Transmission pan bolts torque

Tiny
DIGGSIES
  • MEMBER
  • 2007 FORD FREESTAR
  • 3.9L
  • 50,000 MILES
I really need the torque for the car listed above transmission pan bolts pretty please. I have to change the filter really really soon and I can't find the torque anywhere. Can you help me please? Thank you so much for taking the time to read this.
Diggs
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Saturday, January 18th, 2020 AT 6:40 PM

28 Replies

Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
See the attached pic. Let me know if this helps.

Joe
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Saturday, January 18th, 2020 AT 9:51 PM
Tiny
DIGGSIES
  • MEMBER
I really hope this helps. I can't tell if that is for the transmission pan but it looks like it could be. I'll put them on at 9. Thank you so much! I couldn't find it anywhere.
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Sunday, January 19th, 2020 AT 7:13 AM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Hi,

I found that on Alldata. It's an excellent manual and I went under transmission torque specs. With that, it should be correct.

Please feel free to let me know if I can help. Also, I realize 9 ft/lbs seems loose, but you are placing a steel bolt into an aluminum housing. They strip easily, so be careful. Plus, you don't want the gasket to squeeze out from it's positioning.

Take care and let me know if you need anything.

Joe
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Sunday, January 19th, 2020 AT 1:27 PM
Tiny
DIGGSIES
  • MEMBER
Oh man thank you so much for your help. I got the fluid and filter changed today along with the engine oil and all filters that AutoZone and I could find. I put the little bolts on at 9 lbs and no leaks after an hour of driving. I know I would have muscled it down way too tight without your help. And your answer was so fast. Thank you so much again.
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Sunday, January 19th, 2020 AT 7:14 PM
Tiny
DIGGSIES
  • MEMBER
Can I ask a related question here or do I open a new ticket? Here goes. My apologies if this is not proper.

So I did the transmission filter and fluid change because the van started slipping and making clacking/knocking sounds recently, when accelerating normally. (Sounds kinda like engine miss from inside the van) I remembered old rwd vehicles having a metal screen filter back in the day but couldn't find info on one on this van. I recalled that the screen would get dirty and you had to baby the throttle to keep from slipping. After the filter change today I still have the same problem. Still have to drive it like the oldest mawmaw going to church. Did I miss the metal screen? Is there something I can check. I can't afford the transmission shop. The fluid was dirty but not black. The filter was pretty nasty. No chunks in the pan. Just a little powder on the magnet. No coolant in the fluid. Just turned 50,000 on the odometer. I really hope you can help. And thanks again for your help earlier.
Diggs
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Sunday, January 19th, 2020 AT 7:24 PM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Normally, when we change topics, we request a new post, but this is still related.

First, you are very welcome. I'm glad I was able to help. As far as a screen, there isn't anything like that used on this vehicle. Now, the idea that it is slipping at such a low mileage is really odd. Is the noise you hear loud enough to record and upload for me to hear? Also, has the check engine light come on at any point?

As far as the noise, if there are no codes, the first thing I would do is what you already have done. I would have done a few general inspections such as axles joints, made sure there was nothing with the torque converter or anything loose. If everything appeared good, I would then check transmission line pressure to confirm there isn't something happening to lower pressure, which can cause issues.

Tell me, are you certain the sound is from the transmission? The idea that it feels like a misfire makes me question other things. Just for the heck of it, take a rubber mallet and tap on the exhaust to see if the insides of the catalytic converter is loose and rattles. Something could be blocking exhaust flow, which will create interesting results, such as misfire, power loss and so on.

If you look at the pic below, it shows step 1 of checking for a soft shift or slipping. Note that it indicates it be scanned. There are a number of things that can cause it, but it becomes a guessing game if there are no diagnostic trouble codes. That is why I would check line pressure first.

When you say the transmission slips, do the RPM raise but there is no pull from the engine? Also, does it slip in all gears or is it one specific shift. For example, first to second slips.

Let me know.
Joe
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Sunday, January 19th, 2020 AT 8:31 PM
Tiny
DIGGSIES
  • MEMBER
It's happening going into second, third and fourth and will even do it at 65 mph, the rapid clacking sound, like if you were going to pass someone or going up a bridge, and only when accelerating normally or punching it. The other day is when I realized it wasn't engine miss. Leaving the house a big truck came up fast behind me and I gave the van some juice and shifting from first to second it slipped completely, rev but no go. It was like I was in neutral. I'm not a transmission guy but everything looked real nice when I was in there. No codes at all. No lights. The van codes for misfire easily, did the plugs and wires already.
The idea of it being axle related is not something id considered. I just figured transmission. But certainly it could make the noise even in the middle of a gear and if something is funky there I suppose it would fail to deliver power to the wheels but it seems like it would fail altogether to me, but I'm a life long shade tree parts changer and only out of necessity, not a mechanic.
I'll look up the line pressure test tomorrow morning and see about that right away. The wife is worried about it and I just dropped a penny on it so you can tell I'm worried too.
I'll also see about getting a sound file for you. It should be loud enough for that. I'm not seeing any picture but I'll bet I can pull one off the net now that I got the baby back to sleep. Thank you for trying to help with this. It's very important to me and my family.
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Monday, January 20th, 2020 AT 1:32 AM
Tiny
STEVE W.
  • EXPERT
Rapid clacking sound and slipping sounds like a failed intermediate clutch. Common failure in the 4F50N trans-axle. The clacking is from the clutch engaging enough that it takes up any slop in the gearing, then it hits the torque limit the bad clutch can handle and it slips and the gear train releases. They also have an issue with the torque converters failing and making a lot of noise. That usually sounds like a couple of steel pans banging together, the clue if that is the case would be that the noise stops with the transmission in OD and the converter clutch engaged so the internals are not moving relative to each other.
Not something that can be repaired in the vehicle though.
50,000 is an early failure unless it was run hard, but that trans-axle isn't know for reliability.
FYI if you replace or rebuild it, fluid and filter every 25,000 to 30,000 can help them live longer.
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Monday, January 20th, 2020 AT 6:56 AM
Tiny
DIGGSIES
  • MEMBER
Oh dear. Bad news Mr Steve. :-(
I guess I'll start getting some prices together while I baby it. Thank you for all of your help.
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Monday, January 20th, 2020 AT 9:29 AM
Tiny
STEVE W.
  • EXPERT
Yeah, sorry about that. Ford was investigated about the lack of reliability in the entire line up of these units starting in the mid 1980's and up. Ford changed internal parts all the time but even the new parts were failing as fast as the old ones, or they would fix one issue, another would appear. If you have a good transmission builder in your area you might talk to them and see what updates can be done. The guy I use curses at me when I show up with one, so be prepared!
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Monday, January 20th, 2020 AT 9:48 AM
Tiny
DIGGSIES
  • MEMBER
Yes sir. A last bit if you will. I can get a re-manufactured transmission with 3 year warranty for 1500 with fluid etc, after core, and swap it myself? I didn't check yet but that seems cheaper than having it rebuilt. Do you feel that would be a good way to go? And do you know what's the best book to get for this project? So I can see if I need specialty tools or if I need to pull the whole motor etc. It's our only vehicle so I'd need to get it all done in a day, 2 tops, with having the baby around. I've pulled transmissions on rwd vehicles in the past just never a fwd. I know it's not the same. I'm looking into everything right now. Thank you.
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Monday, January 20th, 2020 AT 10:18 AM
Tiny
STEVE W.
  • EXPERT
That's a good price for a drop in. About what my guy gets for a re-build.

The transmission comes out the bottom. The hardest part is usually getting the car up high enough to get it out. You use an engine support to hold the engine up, then drop the cradle out from under it and then remove the trans-axle. Book time is about 8 hours to do the job.

For the same info the shops and we use you can get Alldata DIY or Mitchell for $30.00 a year. Both will show the removal and install as well as a lot of other information.

http://www.alldatadiy.com/
https://www.eautorepair.net/Marketing/Default.asp

Tool wise the pictures are the special tools. Out of all of the listed pieces the only one that is really handy is the tie rode tool.
The engine support is a couple legs and a brace that set over the engine and bolt to it on the exhaust manifolds. I've used a regular engine lift, or make a simple crossbeam out of a 4X4 cut so it goes across the engine bay and on the strut towers and core support. Then a chain to a couple handy spots on the engine.

The slide hammer can be replaced with a couple short pry bars, it's used to pop the half-shafts free from the transmission.
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Monday, January 20th, 2020 AT 11:48 AM
Tiny
DIGGSIES
  • MEMBER
Okay great! I've seen a nice YouTube video of the guy dropping it out of the bottom in his yard. I'll subscribe to one of your suggestions in the morning. I can't thank you enough for your help and advice on everything including the subscription and tool info. I'm on half salary atm with a torn acl so I don't have much spare change. Me and a buddy should be able to do this repair quickly. Thank you so much.
Diggs
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Monday, January 20th, 2020 AT 4:27 PM
Tiny
DIGGSIES
  • MEMBER
Oh shucks I almost forgot! Will either of those subscriptions tell me about other parts, seals, gaskets, boots, proper filling procedures, etc. That I will need upon installation of the new transmission? I won't be mobile until the van is fixed so I'd like to have those goodies on hand so I don't end up stuck and begging a ride out in the country. Thanks. Sorry I'm taking up so much of your time.
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Monday, January 20th, 2020 AT 4:36 PM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Based on your description, it sounds like a pressure related issue. Here are directions for testing transmission line pressure. It also indicates possible causes based on results.

______________________________________

2007 Ford Truck Freestar V6-3.9L VIN 6
4F50N (AX4N) Automatic Transaxle
Vehicle Transmission and Drivetrain Automatic Transmission/Transaxle Testing and Inspection Component Tests and General Diagnostics Line Pressure Test 4F50N (AX4N) Automatic Transaxle
4F50N (AX4N) AUTOMATIC TRANSAXLE
Line Pressure Test

Line Pressure Test

Pic 1

CAUTION: Carry out the Line Pressure Test prior to carrying out the Stall Speed Test. If the line pressure is low at stall, do not carry out the Stall Speed Test or further transaxle damage will occur. Do not maintain wide open throttle in any transaxle range for more than 5 seconds.

This test verifies that the line pressure is within specification.
1. Connect a pressure gauge to the line pressure tap.
2. Start the engine and check the line pressures. Refer to the line pressure chart to determine if the line pressure is within specification.

Line Pressure Chart (Part 1)
pic 2

Line Pressure Chart (Part 2)
pic 3

3. If the line pressure is not within specification, check EPC pressure.
4. Connect a pressure gauge to the EPC pressure tap.
5. Start the engine and check the EPC pressure. Refer to the line pressure chart for specifications.
6. If the EPC pressure is not within specification, GO to Pinpoint Test E to diagnose the EPC operation. If EPC operation is OK, refer to the line pressure diagnosis chart for line pressure concern causes. See: Automatic Transmission/Transaxle > Pinpoint Tests > Test E: Electronic Pressure Control (EPC) Solenoid

Line Pressure Diagnosis Chart

Line Pressure Diagnosis Chart

_________________________________

Let me know what you find. I hope it's a simple fix. I have to be honest, these transmission usually don't fail like this.

Take care,
Joe
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Monday, January 20th, 2020 AT 7:29 PM
Tiny
DIGGSIES
  • MEMBER
Oh wow, I just realized there have been 2 different people responding. Even better to have two experts helping! It definitely wouldn't hurt to test before having to replace the whole shebang. Can you link to an appropriate gauge and guide showing where these line and EPC pressure taps are located please? Then I can buy the tool and check this out straight away. I'll look up some videos to see if I can get an idea in the meantime. Thank you too Mr Joe.
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Monday, January 20th, 2020 AT 8:37 PM
Tiny
STEVE W.
  • EXPERT
You should be able to get a pressure test gauge at a parts store as a loaner tool instead of buying something as a one time purchase. Both the line pressure and the electronic pressure port are on top of the transmission. To the left of the electrical connector.
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Tuesday, January 21st, 2020 AT 12:19 AM
Tiny
DIGGSIES
  • MEMBER
Roger D. I'm on it!
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Tuesday, January 21st, 2020 AT 12:51 AM
Tiny
KEN
  • ADMIN
STEVE W. Is one of our best! Use 2CarPros anytime, we are here to help. Please tell a friend.
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Thursday, January 23rd, 2020 AT 10:56 AM
Tiny
DIGGSIES
  • MEMBER
Finally got the gauge set. Had to order one off the net. No stores had one available for purchase, rent or loan. Did line test and found very low pressure in 3rd gear at idle. Did not preform stall test as everything I saw said not to if test at idle was not in range. 3 came in at 79. Your chart says it should be at 102 - 138.

Line pressures were as follows:

P 72 1/2
R 92
N 76
D 79
3 79
1 110

I see your troubleshooting table says possible causes low at idle all gears etc but I'm not sure how to pinpoint further or if you can chime in on it knowing infinitely more than I do and having a working brain unlike the chart. At this point it hasn't fully slipped a gear (no movement of vehicle under throttle) since I started to baby it, but it will go to clacking a bunch if I accelerate too quickly. As in, anything more than the oldest granny on her way to the oldest church down the oldest dirt road.
I need to know if it will be necessary and more cost effective to just replace this trans-axle with a re-manufactured one which has a 3 year warranty or else to fix this machine. I can swap parts easily enough, especially with the information you all gave me about the subscription services. I can drop and install the new trans-axle easily enough for what it is if need be too. It will just take me about a month to get the funds together since I'm on stupid work comp with these knee surgeries.
Do you recommend doing the epc test as well or not and if not do you recommend the re-manufactured transmission or else swapping other parts and bits or else some other tests to confirm or deny a failing piece, part or bit?
I will do whatever needs to be done.
Thank you both for all of your help and thank you too admin for checking up and weighing in.
Diggs
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Saturday, February 1st, 2020 AT 12:32 PM

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