1985 Toyota 4Runner Vibration in my pedals at about 40-60 m

Tiny
VANHCA40
  • MEMBER
  • 1985 TOYOTA 4RUNNER
  • 4 CYL
  • 4WD
  • MANUAL
  • 292,000 MILES
I get a vibration in my pedals at about 40-60 mph. It gives a dull vibration to the rest of my car. I thought it was my transmission (and I guess it still could be) but when I put my truck in neutal and coast at 40-60 mph, the vibration continues. So I thought that would eliminate the posibility of it being my transmission. What could it be? I just had my rear brakes replaced a few months ago, could it be the new drums? Could it be my U-joints? Could it be my ring and pinon? Appreciate the help.

Thanks,

Craig
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Tuesday, December 1st, 2009 AT 8:52 AM

7 Replies

Tiny
M_H_RITZEL
  • EXPERT
I would start with the wheels, have them balanced. If that does not help then check the front wheel compondents, such as bearings. Most vibrations that start at around 40mph up have to do with balancing or the wheel itself. This does not mean there could be other things but it is a good place to start
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Tuesday, December 1st, 2009 AT 10:33 AM
Tiny
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I definitely will start with the wheels and get them balanced. I hope it is that but I have had my wheels out of balance before and it feels much different. If the front bearings were causing it, wouldn't I feel the vibration in the steering wheel? I don't really feel it in the steering wheel.

Thanks,

Craig
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Tuesday, December 1st, 2009 AT 11:32 AM
Tiny
M_H_RITZEL
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Check the rims themselves to make sure they are not bent. With the car up on jacks try to wiggle the front wheels up and down then back and forth. If there is play then look into the bearings and other steering compondents.
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Friday, December 4th, 2009 AT 10:52 AM
Tiny
VANHCA40
  • MEMBER
So I got my wheels balanced and it was not that. I asked the mechanic to inspect it and he found that the drive coming out of the transmission has some play in it. I am 95% confident that is where my vibration is coming from.

The mechanic could grab the drive shaft (close to the tranny) and wiggle it around. It was not horrible but noticable.

The mechanic mentioned that I might be able to take the rear part of the tranny off (because there were some bolts there) and just replace a bearing and seal or what ever else needs to). He recommended I go to a tranny shop.

-Is this possible to replace just the tail end of the tranny?

-Will it do horrible damage to the tranny if I keep driving it?

-How much might this cost? Parts? Labor?

-Could a novice mechanic such as myself do this job?

Thanks for the help.

Craig
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Wednesday, January 6th, 2010 AT 6:08 PM
Tiny
M_H_RITZEL
  • EXPERT
The tail of the transmission can be replaced, But you might just need to replace the bearing. It is a bit complicated for a novice to do. If you keep driving it the bearing can make the tail section so it could make the bearing loose inside. If the bearing itself is bad then you could replace it with a new one. As I said it is not easy for a novice to do, but can be done
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Thursday, January 21st, 2010 AT 2:12 PM
Tiny
VANHCA40
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I actually goofed and now realize it is the transfer case. I am sure you knew what I was talking about. Yeah, I looked at a diagram in my owners manual and it looks like I could definitely get to that bearing. But I think you are right when you say you don't know how hard it would be to pull it off. Do you think it is press-fit? Are most main mechanical bearings on drive-lines press-fit?

Thanks for the help,

Craig
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Friday, January 22nd, 2010 AT 10:45 PM
Tiny
M_H_RITZEL
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The transfer case bearing is not pressed in but the bearing race is. You need a puller to take it out and should be replaced with the bearing as a set.
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Thursday, January 28th, 2010 AT 12:34 PM

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