1995 Honda Civic Radiator/Water Pump Issues

Tiny
JESSCALDWELL3781
  • MEMBER
  • 1995 HONDA CIVIC
  • 6 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 27,000 MILES
Last night as I was driving home, my car began to overheat and this QUICKLY escalated to the meter going into the "red zone" and steam pouring out. Replaced water in radiator and bought new radiator cap. Everything was FINE for the 30 mile drive home. No leaks at all. Drove 40 miles this morning, everything was fine. Suddenly when I parked, water/antifreeze was profusely dripping from under the car. Replaced water and drove home again. Only to have to put more water in the radiator after 35ish miles. When I finally returned home, the car is no longer leaking. Refilled radiator completely and drove 10 miles, came back home, and NO LEAKS at all. I have absolutely no clue what is wrong! Someone suggested this may be the water pump, but we are just not sure at all. What do you think this is? And what would be the cost of replacing the seal in the water pump?
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Tuesday, March 16th, 2010 AT 7:40 PM

3 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
The repair involves replacing the water pump, not just the seal. I would recommend looking at the electric radiator fan first. If the engine does not overheat on the highway, where there is plenty of air flow, but it does overheat at slow speeds, city stop and go driving, or when stopped, it suggests the fan is not turning on. It certainly should be running if coolant is boiling out.

Caradiodoc
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Tuesday, March 16th, 2010 AT 7:50 PM
Tiny
JESSCALDWELL3781
  • MEMBER
No, it is overheating on the interstate at high speeds as well.
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Tuesday, March 16th, 2010 AT 7:54 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
In that case, I would head to your mechanic and ask him to perform the "sniffer" test to check for a leaking head gasket. The test involves drawing air from the radiator through a glass tube filled with two chambers of dark blue liquid. If combustion gases are getting into the cooling system, the liquid will turn bright yellow.

Also check how hot the air is coming from the heater. If it is cool or just warm when the engine overheats, coolant flow is being disrupted. That could be due to an air pocket caused by the leaking head gasket, a loose belt driving the water pump, or a thermostat stuck closed. (Thermostats only open in response to hot liquid, not hot air).

Caradiodoc
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Tuesday, March 16th, 2010 AT 8:46 PM

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