1997 Toyota Tercel wheel bearing

Tiny
AWS
  • MEMBER
  • 1997 TOYOTA TERCEL
  • 1.5L
  • 4 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 211,500 MILES
My car is make a metal grinding noise. I thought it was the rotor but no. Besides I had Front passenger side up and to me I basically just turn rotor and same thing. How to change Front wheel bearing?

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Friday, December 13th, 2013 AT 5:21 PM

7 Replies

Tiny
OBXAUTOMEDIC
  • EXPERT
Hello,

You may not have the right tools to replace the hub bearing. However, you can remove the entire steering knuckle and take to a shop and ask them to press it out and press the new one in. Pics attached for instructions.
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Saturday, December 14th, 2013 AT 5:41 PM
Tiny
OBXAUTOMEDIC
  • EXPERT
Oh, the one with all the numbers is the Torque in Foot Pounds for the nuts and bolts
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Saturday, December 14th, 2013 AT 5:43 PM
Tiny
2CARPROS MIKE
  • ADMIN
From Hmac300 Expert

Raise and support vehicle. Remove front wheels. Remove cotter pin, bearing lock nut cap, and bearing lock nut (apply brakes when removing lock nut). Remove brake caliper, leaving brake line connected. Secure caliper aside.
Remove disc brake rotor. Remove cotter pin and castle nut from tie rod end. Using Puller (09628-62011), separate tie rod end from steering knuckle.
Remove nuts and bolt attaching lower ball joint to lower control arm. See Fig. 3 or Fig. 4. Loosen, but DO NOT remove, shock absorber lower mounting bolts. On Paseo, disconnect steering knuckle from axle shaft with Puller (09950-20017).
On Corolla, RAV4 and Tercel, tap end of axle shaft with plastic mallet to remove axle from hub. On all models, remove shock absorber lower mounting bolts. Remove steering knuckle and axle hub as an assembly.
Mount steering knuckle in a vise. Using Puller (09628-62011), remove lower ball joint from steering knuckle (if necessary). On Corolla, remove dust deflector. On all models, remove inner oil seal and snap ring from steering knuckle.
Remove bolts holding dust cover to steering knuckle. Using Puller (09950-20017), remove axle hub. Remove dust cover. Remove hub bearing inner race. Using Puller (09950-20017), remove hub bearing outer race from axle hub. Remove outer oil seal from steering knuckle.
Reinstall outer race onto hub bearing. Using a brass drift and hammer, remove hub bearing from steering knuckle
yours is similar to pic.
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Monday, December 16th, 2013 AT 2:59 PM
Tiny
RICHARD NIBBLER
  • MEMBER
Jeezus! It's not that hard. Either remove the whole wheel assembly or find a simple way to get to your bearings.

OP, You make it sound like rocket f-ing science! I have replaced the bearings on many vehicles without a hitch.

Although the above description may be helpful in some fashion, take a look at your front hub. Remove it, if it is easily removed. If not, only remove the "bad" bearing, then, clean everything from where it sat. Put the new bearing in it's place, and tighten the wheel nut. The bearing will fall into place when the wheel nut is tightened, unless you had it all kidimapass to begin with. Think about how bearings work. They spin with your axle, or with your tire. If they wear out, you just replace them. Nothing worth over stressing. Like I said, not rocket f-ing science!
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Saturday, April 22nd, 2017 AT 4:28 PM
Tiny
RICHARD NIBBLER
  • MEMBER
Using Puller Using Puller (09628-62011)
Who the fuck are you, telling anyone that you use puller #72418, and it is better than someone else's. Use my puller (69696969-1) to pull your teeth. Think about it. If it was your car, what would you really do. I get the whole mechanic "this is my life and I will keep you on task with your car" thing, but, sometimes you just really need to go where you need to go. Either you are completely out of touch, or you are a crooked piece of shit. "This is what my job tells me." Yeah, I get it. Fix your own bearing or pay way too much. Learn.
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Saturday, April 22nd, 2017 AT 5:21 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
My my, do you eat with that mouth? You obviously never replaced a pressed-in wheel bearing. This type was standard equipment on Toyotas, Fords, Hondas, and older Chrysler products.

I was the suspension and alignment specialist at a very nice family-owned Chrysler dealership. I replaced a lot of pressed-in bearings as well as plenty of bolt-on bearings on trade-ins and crash-repaired vehicles. Those are typically found on GM products and newer Chryslers. I can verify you aren't good enough to simply unbolt a pressed-in bearing and slap in a new one. I developed a faster way to do it that suited my work style, but it still involved using the special tool. On a good day, with plenty of experience, and the right tools at hand, I could replace a pressed-in Chrysler bearing in less than a half hour, with no need to align the vehicle. If you think you're better than that, try it and prove it to yourself. Don't overlook that some are held in with a wire ring that isn't always apparent. On all of them you'll want to replace the grease seal if you have your customer's best interest at heart. That requires another special cone to pound it in evenly and without distorting it.

Your comment about the bearing "falling into place" by tightening the axle nut is pure nonsense, and proves you don't know what you're talking about. The axle nut / outer CV joint holds the bearing together. Nothing about it pulls the bearing into the spindle, even with the easily-replaced bolt-on type of bearing. If you remove the three of four mounting bolts, those are what holds the bearing to the spindle, not the axle nut. With those mounting bolts removed, you can slide the bearing out and bring the half shaft with it. Some outer CV joints are even small enough that you can completely remove the shaft from the vehicle, as though there is any value in doing so.

The fact you felt the need to add to this three-year-old post suggests you were searching through multiple posts to find an answer to a problem you were having, as many people do. If you see a mistake, you can post a reply to add a correction, but we do that without the attitude, especially when you don't know all the specifics or what you're taking about. You're welcome to add helpful hints and information of value, but don't come in here with both guns blazing and try to tell the experts that you're smarter than them. There's always multiple ways to say something, and you managed to find the lowest, most disrespectful way to state your case. You couldn't even be bothered to describe a different or better way to do the job. All you said is "you're stupid; I'm smart" then you ran off to hide.

If you post another reply with the same disrespectful language, you can expect the site owners to delete it. We make a real lot of new friends here every day, and that often starts out with having to explain some really basic stuff. Not all of our visitors are as smart as you, yet we help them get the problem solved without making them feel stupid. Sit back and watch for a few weeks and see how it's done.
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Saturday, April 22nd, 2017 AT 8:27 PM
Tiny
OBXAUTOMEDIC
  • EXPERT
Well Said CARADIODOC
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Sunday, April 23rd, 2017 AT 8:53 AM

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