1996 Jeep Cherokee T-kit radiator Flush

Tiny
CHEM8GUY
  • MEMBER
  • 1996 JEEP CHEROKEE
  • 6 CYL
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 125,000 MILES
My Jeep is overheating? I don't have a diagnosis. I'm going to change the thermostat, all associated hoses, and clutch fan. It might even be the water pump but I am not certain. However, I want to give my Jeep a REALLY good radiator flush FIRST. I'm having trouble with the T-kit which is what I want to use to flush because I hear this is the best.
Where do I connect the T?
Where does this hose go/connect from and to?

I read it's supposed to be on the heater core inlet hose.
On my Jeep the heater core is in front of the radiator and air blows through it first. The heater core has two hoses, the top heater core hose is connected to the heater core and the radiator. The bottom heater core hose is connected to the bottom somewhere near the engine but not sure. Anyhow, which hose do I use, the heater hose that connected from the heater core to the radiator or the one that is going somewhere near the engine.
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Friday, June 5th, 2009 AT 10:36 PM

7 Replies

Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
The heater core is under the dashboard. Look on the firewall of the jeep. You will see two smaller hoses running close together to the firewall. They attach to the heater core. You can use either one. The item infront of the radiator is either an AC component, oil cooler or trans cooler. Don't take it apart.

Let me know if you have other questions.

Joe
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Saturday, June 6th, 2009 AT 11:24 PM
Tiny
CHEM8GUY
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Thanks JacobandNicholas, that is an AC condenser in front of the radiator.

I'm still worried my Jeep may overheat and am even considering changing the radiator and water pump. After more research of course. I read my Manual and it said if the upper radiator hose is hot after the engine reaches operating temperature then that means the thermostat is still good.

I also read in the manual that if the upper radiator hose when squeezed at operating temperature releases a surge when squeezed and let go then there is nothing wrong with the water pump. I squeezed the upper radiator hose at operating temperature and it was hot and the hose was tight like water pressure was in it but I didn't feel any surge. But I took it that it might not be the water pump.

What it does seem like is that when I'm driving the engine gets warmer and warmer, and the clutch fan never turns on? ! When it does eventually turn on the temperature seems to get back to normal.

I know the thermostat, coolant temperature sensors control the clutch fan? Can anyone explain this to me. Why does the fan turn on so late.

Should I just change the clutch fan and plug in a new one with old sensors and plugs. I hear if I change the clutch fan I should also change the water pump together.

Thanks in advance.
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Monday, June 8th, 2009 AT 1:56 AM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
The pressure in the upper hose is normal. They would want you to have the cap off (when cold) so no pressure builds. That way, you could pinch the hose shut and then feel the coolant surge when released.
As far as the clutch fan, are you refering to an electric fan or a thermostatic fan clutch that bolts to the water pump and then a fan blade bolts to it? A thermo fan clutch is designed to basically lock the blade in when a particular temp is reached to cool the engine. WHen it's cool or cold out, the fan will turn but very slowly.

As far as an electric fan, the temperature sensor sends a signal to the fan relay when a particulat temo is reached then the relay sends power to the fan motor.

Based on what you described, it doesn't sound like a problem with the radiator or the water pump. It sounds more like a cooling fan problem. And if you have the fan clutch and it needs replaced, you don't need to replace the water pump. THe fan clutch bolts on to the waterpump. Unbolt it and replace the clutch only unless you know the pump is bad. In this case, I don't think it is.

Let me know if you have other questions.

Joe
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Monday, June 8th, 2009 AT 4:15 PM
Tiny
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Thanks again for all the help.

My fan clutch looks like a heat sensitive bi-metal spring type. It has a plug connected to it? What is this plug and where does it go? Is there anything else that I might need to change associated with the fan clutch itself.

Also, I can not find the engine coolant drain plug to do the radiator flush. The manual says it is located on the drivers side of the engine block underneath the exhaust manifold. Will I have to remove the exhaust manifold? I'm lost.
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Wednesday, June 10th, 2009 AT 12:45 PM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Is it possible for you to take a picture of the plug you are refering to? I can't picture it. Also, the manual is correct, the drain for the block is below the manifold. It isn't a large bolt, so maybe you missed it.

The reason I asked for the picture is because you described two things to me. The thermo clutch fan doesn't require electric, but you said it had a plug. I appologize for being a pain, but I'm confused at this point. A picture would help.

Thanks,
Joe
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Wednesday, June 10th, 2009 AT 2:04 PM
Tiny
CHEM8GUY
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Sorry, I'm so much trouble. This is a learning experience. My Mechanical fan with viscous clutch is fine. It runs all the time. I have been confused and that is what probably is confusing you.

It is the electric fan I was trying to talk about which you mentioned that only engages after a certain temperture.

The electric fan eventually turns on but really late. It could be the coolant temperature switch, wiring( or RelaY). I sure hope it's that switch which they call an IAF. It looks like an easy job.

I'm going to flush the radiator, change switch, and find a leak. My water pump looks good. Could it be that a leak or pressure loss from a leak is causing the coolant temperature switch to malfunction since temperature changes. It would seem that at a lower pressure from a cooling system leak that the temperature would have to be higher to account for the loss in pressure causing the cooling temperature sensor to engage at higher temperatures. PV=nrT from chemistry. Pressure is directly proportional to temperature.
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Friday, June 12th, 2009 AT 2:19 AM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Yes, it could be the temp switch. Infact, that is where I would start. If it sends the signal later than it should, the fan won't come on until then causing the temp to raise and then drop when it comes on. Let me know if it works.

Joe

PS: Don't worry about asking questions. That is why we are here.
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Saturday, June 13th, 2009 AT 12:14 PM

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