Timing chain replacement

Tiny
MITCH80
  • MEMBER
  • 2002 TOYOTA COROLLA
  • 1.8L
  • 4 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 204,408 MILES
I recently bought a 2002 Toyota corolla with 204,408 miles the guy I bought from ran used oil in it and low on oil cause there was a valve cover gasket leak, now I am wondering should I replace the timing chain on car, it is not a belt. Thank you
Do you
have the same problem?
Yes
No
Sunday, February 21st, 2016 AT 7:13 AM

32 Replies

Tiny
SATURNTECH9
  • EXPERT
Timing chains don't have a change interval like a timing belt. There usually changed when they become noisy. Here are the instructions on how to replace the timing chain in the diagram below. Check out the diagrams (Below). Please let us know if you need anything else to get the problem fixed.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Tuesday, August 11th, 2020 AT 4:23 PM
Tiny
KEVINJ1987
  • MEMBER
  • 2002 TOYOTA COROLLA
  • 4 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 115,000 MILES
Here is the deal,

September 2007 I purchased my Corolla from a less than upstanding used car dealership (apparently not a smart decision. Live and learn) I purchased an extended warranty (not a dealership, but rather a private warranty)

February of 2008 It starts to make a high pitch banging noise in the engine. (I drive on it for about 2 weeks) I take it into a Toyota Dealership that. I won't be returning to. They tell me that my engine was "essentially torn apart and reconstructed" and that it was the cause of my timing chain slippage. A month later, they were still fighting with the engine as they eventually found out that some gasket had lost a piece and it floated into the oil line (which took time for them to figure out). They instruct me not to tell the warranty company about this update, as it may jeopardize what coverage I was getting from them (about 400 dollars) I paid for the remaining 1300 dollars. My car was out of commission for over 3 months.

March 2009 Around a year after I got my car back (and about 1200 miles out of the warranty the dealership applied to the parts that they replaced) The engine began making the sound again. Well, 20 minutes later as I was driving down the highway the timing chain gets snapped by a bolt that had fallen into that area, sending it through a cascading effect essentially tearing my engine apart. Well, I decide to let the towing company take a look at it (as I didn't really want that dealership touching it) and the conclusion they came to was that some bolts had been stripped, others hadn't been tightened down enough, and others were just missing.

Well, I managed to skate out of a 3k repair bill by the skin of my teeth. The original warranty I purchased sent someone to take a look at the engine and determine if it was something they should cover. They decided it was the fault of the Toyota Dealership (as they were the last people to touch the engine aside from those doing oil changes for me) and refuse to cover it. Well, after talking to the manager at the Toyota Dealership, he grudgingly agrees to take care of it, as it sounded like something that was the fault of someone there. They re manufacture the bent valves, the stripped bolts, replace the ones that are missing, and replaced the timing chain and various other parts that the renegade bolt destroyed. This took about another 2 months to get fixed.

I don't have any documentation from them to prove that they touched my engine this time (as I didn't pay for any of it, they were unwilling to give it to me) so I am not even going to consider calling them, as I can't afford to live without my car for that kind of time again. When I picked the car up, the engine sounded fine for about a week, but then it started to run a little choppier (but not making a terrible noise, or a similar one to the last 2 times)

3 months later, I think my car is starting to sound like its going to happen again soon. (Its a high pitched metal on metal clang, but I can't tell for sure when it is in park, and I haven't had an opportunity for someone to get in and put it in drive to be 100% sure)

I'm about ready to consider replacing the whole engine and be done with it. I won't be recieving any financial aid from the warranty company to do so. (That would be too easy, right?) So I'm trying to put it off for as long as possible. I was also considering taking it to another Toyota Dealership and getting it looked at again. However I'm a bit reluctant to do so, as I am afraid that when I tell them what has happened they will be mildly uncooperative, or at least cover up something the other dealership screwed up.

My questions are: What could possibly be so wrong with the engine to cause it to consistently happen? If it is a problem with the engine, would replacing it be an effective option? Or perhaps would I be better off getting rid of the darn thing and letting it be someone else's problem?
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Tuesday, December 15th, 2020 AT 8:32 AM (Merged)
Tiny
MHPAUTOS
  • EXPERT
Hi there,

Well this is a tale of woe. Frankly I would be replacing the engine, for my money this should have been done in the first instance, the less said about these used car warranty's the better, but thats another story, why this has failed again is a bit hard to tell, you really need to be able to inspect the engine first hand, but when an engine is damaged so severely, the stresses set up with in the engine is considerable, with stripped and damaged threads, you only need one of these repaired threads to not take the required torque and they will quickly loosen and, well you know the rest, if you want to keep the car, fit a re-co long engine and be done with that bucket of bolts under the bonnet.

Mark (mhpautos)
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Tuesday, December 15th, 2020 AT 8:32 AM (Merged)
Tiny
KEVINJ1987
  • MEMBER
Thank you for your timely response,

I'm having difficulty finding remanufactured engines that have a price tag on them. What kind of cost would be "reasonable" and do you have any suggestions as to a good location/website to get one?

I won't be replacing the engine immediately, however I'd rather not be scrambling to find a new one after the car has ceased functioning.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
+1
Tuesday, December 15th, 2020 AT 8:32 AM (Merged)
Tiny
MMPRINCE4000
  • EXPERT
Check the sticker on the front of hood area.

If engine says VVT-i it is a 1ZZFE Toyota engine.

Look at sticker for confirmation and when buying a used engine, always have the VIN of the car.

Check with local junkyards for cost, but I would think $1,000-2000.

You usually get these from wrecked cars (rear ended).

Sorry you had so much trouble, but generally these are very reliable engines.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Tuesday, December 15th, 2020 AT 8:32 AM (Merged)
Tiny
NATEROHMAN
  • MEMBER
  • 2002 TOYOTA COROLLA
  • 1.8L
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 110,000 MILES
Okay, well I have had trouble with my car trying to get it to run. I have been on this now for almost 3 weeks and to no avail. My problem was as I thought low compression because of out of spec cylinder bores, but now i'm wondering what the true issue is because I bought a short block from the wrecking yard because it had good compression and it checked out as in spec with my repair manuals specifications that's why I bought it because it passed the spec check. Anyway I get home and install the cylinder head while the engine is on a stand and I take my time with this because I want to make sure it's right the timing that is and I finish and everything looks good. So I turn the motor over using a ratchet by hand about 6 times or so and recheck my timing marks and they are as I set them and I can feel some compression as I turn it over after I installed the spark plugs, but it doesn't feel as strong as it did when this short block was in the car at the wrecking yard. Just as reference the cylinder head I also purchased out of the wrecking yard and it is in good shape too all valves had that grayish carbon coat on them that is telltale of a good running engine. I did however want to make sure that the valves were going to be reliable for me so I lapped them just to ensure that they would continue to operate properly down the road. Now i'm beginning to wonder if my timing is incorrectly set though because each one of these short blocks that I had in this car over the last three weeks has come back with the same compression reading just over 100 psi per give or take 5 psi. Although the first two measured out of spec but just barely out of spec the one i'm working with now should be compressing like it's supposed to these Toyota's wont run unless at least 145 psi is present and its supposed to be at like 215 or something if new or rebuilt. I thought I set the timing right still think I have but is there something anything I did wrong here maybe something to do with the intake VVTI cam gear? Please help because i'm about to throw a flare inside this car and be done with it.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Tuesday, December 15th, 2020 AT 8:32 AM (Merged)
Tiny
ASEMASTER6371
  • EXPERT
Hello again,

I know we discussed this before with the timing as the issue.

I attached the gear alignment for the cams and the crank.

Is this the way you set it?

The compression should be 140-160 I do not what manual you are referring to but this is reality and a lot of times, the reality is different than the book.

Roy
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
+1
Tuesday, December 15th, 2020 AT 8:32 AM (Merged)
Tiny
NATEROHMAN
  • MEMBER
Yes, that is the way I set it. The manual i'm using is a Haynes and it says that 218 psi is standard and 145 is minimum.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Tuesday, December 15th, 2020 AT 8:32 AM (Merged)
Tiny
ASEMASTER6371
  • EXPERT
The 218 is for a new car, not a car with tons of miles.

As I stated before 140-160 is the figure.

Did you air test the cylinders as I suggested before?

Roy
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
+1
Tuesday, December 15th, 2020 AT 8:32 AM (Merged)
Tiny
NATEROHMAN
  • MEMBER
I actually can't because I live in a community that is noise sensitive and I don't have a compressor here, but i'm going to get an air tank and do that next for the checking of any leaks anywhere. But if I crank the engine over for like a 15 count the compression will go up to 120 -125. But it should be stronger than that I used to get good readings on cars. I have previously worked on after a three count. Just out of curiosity what is your opinion on that? And thank you for the help by the way.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Tuesday, December 15th, 2020 AT 8:32 AM (Merged)
Tiny
ASEMASTER6371
  • EXPERT
You should have about 140. 100 is too low. You have to find the issue.

Roy
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
+1
Tuesday, December 15th, 2020 AT 8:32 AM (Merged)
Tiny
WILSAAW
  • MEMBER
  • 2000 TOYOTA COROLLA
  • 4 CYL
  • FWD
  • MANUAL
  • 124,000 MILES
Hi I had a strong slapping noise coming from the timing chain, so I took off the tensioner and the timing cover. Chain was loose(even b4 taking off tensioner), and I can move the tensioner pretty easily. Sounds like I needs the chain and the tensioner to be safe, but could you tell me how to re-time it, as far as the marks on the cams/crank/chain. Thanx.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Tuesday, December 15th, 2020 AT 8:32 AM (Merged)
Tiny
MATHIASO
  • EXPERT
Hello wilsaaw

What is your engine?

1NZ-FE Engines
1ZZ-FE Engines
2zz-Ge And 2zz-FE Engines
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
+2
Tuesday, December 15th, 2020 AT 8:32 AM (Merged)
Tiny
WILSAAW
  • MEMBER
It has the 1zz-fe engine.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
+4
Tuesday, December 15th, 2020 AT 8:32 AM (Merged)
Tiny
MATHIASO
  • EXPERT
Hello wilsaaw

1ZZ-FE Engines
Remove or disconnect the following:

Negative battery cable

Right engine cover

Accessory drive belt and generator

Power steering pump, without disconnecting the hoses

Right engine mount

Cylinder head cover

Turn the crankshaft so the No. 1 piston is at TDC on the compression stroke

Crankshaft pulley

Crankshaft position sensor from the timing chain cover

Accessory drive belt tensioner

Right engine mounting bracket

Chain tensioner

Water pump

Timing chain cover

Crankshaft angle sensor plate

Timing chain tensioner slipper

Timing chain and crankshaft timing sprocket

To install:

Crankshaft sprocket with timing chain. Be sure to align the No. 1 mark link with the mark on the sprocket


https://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/46384_0996b43f8022f83c_2.jpg



Timing chain on the camshaft sprockets. Align the Nos. 53 and 67 mark links with the marks on the camshaft sprockets


https://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/46384_0996b43f8022f83c_3.jpg



Chain tensioner slipper. Bolt: 14 ft. lbs. (18.5 Nm).

Crankshaft angle sensor plate

New seal in the front cover

Silicone sealant to the timing chain cover as illustrated

Timing chain cover

Water pump. Tighten the bolts marked -C- to 80 inch lbs. (9 Nm) and tighten the remaining bolts to 14 ft. lbs. (18.5 Nm). Be sure to install the bolts in their original locations. Bolt lengths:

1. A: 1.77 in. (45mm)

2. B: 1.38 in. (35mm)

3. C: 1.18 in. (30mm)

4. D: 0.98 in. (25mm)


https://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/46384_0996b43f8022f83c_4.jpg



Install or connect the following:

Right engine mounting bracket. Bolts, with sealant applied: 35 ft. lbs. (47 Nm).

Drive belt tensioner. Bolt: 51 ft. lbs. (69 Nm). Nut: 21 ft. lbs. (29 Nm).

Crankshaft position sensor. Tighten to 80 inch lbs. (9 Nm).

Crankshaft pulley. Bolt: 102 ft. lbs. (138 Nm).

Release the ratchet pawl and compress the chain tensioner. Place the hook on the pin to keep the tensioner compressed.


https://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/46384_0996b43f8022f83c_5.jpg



# Install the tensioner, using a new O-ring. Torque the bolts to 80 inch lbs. (9 Nm).

# Turn the crankshaft counterclockwise and remove the hook from the pin. Turn the crankshaft clockwise and be sure the slipper is pushed by the plunger.

# Check the valve timing by turning the crankshaft clockwise until the mark of the pulley is aligned with the mark on the timing chain cover. The marks on the camshaft sprockets should be facing each other as shown.

# Install or connect the following:

Silicone sealant to the 2 areas where the timing chain cover meets the cylinder head.

Cylinder head cover. Bolts with washers in the sequence shown: 80 inch lbs. (9 Nm). Bolts without washers: 96 inch lbs. (11 Nm).

Right engine mount. Bolts: Marked A : 47 ft. lbs. (64 Nm). Marked B : 19 ft. lbs. (26 Nm). Nut: 38 ft. lbs. (52 Nm).

Power steering pump

Alternator and drive belt

Right engine undercover

Negative battery cable

Washer tank

# Fill the cooling system to the proper level.

# Start the vehicle, check for leaks and repair if necessary.
hope this help.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
+2
Tuesday, December 15th, 2020 AT 8:32 AM (Merged)
Tiny
SL7RIPS
  • MEMBER
  • 2000 TOYOTA COROLLA
  • 4 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 145,000 MILES
Could a loose timing chain or other timing parts cause the 1zzfe to sound like a diesel truck when running. Also it will barely go over 20MPH
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Tuesday, December 15th, 2020 AT 8:32 AM (Merged)
Tiny
MMPRINCE4000
  • EXPERT
You can remove the valve cover and look at the chain with a light source. Look for broken teeth on the cam cogs.

Chains will generally last the life of the car, but they can go bad.

Do you have a check engine light? If so, what codes?
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Tuesday, December 15th, 2020 AT 8:32 AM (Merged)
Tiny
ALEXANDER58
  • MEMBER
  • 1998 TOYOTA COROLLA
1998 Toyota Corolla 4 cyl Automatic 114000 miles

My timing cover is leaking. The gasket has to be replaced. How do I do it?
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Tuesday, December 15th, 2020 AT 8:33 AM (Merged)
Tiny
BLUELIGHTNIN6
  • EXPERT
REMOVAL:
Disconnect the negative battery cable. Wait at least 90 seconds once the cable is disconnected to hinder air bad deployment.
Remove the right front wheel and engine under covers.
Slightly jack up the engine on the right side to remove the RH engine mount. Inspect the mount and replace if necessary.
Remove all drive belts.
Remove the valve cover.
While retaining the crankshaft pulley, remove the pulley bolt. Extract the crankshaft pulley using a puller.
Unbolt all three timing belt covers from the engine.

INSTALLATION:
Check that the timing belt gasket has no cracks or peeling. If the gasket is not reusable do the following:
Using a flat-bladed tool and gasket scraper, remove the old gasket material from the cover and mating area.
Thoroughly clean all components to remove all the loose material. Remove the backing paper from the new gasket and install the gasket evenly to the part of the cover shaded black in the illustration.
After installing the gasket, press down on it so it seats and the adhesive firmly sticks.
Install all three timing belt covers and tighten the bolts to 62 inch lbs. (7 Nm).
Install the new valve cover gasket and seal washers to the cylinder head cover.
Install the cylinder head cover to the cylinder head; secure with four cap nuts to 53 inch lbs. (6 Nm).
Install two PCV hoses to the valve cover; secure with hose clamps.
Attach the engine wiring harness to the valve cover, then install the engine wiring harness cover and secure to 53 inch lbs. (6 Nm).
Connect the wire and clamp to the alternator.
Install and adjust all the drive belts.
Install engine mount to body and secure but do not tighten fully. Tighten the following:
Mounting bracket-to-engine mount bolt to 47 ft. Lbs. (64 Nm)
Mounting bracket-to-engine mount nuts to 38 ft. Lbs. (52 Nm)
Engine mount-to-body bolt A to 19 ft. Lbs. (25 Nm)
Engine mount-to-body bolts B to 19 ft. Lbs. (25 Nm)
Engine mount-to-body bolt C to 19 ft. Lbs. (25 Nm), if equipped with cruise control.
Install the right engine undercover.
Install the right front wheel and lower the vehicle.
Connect the negative battery cable.
Start the engine and check the ignition timing. Inspect for leaks and check vehicle operation.

Thanks for using 2CarPros. Com!
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Tuesday, December 15th, 2020 AT 8:33 AM (Merged)
Tiny
DAVIDSCHAFFER
  • MEMBER
  • 1992 TOYOTA COROLLA
  • 1.6L
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 65,855 MILES
So we received a car from a guy for doing some work for him and the car sat in his driveway for almost 5 years. Upon putting a new battery in and trying to start it. It cranked but would not start. We put a little fuel in the throttle body and it fired up. So we assumed we had a fuel problem. We towed it home and started to work on it and clean it up. We replaced the fuel filter and we found a blown EFI fuse. We replaced but still would only crank but we still weren't getting fuel so we pulled the tank and removed the fuel pump and it did not work so we replaced it and cleaned the tank and flushed and cleaned the lines. Now we have plenty of fuel up to the front with still no start. Checking the ignition we had spark on four cylinders. But after watching some videos we thought maybe it wasn't strong enough so we replaced the ignition coil. Still no change in starting. We are at a loss. We also checked compression which was the same all across the board. So we have compression, we have spark, and the plugs are wet so we definitely have fuel. At a loss of what else it could possibly be. Please help.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Tuesday, December 15th, 2020 AT 8:33 AM (Merged)

Please login or register to post a reply.

Sponsored links