Mechanics

BRAKES

2006 Ford Mustang • 15,000 miles

My dad was going to do a brake stand the other day, and he dumped the clutch and went for the brakes, but it sounded as if the clutch was put back in, when he didn't touch it, and it seemed to be a bit of a clutch burnout, but after looking some more, we jacked the rear end up, and now the brakes have locked up, the parking brake is off, and the brake pedal wont go all the way down, it will stop halfway down
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Mustangguy1
April 30, 2013.




Also it doesnt like to go into select gears, sometimes 1st, and reverse

Tiny
Mustangguy1
Apr 30, 2013.
Which brakes are locked up, front, rear, one, both, all? Also, you never want the brake pedal to go more than halfway to the floor. Running it down more than that will usually damage the master cylinder. Even when bleeding the brakes with a helper, which no professionals do, you never want to push the pedal over halfway.

If you have a brake that's not releasing on the rear, the first thing to look for is a rusted and partially-applied parking brake cable. Ford has a huge problem with them rusting up in as little as a year. When they are just sluggish you can often get them to retract by flexing the casing at that rear wheel.

The next step is to disassemble the locked brake to see what came apart. It could be as simple as a brake shoe lining rusted off and is wedged between the drum and the other shoe. A shoe return spring could have rusted apart allowing the shoe to keep grabbing the drum. It's also pretty common for the adjuster cable to rust apart and the lower hook gets wedged between the drum and rear shoe. Most of the time locked rear brakes are not serious. Getting the drums off is the hardest part.
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Caradiodoc
Apr 30, 2013.
We didnt check the front as we had the rear up and the front wedged to stop it from moving, but we didnt bleed them, and the pedal stoped dead about halfway as far as you usually can push it, and they are all 4 disc. The clutch is soft and doesnt want to engage certain gears at certain times, thinking it might be the master or booster, as the clutch and brakes both use the master

Tiny
Mustangguy1
Apr 30, 2013.
Okay, what I take that to mean is the brake pedal is going down like normal indicating there is no problem in that regard. I didn't mean to imply I thought you bled the brakes. I was simply pointing out that you want to avoid at all cost running the pedal more than halfway down, regardless of the reason. Crud and corrosion build up in the two bores of the master cylinder where the pistons don't normally travel. When you run the pedal to the floor, as many people think is normal, you run the lip seals over that crud and that can rip them. Often that damage doesn't show up for a few days, but it will cause a slowly sinking pedal. This is typically not a problem yet on master cylinders that are less than about a year old.

The clutch is hydraulic but it never is tied in with the brake master cylinder or power booster. Normally the clutch hydraulic system is sealed and everything has to be replaced as an assembly, but I have found some parts available separately. I would start by looking at the fluid line and slave cylinder for signs of leakage. Even if the worst thing happened and the clutch disc flew apart, one of the characteristics of a hydraulic clutch system is it self-adjusts. About the only things that can happen are fluid leakage and one of the cylinders isn't anchored solidly and it's moving instead of pushing on the release fork.

With the rear disc brakes the parking brake cables are still the most likely culprit. Ford and GM finally went to the same simple and reliable parking brake setup that Chrysler has always used, but on your car they're still using the miserable trouble-prone calipers with the parking brake built in. If you can identify a rear wheel that won't turn by hand with the transmission in neutral, remove that wheel and caliper, then you will need a special caliper tool to retract the piston a little. The tool threads the piston in. It can't just be pushed in like on front calipers. Only turn it about 1/8 turn or just enough that you can reinstall it freely. Those pistons do not self-adjust like the front ones. They adjust by applying the parking brake. If the parking brake cable is rusted tight, you can use a large pliers to work the lever a few times to adjust the piston.

You will usually find that special tool kit at auto parts stores that rent or borrow tools. They aren't terribly expensive to buy but it's not a good investment if you're likely to never use it again.

Caradiodoc
Apr 30, 2013.

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