No spark

Tiny
SDEVINE
  • MEMBER
  • 1992 FORD RANGER
  • 2.3L
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • MANUAL
  • 150,000 MILES
I cannot get a spark in the ignition system, and have tried several things including testing and replacing all the components. I replaced the coils, ignition module, crank position sensor, relays, ECM. I checked the wires for shorts, I ran a diagnostic on the crank position sensor and the ignition module. The results for the ignition module were good, but the results on the brand new crank position sensor were unexpected. I tested the circuit where the signal on the CKP signal is supposed to go on-off, and it stays off. The test on the CID signal is supposed to go on-off-on-off, and it stays on. This is a brand new crank position sensor correctly installed. The test should result in an on/off or nothing at all. I double checked that the sensor is not touching the vanes on the position cup. The engine is getting fuel, but no spark. The engine failed suddenly, and I found the crank position sensor was mangled, so I thought that was the problem. I changed it twice with no resolution. Where else can I look, and what could cause the kind of test results I have received?
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Sunday, November 15th, 2020 AT 5:44 AM

3 Replies

Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
I attached a pic below (pic 1). You mentioned the OEM crank sensor was mangled. Did it damage the tone ring which signals the CKP?

I'm going to include the directions from the manual for replacing the crank sensor. Take a look through it and let me know if this is how it was done.

_____________________________

2002 Ford Truck Ranger 2WD L4-2.3L VIN D
Procedures
Vehicle Powertrain Management Sensors and Switches - Powertrain Management Sensors and Switches - Computers and Control Systems Crankshaft Position Sensor Service and Repair Procedures
PROCEDURES
Timing Peg, Crankshaft

pic 2

SPECIAL TOOL(S)

REMOVAL
1. Disconnect the battery ground cable.
2. Raise and support the vehicle.

Pic 3

3. Disconnect the Crankshaft Position (CKP) sensor electrical connector.

Pic 4

4. Remove the plug.

Pic 5

5. Install the special tool and turn the crankshaft pulley bolt to position the number one cylinder at top dead center.

Pic 6

6. Remove the CKP.

Pic 7

7. Install an M6 bolt.

INSTALLATION

pic 8

1. Install the CKP, but do not tighten the bolts at this time.

Pic 9

2. Adjust the CKP with the Crankshaft Position Sensor Alignment Jig and tighten the bolts.

Pic 10

3. Connect the CKP electrical connector.

Pic 11

4. Remove the M6 bolt.

Pic 12

5. Remove the Crankshaft Timing Peg.

Pic 13

6. Install the plug.

___________________________

Let me know.
Joe
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Sunday, November 15th, 2020 AT 5:26 PM
Tiny
SDEVINE
  • MEMBER
Joe, thank you. After looking carefully through these steps, I did replace the crank position sensor according to your recommendation. However, these instructions are for a 2002, and I have a 1992. So, mine has no pin the lock the crankshaft, and the sensor looks slightly different. I did examine the tone ring, and it was undamaged. That was my first thought too. Let me give you some history to make my situation clearer. When I got the truck as a basket case about 3 years ago, the timing belt was off and as I dug into it I found the tone ring was severely damaged as someone tried to pry off the harmonic balancer- to which it is attached. So I replaced it, and became acutely aware of its vulnerability and importance. I rebuild the engine about 2 years ago, and it ran beautifully. Last spring, it just up an quit on me for no apparent reason. I found it would start intermittently, so I thought it was electrical. After replacing every component with no success, I sent it to a mechanic I trusted. He had it 10 months with no success. While there, the crank position sensor was replaced- again. (I don't think it was needed, but they did it anyway) I think it was there that the sensor was installed wrong. After 10 months, I sent a tow truck over and had the truck brought to an electric system expert. They found bad gas and bad injectors- surprise surprise. After all that, they figured the ECU was bad, and replaced it. Again. Well it cranked right up and ran fine for a few weeks. However, the check engine light was on. It died suddenly without warning, and I had it towed home. I discovered the mangled sensor, replaced it, and still have no joy. So, as you can see, it has be through many hands and now I am trying to sort out this mess. So, the long way to answer your question, I did install the sensor correctly, and I replaced the ignition module and one of the coils. With the mangled sensor I got codes on the OBD1 scanner, and now they are gone, so I know that is correct. I checked the tone ring for any warping as well as damage, and it passes through the sensor with no issues or touching. Now, if it was touching, that would explain the erroneous test result, but it is not. Luckily, all these parts I replaced have a lifetime warranty, but we have to get to the bottom of the problem- I did replace the ignition module before I knew the sensor was bad. Could that damage the ignition module? Could the ECU have been damaged as well? This doesn't make sense to me as the sensor only sends a signal. Is there a way to test the sensor without it being plugged into the ignition module? I have to start at the bottom and verify everything is working right. I would like to test that sensor while it is installed in isolation of the rest of the system, verify its correct operation, then move upstream.
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Monday, November 16th, 2020 AT 5:11 AM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Hi,

I don't think you damaged anything more. However, I don't understand how the sensor was mangled again. If nothing is touching, it makes no sense other than if there is excessive end play in the crankshaft. When you rebuilt the engine, did you replace the crank, mains (thrust bearings) and confirm end play was within spec? Also, are you hearing the fuel pump turn on? It's been some time, but I know the EEC relay back in these years would fail and shut down spark and fuel. That is the circuit I would be inspected at this point, but the sensor issue needs to be solved first.

Let me know if you checked the end play. See pic 1.

Joe
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Monday, November 16th, 2020 AT 8:49 PM

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