2011 Acura TL squeaky/chirping/cricket noise

Tiny
STEVENHUANG
  • MEMBER
  • 2011 ACURA TL
  • 3.7L
  • 6 CYL
  • AWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 46,000 MILES
The car start to have this chirping noise after I changed differential oil for AWD in a car shop (don't know if this D oil change can be related to the noise or not), the squeaky/chirping/cricket noise sounds very similar to timing belt chirping sound, but for sure it's not the belt or water pump
the noise will start / is like:
1. Only will start after about 10-15 mins drive (when the car warm up enough), no noise when car is in parking or just start driving around of the day
2. Only will start make noise when speed is over 30-35 m/h, then disappear when the car is below 10-15 m/h
3. The noise is proportional to how fast the car is (I think proportional to how fast the wheel runs), it's not proportional to tachometer, neither how much gas deliver, that's also why I believe it's not the timing belt or exhaust leak. And the car shop also believe it's not bearing wheel cause they know how a bearing wheel sounds like, not in my case.
4. The noise will be more concentrate when speed is fast, just like something on a tire make some routine noise, when car runs very fast the noise will be more coherence
5. Noise is not huge, but you can hear it clearly, specially when you drive fast then slow down, the frequent of the noise will reduce according to the speed and the noise will be very noticeable

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Saturday, January 24th, 2015 AT 5:16 PM

7 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
The first thing that comes to mind is a wear indicator on a front brake pad. You're at the mileage when it's time for a brake system inspection.

If the noise is not related to the brakes, there is a tool you might be able to borrow or rent from an auto parts store that borrows them called the "Chassis Ear". It is a set of six microphones, a switch box, and headphones. You clip the microphones to suspect points, then drive around while listening with the headphones. You can move the microphones around to zero in on the source of the noise. Be aware that many mechanics have never seen or even heard of this tool. Suspension and alignment mechanics use it to find rattles, squeaks, and other noises.
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Saturday, January 24th, 2015 AT 5:38 PM
Tiny
STEVENHUANG
  • MEMBER
Hi thank you for the help,
Just wondering the break pad or anything related to break system can make noise when the car is running? Because I don't know too much about the car, in my mind I always think break system will only make noise when you apply break?
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Saturday, January 24th, 2015 AT 8:06 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Wear indicators most commonly make a high-pitched squealing noise when the brakes are not applied. There is a little play that lets the pads turn just a little. They straighten out when the brakes are applied, and that can move the "squeaker" away from the rotor, and the noise stops. This noise is similar to the "fingernails-on- the-blackboard" screeching. It's easiest to hear when it echoes off the side of a building.

Depending on the design of the brake pads, some wear indicators will squeal more when the brakes ARE applied. What's worse is if you hear a rough grinding noise that gets worse when the brakes are applied. That means one of the linings is completely ground down to the metal backing plate. Most likely the rotor will be worn and / or ground down below the published legal minimum thickness and will have to be replaced along with the pads.
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Saturday, January 24th, 2015 AT 8:21 PM
Tiny
STEVENHUANG
  • MEMBER
Even my break pads are thick enough, the wear indicator is still possible to make noise right?
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Sunday, January 25th, 2015 AT 2:58 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Yup, the wear sensors are still a good suspect. I've seen some get bent, either from debris hitting them, or rough handling when the pads were installed. Also, those squeakers are supposed to hit the rotors long before the linings get down to the metal backing plates. Most new linings are almost 1/2" thick, so one that's half worn out will still look okay.

Also be aware that often the edge of a lining will ride up beyond the outer circumference of the rotor, so as it wears down, the outer edge that you see during a quick inspection looks like new. That has fooled a lot of professionals.
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Monday, January 26th, 2015 AT 10:15 AM
Tiny
STEVENHUANG
  • MEMBER
I went to the shop today, and they checked for me, everything looks fine, tires, breaks are fine. And they also can't find where does this noise come from, but they describe it's a Whistling Noise, and it sound like a whist. And I found this on your website, my car is only making noise when it's moving, so I was wondering if the window seals is the only problem, is there any other possibilities?
http://www.2carpros.com/articles/car-whistling-noise
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Thursday, January 29th, 2015 AT 6:09 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Try pushing on the upper part of the door while you're driving. You should hear if the noise gets worse.
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Thursday, January 29th, 2015 AT 6:23 PM

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