Brake bleeding instructions needed

Tiny
TIMBRIGHT
  • MEMBER
  • 2013 FORD FUSION
  • 1.6L
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 74,000 MILES
Had the rear left caliper lock up, so I replaced. While bleeding the brakes fluid came out of the parking brake motor that is attached to the caliper. I already assume that part needs replaced so I will do it. However my question is, I have read the car needs to be running to bleed the brakes, I have never done it that way. Should they be bleed when the car is off or while it is running?
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Friday, March 29th, 2019 AT 4:21 PM

21 Replies

Tiny
JOETECHPRO
  • EXPERT
Hey TIMBRIGHT,

I will attach the instructions to replace the rear caliper.

They advise you deactivate the park brake before doing this so I will also add the procedure for this. You will need to reactivate after fitting.

For bleeding I will also add the section on brake bleeding, it looks like you just need to activate the park brake a few times to remove all the air from the caliper. You may need to start the engine to do this but it should work with just ignition on.

The bleeding part you do not need the engine on for.

Hope this is everything you need but any further questions please do not hesitate to ask.

Regards, Joe
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Friday, March 29th, 2019 AT 6:45 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
That has to do with the power assist. Here is a video and guide below to help you bleed the brake system correctly.

https://youtu.be/w7gUsj2us0U

and

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/how-to-bleed-or-flush-a-car-brake-system

and

https://youtu.be/WDxvEQrMkBg

Please run down these guides and report back.

The bigger problem is you need the power assist when pedal-bleeding with a helper. That method is rarely used by a professional. We use gravity-bleeding where the bleeder screws are opened, the reservoir cap is loosened, then we wait for brake fluid to show up at the wheels. Once all the bleeder screws are closed, "irritate" the brake pedal by hand a little to wash any remaining bubbles into the calipers and wheel cylinders. Open each bleeder screw once more to burp those few remaining bubbles. Add brake fluid to the reservoir as appropriate, and you're done.

Pedal-bleeding can be used but the mistake most people make is the helper pushes the pedal all the way to the floor. No professional will ever do that. Crud and corrosion build up in the lower halves of the bores where the pistons don't normally travel in the master cylinder. Pushing the pedal over half way runs the rubber lip seals over that crud and can rip them. This shows up as a slowly-sinking brake pedal, and it often takes two or three days to show up. The fix for that is to replace the master cylinder.
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Friday, March 29th, 2019 AT 6:51 PM
Tiny
TIMBRIGHT
  • MEMBER
Okay, after replacing the caliper and the electronic brake motor, I found that the new caliper has a defect causing it leak out the back of the caliper. Caliper again replaced and problem is fixed.
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Friday, April 5th, 2019 AT 6:35 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Dandy. That's the second Fusion rear caliper problem this week. Happy to hear you solved it.
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Friday, April 5th, 2019 AT 8:16 PM
Tiny
DAN1971PEACHER
  • MEMBER
  • 2011 FORD FUSION
  • 2.5L
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 219,000 MILES
I recently changed the ABS pump on my car. Now I am trying to bleed the system to get all the air out. It would seem that I have air trapped in the pump or valve body which won't allow me to get any brake pedal or pressure at all. I do not own a scan tool so I'm trying to do this the old fashion way but I'm not having any luck. Could you please help me by telling me how to bleed the air out of the pump/module body?
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Friday, April 9th, 2021 AT 2:08 PM (Merged)
Tiny
ASEMASTER6371
  • EXPERT
Good morning,

There is no other way to bleed it except with a scan tool. The scan tool opens all the solenoids and allows the air out of the system.

Roy

Hydraulic Control Unit (HCU) Bleeding

WARNING: Do not use any fluid other than clean brake fluid meeting manufacturer's specification. Additionally, do not use brake fluid that has been previously drained. Following these instructions will help prevent system contamination, brake component damage and the risk of serious personal injury.

WARNING: Carefully read cautionary information on product label. For EMERGENCY MEDICAL INFORMATION seek medical advice. In the USA or Canada on Ford/Motorcraft products call: 1-800-959-3673. For additional information, consult the product Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) if available. Failure to follow these instructions may result in serious personal injury.

WARNING: Do not allow the brake master cylinder to run dry during the bleeding operation. Master cylinder may be damaged if operated without fluid, resulting in degraded braking performance. Failure to follow this instruction may result in serious personal injury.

NOTICE: Do not spill brake fluid on painted or plastic surfaces or damage to the surface may occur. If brake fluid is spilled onto a painted or plastic surface, immediately wash the surface with water.

NOTE: When any part of the hydraulic system is disconnected for repair or installation of new components, air can get into the system and cause spongy brake pedal action. This requires bleeding of the hydraulic system after it is correctly connected.

All vehicles

1. Use the Pressure Bleeding procedure to bleed the system. For additional information, refer to Brake System Bleeding.

2. Connect the scan tool and follow the ABS HCU Hydraulic Control Unit (HCU) bleeding instructions.

3. Repeat the Pressure Bleeding procedure to bleed the system.

Hybrid vehicles

4. Following the scan tool instructions, carry out the Multi-Calibration Routine.
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Friday, April 9th, 2021 AT 2:08 PM (Merged)
Tiny
BMDOUBLE
  • EXPERT
The brake system on the Fusion must be pressure bled or else you will chase your tail for days.
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Friday, April 9th, 2021 AT 2:08 PM (Merged)
Tiny
JOBRAIRA
  • MEMBER
  • 2010 FORD FUSION
  • 2.5L
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 135,000 MILES
I replaced the master cylinder after I purge the new one, installed and started the bleeding process from the front wheels, but when I open after three times pumped with the pedal and maintaining the pedal all the way to the floor. No fluid comes out from the bleeding ports and I pumped the master cylinder like 10 times of 3.

I do not understand why fluid is not coming from the bleeders, no pressure, nothing. And pedal goes all the way to the floor.
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Friday, April 9th, 2021 AT 2:08 PM (Merged)
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Welcome to 2CarPros.

Due to the complexity of the fluid path within the hydraulic system, it is necessary to pressure bleed the system. To make things worse, it requires specific software. Here are the directions:

________________________

2010 Ford Fusion FWD L4-2.5L
Brake System Bleeding
Vehicle Brakes and Traction Control Hydraulic System Brake Bleeding Service and Repair Procedures Brake System Bleeding
BRAKE SYSTEM BLEEDING
Brake System Bleeding

picture 1

picture 2

Pressure Bleeding

WARNING: Do not use any fluid other than clean brake fluid meeting manufacturer's specification. Additionally, do not use brake fluid that has been previously drained. Following these instructions will help prevent system contamination, brake component damage and the risk of serious personal injury.

WARNING: Carefully read cautionary information on product label. For EMERGENCY MEDICAL INFORMATION seek medical advice. In the USA or Canada on Ford/Motorcraft products call: 1-800-959-3673. For additional information, consult the product Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) if available. Failure to follow these instructions may result in serious personal injury.

WARNING: Do not allow the brake master cylinder to run dry during the bleeding operation. Master cylinder may be damaged if operated without fluid, resulting in degraded braking performance. Failure to follow this instruction may result in serious personal injury.

NOTICE: Do not spill brake fluid on painted or plastic surfaces or damage to the surface may occur. If brake fluid is spilled onto a painted or plastic surface, immediately wash the surface with water.

NOTE: When any part of the hydraulic system has been disconnected for repair or installation of new components, air can get into the system and cause spongy brake pedal action. This requires bleeding of the hydraulic system after it has been correctly connected.

NOTE: Due to the complexity of the fluid path within the rear integral parking brake calipers, it is necessary to press and release the parking brake during the bleed procedure.

NOTE: The Hydraulic Control Unit (HCU) bleeding procedure must be carried out if the HCU or any components upstream of the HCU are installed new.

All vehicles

1. Clean all the dirt from around the brake fluid reservoir cap and remove the cap. Fill the brake master cylinder reservoir with clean, specified brake fluid.

Pic 3

2. NOTE: Master cylinder pressure bleeder adapter tools are available from various manufacturers of pressure bleeding equipment. Follow the instructions of the manufacturer when installing the adapter.

Install the bleeder adapter to the brake master cylinder reservoir and attach the bleeder tank hose to the fitting on the adapter.

3. NOTE: Make sure the bleeder tank contains enough specified brake fluid to complete the bleeding operation.

Open the valve on the bleeder tank.

- Apply 207-345 kPa (30-50 psi) to the brake system.

4. Remove the RH rear bleeder cap and place a box-end wrench on the bleeder screw. Attach a rubber drain tube to the RH rear bleeder screw and submerge the free end of the tube in a container partially filled with clean, specified brake fluid.

5. Loosen the RH rear bleeder screw. Leave open until clear, bubble-free brake fluid flows, then tighten the RH rear bleeder screw.
- Press and release the parking brake 5 times.

- Repeat until clear, bubble-free fluid comes out.

6. Tighten the RH rear bleeder screw to specifications, refer to Specifications. Remove the rubber hose and install the bleeder screw cap.

7. Repeat Steps 4 through 6 for the LH rear brake caliper.

8. Remove the RH front bleeder cap and place a box-end wrench on the bleeder screw. Attach a rubber drain tube to the RH front bleeder screw and submerge the free end of the tube in a container partially filled with clean, specified brake fluid.

9. Loosen the RH front bleeder screw. Leave open until clear, bubble-free brake fluid flows, then tighten the RH front bleeder screw.

10. Tighten the LH rear bleeder screw to specifications, refer to Specifications. Remove the rubber hose and install the bleeder screw cap.

11. Repeat Steps 8 through 10 for the LH front brake caliper.

12. Close the bleeder tank valve and release the pressure. Remove the tank hose from the adapter and remove the adapter. Fill the reservoir with clean, specified brake fluid and install the reservoir cap.

Hybrid vehicles

13. NOTE: On hybrid vehicles, the brake booster push rod has an elongated slot that attaches to the brake pedal with a clevis pin. The elongated slot allows for a small amount of pedal travel (free play) to occur without the brake pedal applying pressure on the booster push rod. When performing a bleed procedure, it is important to push the pedal through the air gap, so that the clevis pin is contacting the brake booster push rod. Except when required by the scan tool, the ignition key must remain off during the bleed procedure to allow minimal force required to push through the gap.

With the ignition off, press the brake pedal through the gap to seat the clevis pin against the brake booster push rod and then confirm the pedal is firm.

- If the brake pedal is spongy (soft), repeat the Pressure Bleeding procedure to remove any remaining air from the system.

Non-hybrid vehicles

14. Apply the brakes several times to verify correct brake operation.
- If the brake pedal is spongy (soft), repeat the Pressure Bleeding procedure to remove any remaining air from the system.

Hydraulic Control Unit (HCU) Bleeding

WARNING: Do not use any fluid other than clean brake fluid meeting manufacturer's specification. Additionally, do not use brake fluid that has been previously drained. Following these instructions will help prevent system contamination, brake component damage and the risk of serious personal injury.

WARNING: Carefully read cautionary information on product label. For EMERGENCY MEDICAL INFORMATION seek medical advice. In the USA or Canada on Ford/Motorcraft products call: 1-800-959-3673. For additional information, consult the product Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) if available. Failure to follow these instructions may result in serious personal injury.

WARNING: Do not allow the brake master cylinder to run dry during the bleeding operation. Master cylinder may be damaged if operated without fluid, resulting in degraded braking performance. Failure to follow this instruction may result in serious personal injury.

NOTICE: Do not spill brake fluid on painted or plastic surfaces or damage to the surface may occur. If brake fluid is spilled onto a painted or plastic surface, immediately wash the surface with water.

NOTE: When any part of the hydraulic system is disconnected for repair or installation of new components, air can get into the system and cause spongy brake pedal action. This requires bleeding of the hydraulic system after it is correctly connected.

All vehicles

1. Use the Pressure Bleeding procedure to bleed the system. For additional information, refer to Brake System Bleeding.

2. Connect the scan tool and follow the ABS HCU Hydraulic Control Unit (HCU) bleeding instructions.

3. Repeat the Pressure Bleeding procedure to bleed the system.

Hybrid vehicles

4. Following the scan tool instructions, carry out the Multi-Calibration Routine.

___________________________

Let me know if I can help in any way.

Joe
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Friday, April 9th, 2021 AT 2:08 PM (Merged)
Tiny
LKLAFTER1
  • MEMBER
For all you out there that have issues with bleeding brakes on your Ford fusion after installation of the master cylinder. Ran into that just the other day. Replaced the master cylinder after bench bleeding with no issues. The whole job took no more than couple of hours. However, when I was ready to bleed the brakes, the pedal would go down to the floor with no resistance no matter how many times I pumped it. Barley any fluid would come out at the wheel during the bleeding process. When I was unsuccessful with traditional bleeding process, I tried everything from vacuum bleeding to gravity bleeding. No luck. When I went on line, I found some sites stating that when one works on braking system aft of ABS module, there are usually no issues bleeding brakes. However, when one works forward of ABS, such as master cylinder and fluid path has been broken, the ABS system locks up and needs to be bled since the internal switch in the ABS will not allow the fluid to flow normally to the wheels, so wheel bleeding is impossible. When one reads further, one will read about the necessity of an expensive ODB tool to reset the ABS codes to put in the bleed mode and open the flow path to the wheels. Unless you have something like this, you will have to go to the dealer or another shop that has this tool. I myself do not have this tool and since I have no brakes, I would have to tow the car to have it bled at a shop. Not my first choice. It is my understanding that the ABS requires some pressure to reactivate the bypass directly to the wheels. So ABS needs to be bled out since the pressure path has been broken during installation and air is trapped in the main lines connecting the master cylinder and the ABS. No matter how many times one pumps the pedal, all one will be doing is compressing the air in the line, never developing enough pressure to switch the ABS to pass through mode. Since I did not see any bleeding ports on the ABS module, after several hours, I decided to bleed the main lines from the MC to ABS at the ABS connection. If successful, I hoped to develop enough pressure back at the ABS module to trick the module to kick in the bypass path directly to the wheels. These are the two larger diameter brake lines going to the ABS module. I followed the same bleeding process with one person in the car pumping the pedal 4 or 5 times and holding the pedal down to the floor. At that time I released the compression fitting ( half a turn or so) at the ABS and fluid and air started to come out. I tighten the fitting and repeated the process several times until I got a good fluid flow only. I repeated the same process on the second line. I noticed the pedal started to feel different and get a bit stiffer after several bleed cycle. Once this was completed, I started to bleed my wheels as I would normally. Voila, the fluid flow to the wheels was restored and bleeding was successful. Hope this helps any of you in a similar situation.
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Friday, April 9th, 2021 AT 2:08 PM (Merged)
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
This is dandy information, but let me add a few thoughts. Both of you replaced the master cylinder so this warning doesn't apply, but it does to anyone else bleeding brakes with an old master cylinder. After about a year or so, crud and corrosion build up in the lower halves of the bores where the pistons don't normally travel. When you run the brake pedal all the way to the floor, the rubber lip seals are run over that crud, and that can rip them. That results in a slowly-sinking brake pedal, and that often takes two or three days to show up. For that reason, any time a car comes in where the driver was surprised by a sudden leak as from a ruptured rubber hose, or when we're informed the owner already tried bleeding the system, we always include a rebuilt mater cylinder in the repair estimate so we're covered in case that additional cost becomes necessary. A lot of shops automatically replace the master cylinder right away rather than risk the liability and angry customer if it fails a few days later.

The standard warning is to never push a brake pedal all the way to the floor. I never use pedal-bleeding with a helper any more, since the late '80s. Gravity-bleeding has always done the job.

The second issue when replacing a master cylinder is there is rarely a need to bleed at the wheels. The steel lines come out the side of the master cylinder for an inch or two, then bend and go down. Except for those coupe of inches, how is air going to get in the rest of the lines? All that bleeding at the wheels accomplishes is forcing air to go into the lines and the ABS hydraulic controller. That is when the real frustration starts.

There's no valves in the hydraulic controller that need power applied to open and let brake fluid flow. If that were the case, you'd have no brakes when a major electrical failure occurred, and you'd have an unusually-high and hard brake pedal since the fluid flow was blocked. You can be sure there would be lawsuits over that, and the politicians would get involved. Rather, when anything electrical happens, and when no ABS activation is required, the path for brake fluid flow is wide open like normal, and the brakes will work the same as they did on all non-ABS-equipped vehicles for the last 100 years. Gravity-bleeding would eventually expel the air in the lines, at the bleeder screws at the wheels.

The problem is there's chambers that fill with brake fluid inside the hydraulic controller. When ABS activation is called for, valves push that fluid out, then release it back, to pulse brake fluid pressure to a wheel. It's those chambers that need to have the air expelled. To do that requires opening some valves, and that can only be done two ways. One is to drive the vehicle fast enough to allow ABS activation, typically 3 to 9 mph, and the bleeder screws have to be open at the wheels to give the fluid a place to go. Obviously that is not a practical procedure since you can't run fast enough alongside the car. This is why we have to do the procedure with a scanner. That has a procedure for doing the bleeding on the hoist. Most vehicles require bleeding at just two wheels, and it takes less than ten seconds.

All of this can be avoided when replacing the master cylinder, although Ford has complicated the issue by using four steel lines at their master cylinders instead of just two. You'll still usually find only two lines when the car has ABS. Bench-bleed the replacement master cylinder like normal. Loosen the soft metal line nuts while the old master cylinder is still bolted to the power booster. Unbolt the master cylinder and slide it forward off the mounting studs. At this point, to speed up the process a little, I use the master cylinder as a handle to bend the steel lines up a little. That will prevent the brake fluid from running out of that first inch of line. This is where you can only do that on two of the four lines on Fords. Now remove the lines from the old master cylinder.

Do your bench-bleeding line normal, then install the lines onto it. Snug the line nuts just enough to prevent loss of fluid. Push the master cylinder down to bend the lines back to their normal shape, then bolt it to the power booster.

At this point there are just a few air bubbles in the lines and they're all right next to the ports in the master cylinder. Loosen one of the line nuts about a quarter turn, then have a trusted helper slowly push the brake pedal no more than half way to the floor. It should take about 15 seconds to do that. You'll see air bubbles coming out by the line nut. Tighten that nut, then holler to your helper to release the pedal quickly. Loosen the nut, then do that again, and possibly a third time, until no more air bubbles come out. Repeat that for the other line, and you're done.

By pushing the brake pedal slowly, brake fluid gets pushed down the lines, like normal, and the air has time to float back up. When the pedal is released quickly, the fluid rushing back washes any air along with it back up into the reservoir. Even if a few tiny air bubbles remain in the lines, you know they aren't going to go down to the wheels or the hydraulic controller. Air is lighter than brake fluid. It won't take long while idling at a stop light with the brakes applied and the car is vibrating, for that air to work its way out and into the reservoir.

Thank you, Lklafter1, for adding your information. Some engineers seem to be fulfilled when they make things as unnecessarily-complicated as possible. Hopefully this will help others researching this topic.
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Friday, April 9th, 2021 AT 2:08 PM (Merged)
Tiny
AP303
  • MEMBER
  • 2010 FORD FUSION
  • 2.5L
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 136,500 MILES
Was doing a simple front pad swap when the wrong bolt was taken loose from the front passenger brake and brake fluid was released from system. After getting bolt back in and pads on went to start car to check brakes and brake pedal went all the way to the floor with a soft and spongy feel pumped for a few times even drive for a few feet (hindsight should not have done any of this but lessons are meant to be learned). Later was informed to add fluid and bleed system so did that still nothing. After further research and driving it to a friend's garage I later deciphered that it could be a bad master cylinder. Found one replaced it gravity bled it then bled the brakes from furthest point from the master cylinder still nothing repeated process a few times to no further gain. So now I ask you, system components rear disc brakes and ABS.
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Friday, April 9th, 2021 AT 2:08 PM (Merged)
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
It sounds like the initial problem was caused right after the pads were replaced. Gravity-bleeding would have been sufficient after loosening the bolt for the brake hose. All that was needed was to open the bleeder screw for half a minute, and briefly loosen the cap on the brake fluid reservoir so vacuum does not build up that would impede fluid flow. The real problem comes from having to push the pistons into the calipers to make room for the new, thicker pads. Once the job is completed, you need to pump the brake pedal repeatedly until the pistons are run back out to adjust them. Most do-it-yourselfers and inexperienced mechanics push the brake pedal all the way to the floor. That is what damages the master cylinder. This can also happen when a driver is surprised by a sudden leak. For that reason, when estimating the cost of repairing a leaking line or hose, most reputable shops will automatically include the cost of a new master cylinder.

Crud and corrosion build up in the lower halves of the bores where the pistons do not normally travel. Pushing the pedal over half way runs the rubber lip seals over that crud and can rip them. That results in a slowly-sinking brake pedal, and that often does not show up for two or three days.

There is no way air could have gotten into the lines until the master cylinder was disconnected. I have a trick to replace a master cylinder without the need to bleed at the wheels, but it does not work as well on Fords that have four steel lines leaving the master cylinder. Once the new master cylinder was installed, there would be some air at the top of the lines, then, pedal-bleeding with a helper, and possibly even when gravity-bleeding, that air would become trapped in the anti-lock brake hydraulic controller. At that point you will always have a mushy brake pedal. You will need a scanner to command the ABS computer to open two valves so those chambers can be bled, then bleed at the two wheels listed on the scanner's display to expel the air.
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Friday, April 9th, 2021 AT 2:08 PM (Merged)
Tiny
KASEKENNY1
  • EXPERT
Just to add some more reference material for this issue.

Here are some guides that will help with this issue.

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/brake-pedal-goes-to-the-floor

Also, here is some info on bleeding and flushing the brake system.

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/how-to-bleed-or-flush-a-car-brake-system

Let's run through this info and report back if there are issues. Thanks
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Friday, April 9th, 2021 AT 2:08 PM (Merged)
Tiny
STEFFSTEFF
  • MEMBER
  • 2008 FORD FUSION
  • 75,000 MILES
What would cause a brake line not bleed? I have had mastercylinder replaced because it wouldn't stop unless you pump the brakes. Then I was told it was my hydraulic pump in my ABS system, so I had it replaced (2) times. The tech has been working on it for 3 weeks can you give me some insight as to what the problem could be? There are 6 lines and only one of them isn't bleeding and the tech has been checking for blockage and leaks and hasn't found any as of yet.
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Friday, April 9th, 2021 AT 2:08 PM (Merged)
Tiny
ASEMASTER6371
  • EXPERT
Here is a video and guide below to help you bleed the brake system correctly.

https://youtu.be/w7gUsj2us0U

and

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/how-to-bleed-or-flush-a-car-brake-system

and

https://youtu.be/WDxvEQrMkBg

Please run down these guides and report back.
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Friday, April 9th, 2021 AT 2:08 PM (Merged)
Tiny
STEFFSTEFF
  • MEMBER
Thank you Roy for your prompt response. Would replacing a bad hose be expensive?
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Friday, April 9th, 2021 AT 2:08 PM (Merged)
Tiny
ASEMASTER6371
  • EXPERT
No, the hose is around 20 plus 1 hour labor

Roy
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Friday, April 9th, 2021 AT 2:08 PM (Merged)
Tiny
STEFFSTEFF
  • MEMBER
Thank you once again for your help! Back to the Ford house I go to present this scenario to them. You have a fantastic day!
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Friday, April 9th, 2021 AT 2:08 PM (Merged)
Tiny
BUGSMYSTER21@SBCGLOBAL.NET
  • MEMBER
  • 2006 FORD FUSION
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
I changed my rear brakes on a 2006 ford fusion I couldn't get the brake caliper to bleed correctly can you help me please?
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Friday, April 9th, 2021 AT 2:08 PM (Merged)

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