2000 Honda Accord

Tiny
FREDDY C
  • MEMBER
  • 2000 HONDA ACCORD
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 30,000 MILES
I smell gasoline odors, in the area of the rear wheel driver's side, after the car has been driven for a short distance. No gasoline odors are smelled in the trunk nor inside the car. The fuel tank and fuel tank hoses appear to ok. There are no wet spots either. Gasoline odors are not smelled when the car is parked. Where are the fumes coming from? Do they present a hazard? Any advice on its repari?

Regards
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Monday, December 15th, 2008 AT 3:54 AM

14 Replies

Tiny
JAMES W.
  • MEMBER
The next time you stop the car after a drive, walk back and open the gas cap and see if you have pressure in the tank. Also, does the cap seal tight?
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Monday, December 15th, 2008 AT 8:18 AM
Tiny
FREDDY C
  • MEMBER
I drove around the block a couple of times (about 5 minutes) and did not notice any pressure in the gas tank. Should I drive some more?

The gas tank cap seals tight.

The odor can be smelled as if coming from beneath the car. Please let me know if you need additional information.

Regards.
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Monday, December 15th, 2008 AT 9:25 AM
Tiny
JAMES W.
  • MEMBER
You may have to drive farther to generate any pressure, IF, this is the problem. You may want to check under the hood also, just for the heck of it. A small "weeping" leak will evaporate almost as fast as it leaks. It doesn't take much of a leak to stink to high heaven.
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Monday, December 15th, 2008 AT 9:56 AM
Tiny
FREDDY C
  • MEMBER
1. Ok I will try to drive farther later this afternoon. Will get back on this. Right now the gas tank is half full.

2. Any suggestions of where to look under the hood?

3. I am enclosing a photo of the general area where the gasoline is smelled. In general the smell is stronger when the gas pedal is stepped on.


http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/286576_IMG_2587_1.jpg



http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/286576_IMG_2582_1.jpg



Regards and thanks
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Monday, December 15th, 2008 AT 10:34 AM
Tiny
JAMES W.
  • MEMBER
Thanks for the photos. They always help clarify. The weep or leak has to be in that area somewhere. I would be suspicious of the connection for the overflow(small) tube at the tank.
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Monday, December 15th, 2008 AT 11:10 AM
Tiny
FREDDY C
  • MEMBER
Hi,

I drove this morning about 20 miles. No pressure in gasoline tank !

No leaks were observed under the hood nor were smells detected in the front end of the car after the test drive.

Regards.
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Tuesday, December 16th, 2008 AT 8:14 AM
Tiny
JAMES W.
  • MEMBER
OK, we're back to the overflow tube from the tank, or one of the rubber connections that hold the tubes in place. It may be the connection on the fuel return line to the tank, but I doubt it. Reguardless, the only way you will know for sure is to drop the tank so you can see whats going on. It looks pretty warm and sunny where you live, according to your pictures, so I wouldn't think "rust" would be an issue.
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Tuesday, December 16th, 2008 AT 1:28 PM
Tiny
FREDDY C
  • MEMBER
Good morning,

I am enclosing two photos of the hoses coming out of the gas tank. I presume the overflow tank is the thick copper tube. Am I correct ? Please correct me if I am wrong.

Do you suggest taking the gas tank off?

Gasoline odors can be smelled mostly near the two hoses coming out the gas tank.

Rust is not a problem. The gas tank bottom looks fairly good.

Regards and thanks for your prompt and appreciated replies.


http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/286576_IMG_2588_1.jpg


http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/286576_IMG_2591_1.jpg

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Wednesday, December 17th, 2008 AT 10:02 AM
Tiny
BRUCE HUNT
  • EXPERT
The small one is the overflow. The other is the filler tube that you put the gas in with. By the looks of the picture, someone has been working on this and replaced the tube and clamps. Was that you?
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Wednesday, December 17th, 2008 AT 1:58 PM
Tiny
FREDDY C
  • MEMBER
Good afternoon. I have had two mechanics of separate shops look at the problem without success. One of the mechanics said he replaced the clamps of the overflow hose. The other mechanic reported not finding any liquid gasoline leaks.

Should I request the replacement of the overflow hose?

Kind regards and thanks for the prompt reply.
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Wednesday, December 17th, 2008 AT 4:13 PM
Tiny
FREDDY C
  • MEMBER
Good morning gentlemen:

I would like to make to reference to Mr. Weizel's kind message of Dec 16 in which he recommends to "drop the tank so you can see what's going on". Please advice on what I should be looking for?

Any part in particular?

Regards and happy holidays.
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Thursday, December 18th, 2008 AT 9:43 AM
Tiny
JAMES W.
  • MEMBER
Was just going through some previous postings and was wondering if you ever solved the fuel smell problem.
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Wednesday, December 31st, 2008 AT 10:55 PM
Tiny
FREDDY C
  • MEMBER
Mr. Weizel, Happy New Year

No, the problem remains. My mechanic replaced the overload hose and the smell continues. Please advice what we should look for if we take the fuel tank off.

Regards.
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Thursday, January 1st, 2009 AT 8:14 AM
Tiny
JAMES W.
  • MEMBER
Let's try an old "indian trick", no racial pun intended. Try putting a little pressure in the tank with an air hose. I've used a blow gun with a rag wrapped around it, being careful not to use too much pressure, and spray the tank and connections down liberally with soapy water. If you hit an air leak, you should see bubbles. Let me know what you find.
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Friday, January 2nd, 2009 AT 11:42 AM

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