Making a whining noise. It will rev up real high and not go anywhere?

Tiny
BLAKLEY WILSON
  • MEMBER
  • 2003 DODGE CARAVAN
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 150,000 MILES
My van will crank and run but is making a whining noise. It will rev up real high and not go anywhere, and is not wanting to go into gear.
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Wednesday, August 26th, 2020 AT 5:04 PM

2 Replies

Tiny
KASEKENNY
  • EXPERT
If the transmission is acting like it is making this noise and not moving, I highly suspect you have a fluid issue. Either it is low or in such poor quality that it needs to be serviced. Let's start with checking the fluid and then service it and go from there.

The whining noise that you are hearing is most likely the pump sucking air and not fluid so I think it is low on fluid.

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/how-to-service-an-automatic-transmission

Let's start with this and go from there. Thanks
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Friday, May 21st, 2021 AT 3:04 PM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Hi,

It sounds like a transmission related issue. Have you checked the transmission fluid to make sure it is clean and full? Also, could you record the sound you hear and upload it for me to hear?

_____________________________

Here are the directions for checking fluid. The attached pics correlate with the directions.

_____________________________

2003 Dodge or Ram Truck Caravan V6-3.3L VIN R
Fluid Level and Condition Check
Vehicle Maintenance Fluids Fluid - A/T Service and Repair Procedures 40/41TE Fluid Level and Condition Check
FLUID LEVEL AND CONDITION CHECK
41TE - Automatic Trans-axle
FLUID LEVEL AND CONDITION CHECK

NOTE: Only transmission fluid of the type labeled Mopar ATF+4 (Automatic Transmission Fluid-Type 9602) should be used in this trans-axle.

FLUID LEVEL CHECK
The transmission sump has a fluid level indicator (dipstick) to check oil similar to most automatic transmissions. It is located on the left side of the engine. Be sure to wipe all dirt from dipstick handle before removing.

Pic 1

The torque converter fills in both the P Park and N Neutral positions. Place the selector lever in P Park to be sure that the fluid level check is accurate. The engine should be running at idle speed for at least one minute, with the vehicle on level ground. At normal operating temperature 82 C (180 F), the fluid level is correct if it is in the HOT region on the oil level indicator (Fig. 210). The fluid level should be within the COLD region of the dipstick at 27 C (80 F) fluid temperature.

FLUID LEVEL CHECK USING DRB

NOTE: Engine and Trans-axle should be at normal operating temperature before performing this procedure.

1. Start engine and apply parking brake.
2. Hook up DRB scan tool and select transmission.
3. Select sensors.
4. Read the transmission temperature value.

Pic 2

5. Compare the fluid temperature value with the fluid temperature chart (Fig. 211).
6. Adjust transmission fluid level shown on the indicator according to the chart.
7. Check transmission for leaks.

Low fluid level can cause a variety of conditions because it allows the pump to take in air along with the fluid. As in any hydraulic system, air bubbles make the fluid spongy, therefore, pressures will be low and build up slowly.

Improper filling can also raise the fluid level too high. When the trans-axle has too much fluid, the gears churn up foam and cause the same conditions, which occur with a low fluid level.

In either case, air bubbles can cause overheating and/or fluid oxidation, and varnishing. This can interfere with normal valve, clutch, and accumulator operation. Foaming can also result in fluid escaping from the trans-axle vent where it may be mistaken for a leak.

FLUID CONDITION
Along with fluid level, it is important to check the condition of the fluid. When the fluid smells burned, and is contaminated with metal or friction material particles, a complete trans-axle recondition is probably required. Be sure to examine the fluid on the dipstick closely. If there is any doubt about its condition, drain out a sample for a double check.

Mopar ATF+4 (Automatic Transmission Fluid Type 9602) when new is red in color. The ATF is dyed red so it can be identified from other fluids used in the vehicle such as engine oil or antifreeze. The red color is not permanent and is not an indicator of fluid condition. As the vehicle is driven, the ATF will begin to look darker in color and may eventually become brown. This is normal. ATF+4 also has a unique odor that may change with age. Consequently, odor and color cannot be used to indicate the fluid condition or the need for a fluid change.

After the fluid has been checked, seat the dipstick fully to seal out water and dirt.

_______________________________________

Let me know if this helps or if you have other questions.

Take care,
Joe
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Friday, May 21st, 2021 AT 3:04 PM

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