Engine overheats

Tiny
ENGINEERINGDAD
  • MEMBER
  • 2004 VOLVO S80
  • 2.9L
  • 6 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 129,000 MILES
On my car listed above (T6 turbo) it overheated due to fan failure. I replaced the fan unit with an OE Volvo fan assembly (30749759) but after letting the car run at idle and checking the coolant discharge and return hoses I am getting a temperature of about 193 degrees before the fan radiator cooling fan starts. At 193 degrees the reservoir bottle is already bubbling violently and releasing pressure from the cap about when the fan decides to come on. I replaced the thermostat and CTS sensor several months prior and had no incidents. Cleaned radiator coil, inter-cooler coil, EVAP coil prior to new fan installation. Radiator no clogs, no system leaks, no head gasket issues; thermostat opens at 180 degrees, and starts closing at 170 degrees. Is there another sensor I am missing that triggers the start/stop of cooling fan? Can I install a lower temperature thermostat and CTS to avoid premature overheating in rush hour traffic? Again everything is operable according to procedures, but not quick enough. I am an Engineer by trade (thirty years) but this has me a bit baffled.
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Wednesday, May 9th, 2018 AT 4:04 AM

15 Replies

Tiny
KEN L
  • MASTER CERTIFIED MECHANIC
Hello,

At 193 it should not be boiling over and that is when the cooling fans come on which is normal. You could have a blown head gasket even though there is no coolant in the oil. Here is a guide to help us check:

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/head-gasket-blown-test

Also, I would replace the radiator cap or have it tested to make sure the cooling system is holding pressure.

Please let us know what happens.

Cheers, Ken
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Friday, May 11th, 2018 AT 10:42 AM
Tiny
ENGINEERINGDAD
  • MEMBER
Thanks Ken, I will pick up a chemical kit to check for any potential head gasket issues. In updating my information, I was able to find that the Volvo's Turbo and Non Turbo Engines within the generations of 1999-2005 have coolant temperature sensors (CTS) that signal the ECM to start the radiator cooling fan at 194 degrees/90 Celsius. However, I know the expansion tanks cap was probably compromised when the car originally overheated in stop and go rush hour traffic, blowing the upper radiator hose off the upper radiator connection with an erupting volcano expansion tank due to the cooling fan going bad. The Volvo cap (22 psi rated) is designed to discharge to atmosphere, but in reality not enough by volume when there is total fan failure.

Question: Does anyone know if the Volvo's two speed cooling fan's "kick-in" on its highest RPM's at higher temperatures, like 215 degrees/101 Celsius?

Notes:
* Cooling Fan is a "new" OE #30749759.
* Cooling Fans Relays/Controller built-in the Fan Casing.
* Three Wire System Continuously Hot/60amp/ Hot Wire (red), Ground (black), Control Wire from ECM Purple/White.
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Tuesday, May 15th, 2018 AT 6:02 AM
Tiny
KEN L
  • MASTER CERTIFIED MECHANIC
Yes the two speeds are meant for extreme heat. I am interested to see if it passes the chemical test drain a little coolant out of the radiator so you do not containment the test.
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Tuesday, May 15th, 2018 AT 11:33 AM
Tiny
ENGINEERINGDAD
  • MEMBER
Ken,
Per the chemical test, I ordered a kit from Amazon. Com. The test results with the engine idling warm came back negative on several test. Three observations prior to chemical test:
(1) Top radiator hose blew off connection after car idle from cold start up to approximately half an hour, fan never kicked in, return radiator hose reading was at 208 F. Prior to hose separation. "Volvo poor design" not much neck to connect with a wider ban clamp.
(2) After removing CTS the resistance (ohms) readings fluxuated poorly/failed on different test temperatures in water submerged.
(3) After reinstalling the CTS the fan kicks in on high with just the key in on position with a cold engine.
I am at present ordering the Volvo OE complete thermostat housing and sensor and gaskets from Amazon. I just wished I did not waste my time with the eBay special I installed back in December 2017.
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Monday, May 21st, 2018 AT 10:28 AM
Tiny
KEN L
  • MASTER CERTIFIED MECHANIC
It sounds like you found the issue. I always use OEM parts or the good aftermarket ones everything else is a headache.

Here is a guide to show others that visit the post what you are in for when changing the sensor out:

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/coolant-temperature-sensor-cts-replacement

Check out the diagrams (below). Let us know what happens and please upload pictures or videos of the problem.

Cheers, Ken
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Tuesday, May 22nd, 2018 AT 9:51 AM
Tiny
ENGINEERINGDAD
  • MEMBER
Sorry folks for the delayed updates. As per the cooling issue, I purchased a Volvo OEM Bosch Cooling Fan Assembly from Europarts. Com at the right time to get it at 60% lower than their original price. I also purchased an OEM Thermostat Assembly which included the WTS, gasket and thermostat unit from Amazon. I saved the original thermostat and housing as spares. Checked the aftermarket WTS I original installed in 2017 using the stove top method with Water/Low Flame, Fluke Digital Multi-meter and an Infrared IR Thermometer Meter. The sensor is rated at 90C. /194F. With my water at 194F the WTS gave the following results; 0.23-2K meter setting on the Multimeter and maxed out at 210F. - 0.29-2K meter setting. Sorry I really do not have automotive Multimeter(s) I have industrial grade expensive Commercial Grade Electronic Testing Equip, but by some recalculating the sensor is not functioning properly, a dud, lessons learned. Trying to save a buck or two cost me time and additional cost. The positive of it all is the cooling fan assembly I pulled/purchased from the salvage yard two months prior is in excellent working and cosmetic condition, but it was not design for a Volvo S80 T6, I pulled it from a 2005 Volvo S60 five cylinder non-turbo. Anyone needs a Volvo OEM S60 cooling fan assembly cheap then they are in luck, LoL.

The Installation went great. Completed as follows:
Re-flushed cooling system with distilled water and Liquid Moly 2051 Radiator Cleaner - 300ml as directed. Part#: 2051
Replaced/installed new radiator hoses Upper/Part#: VOL-8623779... Lower/Part #: VOL-30680915
Installed new Volvo OEM complete thermostat housing assembly Part#: VOL-8636779
Installed new Volvo OEM complete cooling fan assembly. Part#: VOL- 8649821
Vacuumed down the entire system using my complete refrigeration recovery equipment. Very, very important to remember to using a refrigeration recovery tank or similar to catch coolant vapors or liquid solids before they reach and destroy your expensive vacuum pump. I have pictures if anyone's interested in “how it works”.

The start up:
Fired up the engine and immediate new discoveries, engine codes: P0301, P0302, and P0303 - Misfire cylinders 1-3. Engine vibration and live data on code reader verified accuracy. Ordered six New Bosch OEM coil packs (purchased as a complete kit-cheaper). Three days later installed and “Perfecto” back to smooth sailing.

One week ago:
My daughter and I heard a noise nobody wants to hear when I started the car. The dreaded sound of an empty aluminum can with several pull tabs rattling under your car. No its was not a midget under the car rattling a can, It is the beloved sound of your honeycomb baffle in your catalytic converter disintegrating, separation, collapsed, bye, bye.

Recently:
Loss of power in acceleration, pedal to the floor and struggles low grade hills, periodically code P0299. Drive a daily commute three hours (1.5 each direction) Monday through Friday Highway travel: 97% Residential: 3%. Check engine with P0240 and P0299 typically after exiting highways.
The following readings are listed from using Infrared IR Thermometer Meter and an AUTEL AL619 ABS SRS OBDII Diagnostic Tool Multi-Live Data Meter.

Temperatures:
480F-Temperatures prior (top of catalytic converter).
Fluctuating lower temperature (after catalytic converter).
280F-at the “Y” pipe/front muffler and after front muffler.

Voltage:
Prior to catalytic converter O2SB1 & B2...0.100 to.700 Volts - gradually (searching/normal)
Live data-voltage after the catalytic converter- SB1S2 & SB2S2...0.063 to 0.100 mA.

I do believe a properly working catalytic converter should be steady at.5 volts after the catalytic converter? Am I correct?

Installed/repaired/cleaned/maintain myself in less than six to twelve months:
NGK Indr. Plugs, Bosch coil packs, MAF sensor, cleaned throttle body, all new air filtration filters, vacuum test/leaks. Engine flush, gas filter, solenoid bypass valve, EVAP valve, Castrol 5W 30 full synthetic, premium synthetic oil filters x 2-3 a year, etc.
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Wednesday, July 18th, 2018 AT 4:03 PM
Tiny
KEN L
  • MASTER CERTIFIED MECHANIC
It still sounds like you have a blown head gasket. The chemical test can give false readings. Can you remove the spark plugs and pressure test the cooling system? Leave it for fifteen minutes under pressure then with the plugs out turn the engine over to see if coolant shoots out.

Here are guides to help:

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/radiator-pressure-test

and

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/how-to-change-spark-plugs

Please let us know what happens.

Cheers, Ken

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Thursday, July 19th, 2018 AT 10:33 AM
Tiny
ENGINEERINGDAD
  • MEMBER
Ken, I'm a bit late on the reply, but it was the cooling fan that was the issue. It was from a S60 and not a S80-2.9T. Problem resolved with a new OEM Fan and Bosal OEM Compatible Cat Converter Assembly.
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Tuesday, February 12th, 2019 AT 11:27 AM
Tiny
KEN L
  • MASTER CERTIFIED MECHANIC
Great find! Thanks for getting back to us. Glad you could get it fixed, that kind of problem can be tough. Please use 2CarPros anytime we are here to help.
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Wednesday, February 13th, 2019 AT 10:46 AM
Tiny
SQUID32
  • MEMBER
  • 2000 VOLVO S80
  • 6 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 123,000 MILES
The 2000 Volvo S 80 does not overheat while idling, however when you go to drive the car it overheats?
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Wednesday, February 13th, 2019 AT 12:28 PM (Merged)
Tiny
JIS001
  • CERTIFIED MECHANIC
Have you replaced the thermostat or at least had it checked out? You could have a thermostat not opening up fully?
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Wednesday, February 13th, 2019 AT 12:28 PM (Merged)
Tiny
CALDWELLG21
  • MEMBER
  • 1999 VOLVO S80
Engine Cooling problem
1999 Volvo S80 Automatic

The check coolant messgae came on in the dash with a red exclamation point. What should I do?
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Wednesday, February 13th, 2019 AT 12:28 PM (Merged)
Tiny
JIS001
  • CERTIFIED MECHANIC
For now top it off. As soon as you can, take it in to your local shop and have them check your cooling system for leaks. If they dont see anything in the engine compartment feel the drivers side carpet and check to see if it is wet. If it is your heater core is leaking.
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Wednesday, February 13th, 2019 AT 12:28 PM (Merged)
Tiny
GUEDNEY
  • MEMBER
  • 1999 VOLVO S80
  • 6 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 152,000 MILES
The car is hot, it get my butt to change the gasket, but not how to align the VCT system, or weapon normally and automatically adjusts the computer?
Best regards.

Pd:
Sir,
excuse my English but I speak Spanish.
greetings from Chile, South America.


https://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/411630_v3_1.jpg

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Wednesday, February 13th, 2019 AT 12:28 PM (Merged)
Tiny
JIS001
  • CERTIFIED MECHANIC
Do you have the tool to lock both cams ito place? Let me know.
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Wednesday, February 13th, 2019 AT 12:28 PM (Merged)

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