'99 Taurus engine into a '98 Taurus

Tiny
RAGNAROK628
  • MEMBER
  • 1999 FORD TAURUS
Hi I have a wrecked '99 taurus (engine area unaffected) and a '98 taurus with a thrown rod. My question is: is it possible and advisable to go ahead and get the good '99 engine put into the '98? What would that cost? I do not consider myself capable of doing this and I can't find any information online about what the flat-rate for such an engine transfer would be. Has anyone else done this or have access to the flat-rate manual? Or am I just opening a can of worms with this?
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Thursday, July 6th, 2006 AT 10:49 AM

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Tiny
TAURUSWHEEL
  • MEMBER
If the calibration of the engines are not the same, you're looking for problems, the pcm in the receiving car may not be able to accurately monitor and control the engine performance, not saying it wouldn't half-assed run, however there may be issues which would prevent it from passing, if you need to, emission testing, sounds risky to me.
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Thursday, July 6th, 2006 AT 9:08 PM
Tiny
RAGNAROK628
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Not sure what a pcm is.
But you're saying that it's not the same engine? I know people change the engines in cars all the time, I figured as long as the engine fits, it's all good, especially since it seems like it's pretty much the same engine. I don't need to pass an emissions test I don't think, but I don't want to spend money doing this if it only half-assed runs. Thanks for the help.
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Friday, July 7th, 2006 AT 3:24 PM
Tiny
TAURUSWHEEL
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PCM is powertrain control module, the brains of your vehicle, what I'm saying about calibrations are this: the engines must have the identical components installed on each in order for that particular pcm is properly run the vehicle, just because each is a 3.0 or whatever really has no bearing on anything, the days of swapping out engines, firing it up and driving away into the sunset, are no longer as easy as it used to be, yeah you can put another engine of the same size in there, it'll most likely run. Run optimum, that's another story. Research the info you need, calibration sticker should be on the engines somewhere, get the codes and consult the dealer to see if you can do it properly, why would you want a car that runs, but doesn't run optimally?
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Friday, July 7th, 2006 AT 11:50 PM
Tiny
RAGNAROK628
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Thanks a lot for your help. I've looked and both engines are 3.0 L SFI Vulcan V6 engines. I don't mean do beat this into the ground, but are you saying these are not the same engine? And exactly how sub-optimally would it perhaps run?
I only need an A to B vehicle right now until I graduate in a year, I really only want to get by with spending as little as possible and i'm basically hoping that I can get a working vehicle this way for less then buying another car. My other option that i'm favoring is a '91 honda civic for a lil under 2K. Looks like i'll have to do that if my engine swap scheme will result in a car that runs like crap.
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Saturday, July 8th, 2006 AT 11:58 AM
Tiny
TAURUSWHEEL
  • MEMBER
Same engine, possible different emission calibration, it's not the mechanicals of the engine to be concerned about, it's the specs for the emission controls, etc. I would check with the local Ford dealer, get his take on engine swaps. From the service manual:

Each vehicle has a decal (Figures 1, 2 and 3) containing emission control information that applies specifically to the vehicle and engine. The specifications on the decal are critical to servicing emissions systems.
In addition to the tune-up specifications and procedures, the emission decal shows a color-coded (shown in black and white) schematic of the engine vacuum system. The color coding on the schematic represents the actual color coding on the vacuum hoses. However, there will be instances when a hose color does not match the color on the decal.

Decal Location

Typical location of the decal will be on the underside of the hood or the radiator support sight shield.
Powertrain Base Calibration Information

Powertrain Base Calibration Information is located in the lower right corner of the Vehicle Certification Label. Only the Base Calibration will appear on this label (Figure 3). The Revision Level is no longer printed on the label, however it can be found in On-Line Automotive Service Information System (Oasis). For the 1999 model year Ford Motor Company is using two different Protocols which describe Powertrain Base Calibration. The Protocols are designed to provide worldwide standardization for vehicle calibration. If electronic engine control strategy is carried over to the 1999 model year from 1998, Protocol 1 is used (see Table 1 below). New strategies for the 1999 model year use Protocol 2 (see Table 2 below). For more information on Vehicle Certification Label, refer to the Workshop Manual.

Figure 3: Typical Vehicle Certification Label with Powertrain Calibration Information

Decal Location

Typical location of Vehicle Certification label is on LH door or door post pillar.

I would guess that it's certainly probable that the car would run, not saying it would run like crap, only the chance that it's going to possibly create some headaches where in the end you would have wished you hads purchased a complete ready-to-run vehicle. If you don't have the need to pass emission testing for vehicle inspection or whatever, that's a plus in your favor.
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Saturday, July 8th, 2006 AT 12:54 PM
Tiny
RAGNAROK628
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Ok thanks alot for the info man. Definately some things to look into.
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Saturday, July 8th, 2006 AT 1:24 PM
Tiny
TAURUSWHEEL
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Np prob, I understand your situation, just trying to give you some info.
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Saturday, July 8th, 2006 AT 5:26 PM

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