1998 Chevy Lumina Engine overheating

Tiny
DHULTINK
  • MEMBER
  • 1998 CHEVROLET LUMINA
  • 6 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 197,000 MILES
My engine keeps overheating. I have put coolant in it. Maybe I am not doing it the correct way. But I take the cap of (twist cap) and start the engine and keep filling the coolant in there untill it is full. And I typically let the car run for 30-45 mins and keep filling it. And about 3-4 weeks later it starts to over heat. I am not technical with cars at all. Could it be a leak somewhere? What is most common in these cases. I just don't want to put too much money in this car. I have had this car since 2001 and it has really been a great car. No problems other then the typical (battery, alternator).

Can you let me know what you are thinking about this issue?

Thank you very much,

Detlef Hultink
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Monday, June 9th, 2008 AT 3:58 PM

1 Reply

Tiny
DNAPRORACING
  • MEMBER
What Can Make an Engine Overheat?

Overheating is caused by anything that leads to a loss of coolant, prevents the cooling system from getting rid of heat, or causes excess heat in the engine itself:

Coolant leaks (water pump, radiator, heater core, hoses, freeze plugs, head gasket, engine internal).
Weak radiator cap (does not hold rated pressure and allows coolant to boil over). Pressure test the cap to check it out.

Cooling system clogged (deposits built up in radiator or in the engine due to maintenance neglect or use of hard water). Use a cleaner, then reverse flush system to clean it out. A badly clogged radiator may need to be rodded out or replaced.
Thermostat stuck shut (replace).
Inoperative electric cooling fan (check fan motor, relay and temperature switch for correct operation).
Bad fan clutch (replace if slipping, leaking or loose).
Missing fan shroud (reduces cooling efficiency of fan).
Slipping fan belt (tighten or replace).
Too low or too high a concentration of antifreeze (should be 50/50 for best cooling).
Bad water pump (impeller eroded or loose - replace pump).
Collapsed radiator hose (check lower hose).
Debris in the radiator (remove bugs & dirt).
Late ignition timing (reset to specs).
Restricted exhaust system (check intake vacuum readings and inspect converter, muffler & pipes).
Radiator and/or fan undersized for application (increase cooling power by installing larger radiator and/or auxiliary cooling fan).
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Monday, June 9th, 2008 AT 9:36 PM

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