Ease of replacing.

Tiny
BOMBSHELBOY
  • MEMBER
  • TOYOTA
Hey everyone. I am an analytical mind with good comprehension of how an engine works and general physics stuff. I was hoping to get a short bit of info based on the ease of how to replace stuff in my engine. I need the following done:

Replace clutch master cylinder
Replace clutch plate
Install a double plate clutch rather than my current 1 plate
Make my speedometer work (known to be the cable)
Replace engine
Rebuild an engine
Repair suspension

Just asking if someone will give me a 1-10 scale for each of those. Oh. Its for a Corrolla 84 SR5 Hatchback Manual.

Also. What tools I might need would be bad ass. Especially for boring out the whole engine.I was gonna do that while I rebuilt it
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Sunday, July 1st, 2007 AT 7:06 PM

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Tiny
MMPRINCE3000
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Clutch master cylinder. I would give it a 2, it is straight foward, but you must bleed the system back to the slave cylinder.

Clutch Plate. About a 6. You must remove the engine/transaxle or support the engine and remove the trans. (Among other things)

Dual disc clutch. Same as above.

Spedometer cable. Usually a 1. There is usually an intermediate cable that breaks. Unscrew old one, screw in new one.

Replace engine. Usually an 8. You need a cherry picker, jack stands and it's best to have air tools (impact wrench etc.)

Rebuild engine. Here comes a number 10. Not only remove the engine but you will need speciality tools, (bottle brush hone, calipers, plastigauge etc.)

Repair suspension. About a 5. Problem here may be finding parts. Any suspension bolts replaced must be replaced with an equal grade, e.G. Replace a 10.9 bolt with a 10.9 bolt. Also some have crush nuts that are not sold at the local hardware.

You would need a factory manual. Just remember these were written for techs that are assumed to have a certain skill level.
Also while some repairs may seem easy, you can run into problems with even simple procedures (rusted bolts, threads that strip requiring helicoil/timesert repair)
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Tuesday, July 3rd, 2007 AT 7:07 AM
Tiny
BOMBSHELBOY
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So. First off thank you very much for your speedy reply and good descriptions!

I still have a few questions though.
When you say factory manual do you mean like a Chilton or do you mean like from a Toyota factory. And if it is from a factory, how might I get ahold of one?
As for rust/striped bolts, would WD40 or a high quality lubricant be ideal for this? I used to use WD40 on gears and mechanical parts of bikes and it worked very well.
What are the specialty parts that are used in rebuilding and are there any tools that could be used as stand-ins for these? Maybe a little knowledge on what the tools are used for might beable to show if other tools could be used.
Is it possible to remove an engine with like a torque wrench instead of air tools? I say this because I don't wanna spend 3 or 4 hundred more dollars on a good set.

Thanks in advanced!
-Ari D
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Tuesday, July 3rd, 2007 AT 3:58 PM
Tiny
MMPRINCE3000
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Yes, the factory manual from Toyota. Haynes is a good manual, althouth it is not as comprehensive as the factory manual. I am not a fan of Chiltons, but it is better than nothing. Depending on the age of the car, check the owners manual for availability. Ebay is also a good resource.
WD-40 is not a good penetrant, it is a Water Displacer
it is fine to protect metal. PB Blaster is far superior to remove rusted bolts.
Calipers, Ridge reamer, hone, piston ring installer, plastigauge, torque wrench are all tools you will need to rebuild an engine. Additionally, all cars have "speciality" tools used to remove cam shims for example, or to install a variety of seals and bearings.
While you can substitute some of these, some you cannot. A Haynes manual will give you options, while the facory manual will mention a ton of speciality tools.
While you do not "need" air, it will make the job much easier, by a long shot. A car that is 23 years old will have rust problems, if not on the body on the suspension. You can count on breaking/stripping a few bolts. Soaking rusted bolts in PB Blaster will minimize this.
My advice would be to purchase a Haynes manual and read it through to get an idea of what you are getting into :D
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Wednesday, July 4th, 2007 AT 4:57 AM

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