NOTE: After each service or repair procedure has been completed, reconnect all components. Clear DTCs and repeat QUICK TEST procedures to ensure all EEC-V systems are working properly and DTCs are no longer present. NOTE: If DTC P0402 was output during self-test, service DTC prior to continuing with this test step.circuit. 3) Check IAC Valve Resistance Turn ignition off. Connect DVOM positive lead to VPWR terminal at IAC valve. Connect DVOM negative lead to IAC terminal at IAC valve. If resistance is 6-13 ohms, go to next step. If resistance is not 6-13 ohms, replace IAC valve assembly. 4) Check IAC Valve Internal Short To Case Turn ignition off. Measure resistance between each IAC valve terminal and IAC housing. If both resistance readings are more than 10,000 ohms, go to next step. If any resistance reading is 10,000 ohms or less, replace IAC valve assembly. 5) Check For Plugged Air Inlet System Turn ignition off. Remove air filter. Inspect air filter, MAF sensor and air inlet system for excessive dirt or contamination. Repair as necessary. If air inlet system is okay, go to next step. 6) Check For Vacuum Leaks Start engine and allow to idle. Inspect air inlet system any of the following possible faults: Cracked or punctured air inlet tube. Loose inlet air tube or air cleaner housing. Loose or damaged throttle body. Contaminated or damaged IAC valve assembly. Faulty EGR valve or gasket. Faulty PCV valve or hose. Check entire intake air system for vacuum leaks. Repair as necessary. If no vacuum leaks are found, go to next step. 7) Check IAC Circuit Continuity Turn ignition off. Disconnect PCM 104-pin connector. Inspect connector for loose, damaged or corroded terminals. Repair as necessary. Measure resistance between PCM connector pin No. 83 (IAC) and IAC terminal at IAC valve wiring harness connector. If resistance is 5 ohms or more, repair open in IAC circuit. If resistance is less than 5 ohms, go to next step. 8) Check IAC Circuit For Short To Power Turn ignition on. Measure voltage between PCM connector pin No. 83 (IAC) and chassis ground. If voltage is one volt or more, repair short to power in IAC circuit. If voltage is less than one volt, go to next step. 9) Check IAC Circuit For Short To Ground Turn ignition off. Disconnect scan tool from DLC. Measure resistance between PCM connector pin No. 83 (IAC) and pins No. 51 and 103 (PWR GND). If resistance is more than10,000 ohms, go to next step. If resistance is 10,000 ohms or less, repair short to ground in IAC circuit. 10) Check IAC Signal From PCM Reconnect PCM connector. Reconnect IAC valve connector. Start engine and allow it to idle. Using scan tool, select IAC and RPM PIDs from PID/DATA monitor menu. Ensure engine is at normal operating temperature. With all accessories off and throttle closed, IAC duty cycle should be about 22-45 percent. Observe PID value and slowly increase engine speed to 3000 RPM, then return to closed throttle position (if closed throttle RPM is significantly higher than normal, ignore this part of the procedure). IAC duty cycle should increase as engine speed increases. If IAC PID values are not as specified, replace IAC valve (DTC P1507) or replace PCM (all others). If IAC PID values are as specified, proceed as follows: If Continuous Memory DTC P1504 or P1507 is present, go to step 30). If Continuous Memory DTC P1504 or P1507 is not present, check throttle body for damage. Repair as necessary. If throttle body is okay, replace IAC valve. NOTE: A break in step numbering sequence occurs at this point. Procedure skips from step 10) to step 20). No test procedures have been omitted.30) Check IAC System For Intermittent Open Or Short Circuit Connect scan tool to DLC. Start engine and allow to idle. Ensure all accessories are off and engine is warmed to normal operating temperature. Using scan tool, select IAC and RPM PIDs from PID/DATA monitor menu. IAC duty cycle should be 20-45 percent. Observe IAC and RPM PIDs for indication of fault while performing the following: Wiggle and bend wiring harness starting at IAC valve and work toward PCM. Lightly tap on IAC valve to simulate road shock. Fault will be indicated by sudden change in IAC PID or RPM PID value. If any faults are found, isolate fault and repair as necessary. If no faults are found, problem cannot be duplicated at this time. Go to TEST Z .


https://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/62217_p1507_1.jpg



https://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/62217_PCM_Connector_5.jpg

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Saturday, August 22nd, 2020 AT 9:35 AM (Merged)
Tiny
MERLIN2021
  • EXPERT
Subject: Re: p1507
Thanks a lot for your response!

I don't think I can test the IAC on my own so I think I'll follow your advice and just replace it. In your experience will a bad IAC keep the car from idling when cold? I've read as much as I can about them and they seem to be more associated with high idling. A friend suggested I try cleaning the throttle body.

Thanks again for your help. Have a good day.
Cleaning the throttlebody is a good idae, but you also either need to remove the iAC and inspect/clean the pintle of carbon, Ford recommends replacement, as cleaning them usually wont work!
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Saturday, August 22nd, 2020 AT 9:35 AM (Merged)
Tiny
SWINSKIN
  • MEMBER
  • 1996 FORD TAURUS
I overheated the motor due to a broken belt. I replaced a cracked head and had the other remanufactured. Now I am getting fuel in the oil and dont know why. It happens after only 10 miles or so of driving. The car runs well but will occasionally try to die at idle. The compression was good and consistent after the head was replaced, and all plugs are new, clean and dry. I replaced the seals on all fuel injectors, but I did not replace the fuel regulator gasket. Any help for a shadetree mechanic would be greatly appreciated?
Thank you
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Saturday, August 22nd, 2020 AT 9:35 AM (Merged)
Tiny
2CEXPT
  • EXPERT
Get it to start-pull the vacuum hose at the pressure regulator-do you see fuel if so replace regulator. Also the injectors might be leaking for some reason inside-is this the same old injectors when you blew the engine?

Go underneath the vehicle is the catalytic converter glowing while engine being run for 10mins or more.

Also are you experiencing rough idle.

Do you have an OBD2 code/s?
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Saturday, August 22nd, 2020 AT 9:35 AM (Merged)
Tiny
SWINSKIN
  • MEMBER
It has the 3.0 OHV motor with 115k miles on it. There are no codes and no check engine lights are on. It runs well after an oil change but quickly gets fuel in the oil. It idles a little rough and occasionally tries to die directly after letting off the gas when slowing down.
The injectors are original. When I first replaced the head gasket I did not properly seat the injectors in the fuel rail and it was dumping fuel everywhere. Now there are no visible leaks, and it doesnt start to smell like fuel until the oil has been saturated and you can smell it burning. Is there any way to test the injectors myself or have them tested? I dont want to replace all the injectors b/c they are so expensive.
Thank you very much for your help, I will try those suggestions and see what I can find out. I am out of ideas short of blindly replacing parts
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Saturday, August 22nd, 2020 AT 9:35 AM (Merged)
Tiny
MCX69
  • MEMBER
  • 1993 FORD TAURUS
  • 6 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 140,000 MILES
Hi, I have a 1993 Ford Taurus that is experiencing some major problems. The car will not idle right and it stutters and often dies when idling. It will also die if driving at city speeds and you have to stop quickly. Also, once it dies, it really hesitates to start back up again, but this only happens once it it warm. It starts just fine when it is cold. There is a heavy gas smell from the engine compartment like it is running very rich, and if you watch the exhaust when someone revs it up, you can see plenty of carbon dust and chips come out of the pipe. As you can guess I am getting crappy gas mileage as well. On my last check I got about 17 mpg, which is terrible for a v6 car. I have changed the plugs a few months ago, but it didn't help resolve my problem. I've also checked for vacuum leaks, but all the lines are good and there is no evident suction audible. I don't have alot of money atm, so I'm trying to figure out what parts most likely need replaced first to try and fix the problem. Also, my check engine light is not functional, but I have tried to get my codes checked, but neither Autozone or Advance has a code reader for the car. Any help on what steps to take first would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
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Saturday, August 22nd, 2020 AT 9:35 AM (Merged)
Tiny
BLONDEMOMMY
  • MEMBER
Hi. My husband has been a machanic for sixteen years and wanted to tell you that you might have two seperate problems. Could be the air idle control solenoyde. Its a circural round valve next to throttle body. ON the opposite side where the trottle cable connects to. As far as the heavy gas smell and smelling rich, bad gas mileage and smoke, it sounds like you have a bad fuel pressure regulator. It is a round looking object that sits on the end of the fuel rail opposite of the other end where the fuel line connects to which is attached to your six injectors on the top of the intake manifold. First check to see that you have vacuum going to it. By pulling off the hose, and feeling with your finger if there is any suction to it. If you don't have vaccum, then you need to check to see if the line is broke or kinked some where. Also when you check it, take your finger and smell for any evidence of a gas smell. If you smell any gas, then the regulator is defective. You should not be able to smell anything if it is not defective. Also there could be a chance that the regulator could be stuck wide open and making the engine recieve full fuel pressure regardless of the demand for it and that also would be defective. Good luck. Hope this helps. Please let us know what you found out. My husband is curious. You can contact us directly at Blondemommy81505@aol. Com.
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Saturday, August 22nd, 2020 AT 9:35 AM (Merged)

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