2000 Chevrolet Silverado ABS

Tiny
ROY HODKIEWICZ
  • MEMBER
  • 2000 CHEVROLET SILVERADO
  • 4.3L
  • V8
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 148,000 MILES
The anti-lock brakes engage when the vehicle is going very slow (walking speed), as when coming to a stop. Wheels are turning (without lock-up), and there is no reason for the anti-lock mechanism to engage. This is more than just annoying because while the brakes are rapidly pulsating, the vehicle is not stopping. For example, while creeping along and turning into a parking spot, the anti-lock brake mechanism began pulsation of the brakes, preventing the depression/actuation of the brake pedal, which disallowed the vehicle to slow down. I barely missed scraping the car parked in the adjacent spot, because I expected the vehicle to slow down and stop. I removed the fuse for the anti-lock brake system, and that prevented the problem from reoccurring (hydraulics work good), but the cruse control stopped working. I do not care about not having anti-lock brakes, but I do value, and want the cruse control. What is your recommendation on dealing with this. No ABS error codes in computer.
Do you
have the same problem?
Yes
No
Tuesday, August 19th, 2014 AT 2:01 PM

2 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
The wheel speed sensors on GM trucks generate rather wimpy signals to start with, and anything that reduces that even more will make it look to the computer like that wheel stopped turning. In response the ABS kicks in to try to get that wheel turning again. On most truck brands the ABS stops activating below 3 - 7 mph, but even when they still do, most don't reduce stopping distances like on GM vehicles. The purpose of anti-lock brakes is actually only to maintain steering control, not shorten stopping distances, but most vehicles DO stop quicker when the ABS kicks in.

I assume you have four-wheel anti-lock brakes, not rear-wheel, and it's a 1500. GM has had a common problem where rust builds up between the hub and wheel speed sensor. That pushes the sensor away from the tone ring which weakens the already weak signal. Many people think they solve the problem by replacing the speed sensor, which will work, but the better fix is to remove the two front sensors and clean the rust off the mounting surfaces on the hubs, and to clean off any rust or metal filing on the end of the sensor.

If there was an electrical problem with a sensor, typically a broken wire, that would be detected by the computer which would set a diagnostic fault code, turn the system off, and turn the yellow warning light on to tell you. That hasn't happened so we can assume electrically the sensors are okay. They just aren't generating a solid signal. Anything that generates a voltage generates a smaller voltage as the speed decreases. That's why you get the false activation only at lower speeds. As the problem gets worse, the false activation will occur at higher and higher speeds.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
+1
Tuesday, August 19th, 2014 AT 9:28 PM
Tiny
ROY HODKIEWICZ
  • MEMBER
Thank you very much!
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Wednesday, August 20th, 2014 AT 8:29 AM

Please login or register to post a reply.

Recommended Guides