Engine not starting

Tiny
TYENDAGA
  • MEMBER
  • 2002 DODGE INTREPID
  • 2.7L
  • 6 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 220,000 MILES
Hello. So I have a real head scratcher. I have the vehicle listed above it is a V6 engine with a VIN code R. The engine has been beautifully maintained with Castrol GTX oil every 3,000 miles and Lucas oil stabilizer every, 6000. Tuneups and so on. I take pride in my work. However, I noticed a slight noise in the engine that resembled a possible bent valve. Without running the car too long as to cause additional damage and with the miles to go, I decided to rebuild the heads with new guides, seats, seals, valves, springs, gaskets, etc. Keeping in mind that the engine was running fine prior to working on it. I spend a long time maliciously cleaning and prepping each part for re-assembly. Figuring that the depth of exposed parts, I decided to replace other components as well while I was that far into it. Therefore, I also replaced the water pump, oil pump, timing system (complete) and valve train components. Looking at the pistons, I did not work any on the lower end as I had no blow-by or cylinder wall groves. Cross pattern on the walls were still present. I did however change the oil pan gasket and inspected the rod arm bearings which appeared to be in good order. Everything was top notch for the miles it had. Even the cam lobes showed no signs of wear. So I began the reassembly process. Torqued each bolt to Chrysler spec and reconnected every wire that was disconnected. I also pre-lubed all moving parts with a touch of oil to prevent dry-start. So here is where it gets weird: when I started the car for initial run, it cranked over just fine with a full battery charge but would not start. I still heard chatter as one would with new parts but being pre-oiled, I immediately thought the worst and thought the timing might have "jumped" somehow. Without over exerting the engine, I rechecked the timing system and even reset it once again just to make sure everything was as it should. Every mark dead on tooth for tooth. Put it all back together and still the same. No start. Checked the plugs with a proper testing tool and I confirmed that the plugs we in fact firing correctly. Rechecked all connections and all is tight and secure. Checked oil for milk and none was present indicating proper head gasket seating. No codes were present from a ODBII meter. So, I thought because the fuel rail/injector system was drained during the rebuild process that the system may need primed. I sprayed starting fluid in the intake and the car did start and run as long as I kept spraying fluid in the intake. However, once the fluid burned off, the car would stall and die. Taking the intake off to inspect the injectors, I noticed that they were not spraying any fuel. I double checked the connections and traced all wires for brakes or damage. None was noticeable. I checked all the ground straps and used my multi-meter to check for voltage, continuity, etc. All appeared to be within spec. But still no gas. The pumps engages each time the key is turned to the "on" position so I'm sure it is not the pump or line obstruction. I also checked to make sure the pressure valve-to-fuel rail was depressed allowing fuel into the rail itself. Again, the car was running fine before working on it. So, the question is: With proper firing, compression, voltage, and every test imaginable, (Including fuses and relays)would anyone have thoughts as to why the injectors would all of a sudden stop firing? The only thing I have not checked was the fusible link. But I figured that would deal more with ignition coils which run fine. Thank you in advance for your thoughts and time in this quandary. Oh, and one more thing. Yes there is gas in the tank. Lol
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Monday, March 13th, 2017 AT 10:52 AM

5 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Have you tried holding the accelerator pedal down 1/4"?

Forget the water in the oil. That is by far the least common symptom of a leaking cylinder head gasket.
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Monday, March 13th, 2017 AT 5:49 PM
Tiny
TYENDAGA
  • MEMBER
Thank you for your reply. I feel really stupid as I found the culprit to my problem. The metal "Y" pipe at the top end that splits off and feeds the two fuel rails were indeed connected correctly to the rails themselves. However, the other end that connects to the feed supply line had come slightly lose from the disconnect thus engaging the in-line safety shut off valve. Once I pressed the connector together, I heard the system pressurize and wallah! Fuel flows once again! It was one of those "Doh" moments. However, once the car came alive, after doing all that work mentioned in the original post, I still heard the "2.7 tick" noise. I thought maybe a compressed adjuster or even a valve somehow pinging off the head (which is what it sounded like) as the 2.7 is an EER Interference engine. After looking into other options, I decided to take one last look at something I have not checked yet, rod bearings. Sure enough, spun a bearing. Two actually, the number three and number six cylinders were lose. Well, I know what I am doing tomorrow! Lol I figure if you are going to do one, might as well replace them all. Hopefully, after all this, I will be one of the lucky ones that has a Chrysler 2.7l with 220,000 original miles that runs like a brand new engine! We shall see. I will post some pictures when I am done.
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Monday, March 13th, 2017 AT 11:57 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Dandy. As a point of interest, one of the reasons I originally became a Chrysler fan in the mid '70s was their amazing parts interchangeability between years and models. That carries over to your car. You can install the much better 3.5L engine in place of the 2.7L. The 2.7L is known for bad rod bearings and oiling issues. A friend dumped a 3.5L into his mother's car, and only had to slightly modify the exhaust on one side. Same Engine Computer. Same wiring harness. Same mounts.

Be sure to check the crankshaft journals. If only the bearings are worn down, you should be okay. I chased an elusive light knock in the 3.0L in my '88 Grand Caravan many years ago, and replaced the main and rod bearings as a test. Never did solve the knock, but that engine lasted another 175,000 miles. The van rusted apart with 420,000 on the engine, ... And it still knocks. (I'm searching for another rust-free '88 Grand Caravan with 15" wheels from down south).
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Tuesday, March 14th, 2017 AT 6:07 PM
Tiny
TYENDAGA
  • MEMBER
This is good to know. I was actually planning on doing a 3.5 swap later this summer. I too am a fan of the Gen 2 Intrepid as it "fits" me very well. I am a rather small person but personality wise, well, I like this car. It has always reminded me of "The Wraith" car from the movie. I did not, however, know that the swap was so easy with same PCM/ECU and harness, mounts, etc being the same. That's incredible! Makes my job that much easier. I was also looking at body mods but aside from Andy's Auto Sports they are lacking in options especially the front bumper skin. I'm rather old school and not big on turbo, chips, loud mufflers, etc as I consider that "Steroids in a can". I more prefer "raw muscle" from the engine itself. If a team has to use drugs to win, then even if they do win, they still didn't win. Know what I mean? But a 3.5 is truly more muscle over a 2.7 without the "drugs". Well, once the engine is done, then it's on to the body.
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Wednesday, March 15th, 2017 AT 12:49 PM
Tiny
KEN
  • ADMIN
Good to hear, please use 2CarPros anytime we are here to help.

Best, Ken
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Saturday, March 18th, 2017 AT 8:05 AM

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