Low Compression

Tiny
DSCHALLA
  • MEMBER
  • DODGE NEON
Hello I have a 98 Dodge Neon with a 2.0L SOHC with about 60,000 Miles. The head gasket was replaced about 20,000 miles ago.

I had the vehicle stored for a few weeks and when I went to start it to move it, the car turned over but didn't start. I turned the key off and tried again and when it turned over it sounded like it didn't have compression. I thought the timing belt broke or jumped but after removing the cover I found the timing marks still line up and the belt is fine. I since did a compression test and found that the lowest cylinder is 50lbs and the highest is 65lbs.

I am thinking probably the head gasket has gone again but am wondering why I would have problems with all 4 cylinders. I would hate to pull the head and find something else is the problem.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you
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Sunday, June 17th, 2007 AT 4:26 PM

4 Replies

Tiny
JACK42
  • MEMBER
What has probably happened is the timing belt has been stripped of its teeth around the crank gear. Still in one piece, but not moving the cam. Have someone crank it and verify that the cam moves. Be aware that it might move if the bottom gear happens to catch a good spot, but comp will be low and cam/ crank timing will be off
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Thursday, June 21st, 2007 AT 8:02 AM
Tiny
DSCHALLA
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Thanks for your reply.

I will double check that tonight but I don't think that is the case because my timing marks seem to line up. I turned over with a ratchet and all the teeth seemed intact.

If the timing jumped one notch would I have that low compression?
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Thursday, June 21st, 2007 AT 8:15 AM
Tiny
JACK42
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Its possible, but you said the marks still line up.
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Thursday, June 21st, 2007 AT 6:09 PM
Tiny
INTEGRITY AUTO CARE
  • MEMBER
I see this is an old post, but I ran across it in search of some information on something else. I would suggest that you squirt oil in the cylinders and then do your compression test again. If you have not disabled the fuel injectors then they will continue injecting fuel as you do the compression test thereby washing down the oil from the cylinder walls and rings and causing them not to seal as well. Thus low compression on all cylinders. I'm sure you have since resolved this issue since it was so long ago, but I am curious as to what you eventually found out. Update?
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Tuesday, September 11th, 2012 AT 2:43 PM

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