2002 Blazer front rotor

Tiny
WGOOSSENS
  • MEMBER
  • 2002 CHEVROLET BLAZER
I have been trying to remove the front rotors from my 2002 2dr/2wd 4.3L Blazer (67,000 miles - first brake job). They seem to be hopelessly rusted onto the hub because they will not release even when struck repeatedly (and I mean that!) With a 2-pound hammer with serious effort. I have used penetrating oil until it runs all over, waited a day and still no success. Obviously Chevy has not bothered to put anti-sieze on the hubs during asembly. Any sugestions besides hitting it again? Is there a rotor puller tool of some kind - there should be! And. Should I be taking the rotors off every few thousand miles to make sure they don't do this again?
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Tuesday, September 4th, 2007 AT 8:14 AM

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Tiny
SERVICE WRITER
  • EXPERT
Whack it good between the studs. Just don't get the studs. If still nothing. Whack it good from the inside towards the outside. Turn it a quarter revolution and whack it again, continue till she pops.

You may need to go to a 5 pound hammer and swing a little harder. I have seen some techs use a torch to heat them up, but I get concerned about other things getting damaged in the processed.

Anti seize the replacement and don't worry til next time.
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Tuesday, September 4th, 2007 AT 8:22 AM
Tiny
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I tried and tried the BFH technique with bigger hammers and more elbow grease but no success.
While looking for answers around the internet, I came across a great solution from, of all places, a Ford truck chat site. Well, the technique worked wonderfully, was easy to do, required little effort, and didn t create the possibility of damage from constant hammer pounding. I d like to share it with you because in some cases it may make your life a little easier - it sure did it for me!

1. Remove the caliper and mounting bracket.

2. Insert a inch x 3 inch bolt into both the top and bottom caliper mounting bracket bolt holes with a heavy cut washer and nut on the inside towards the rotor. NOTE: If you want to save the rotor for resurfacing, you may want to add a nut or something else to the thread so that the bolt doesn t mar the surface of the rotor during the next steps. I don t ever reuse rotors so this was not an issue.


http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/97481_brake_1.jpg



2. An important step is to mark the rotor with a magic marker between the bolts. This will help you rotate the rotor 180 degrees in the next step.

3. Tighten the nut while holding the head of the bolt to put outward pressure on the rotor. Do this for both the top and bottom bolt somewhat equally. Loosen the nuts, rotate the rotor 180 degrees, and re-tighten the bolts again. Repeat this until the rotor becomes free.

4. Before re-assembling, I put anti-seize compound on the front and rim of the hub and on the inside rim of the new rotor.

Try this technique - it really works well! This worked great in my case because of the rust on the back of the rotor, but the reports from the website I got this from say that this works just as well for frozen rotors due to rust between the front surface of the hub and rotor. The constant pressure will eventually wear down the rust lock between the rotor and hub.
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Friday, February 1st, 2008 AT 8:10 AM
Tiny
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Thanks for the update!
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Friday, February 1st, 2008 AT 11:01 PM

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