1995 Plymouth Voyager no spark

Tiny
TRIVIAMAN
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  • 1995 PLYMOUTH VOYAGER
Electrical problem
1995 Plymouth Voyager 6 cyl Front Wheel Drive Automatic

There's no spark to the plugs.I've tried ignition control module and coil pack. What else could be the problem?
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Friday, October 16th, 2009 AT 4:24 PM

9 Replies

Tiny
CH112063
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You say no spark out of coil when you pull plug wire, crank, and hold near ground?
Well is it 3.3, 3.8L. Or 3.0. If 3.3 or 3.8L the relay juices the coil, and the fuel pump. Is there a main engine power fuse out in the power distribution center under the hood? NOT JUST A BIG FUSE, ANY SMALL, MINI, or fuse link out? That powers up the PCM which is the ignition control module. Use a 12volt test light, clamp its wire to ground, and probe for power on each side of the fuses and fuse links. If no fuse links then all fuses. OK
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Saturday, October 17th, 2009 AT 3:07 PM
Tiny
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I know the fuses are good, but will try your suggestion. Thanks for the response.
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Monday, October 19th, 2009 AT 4:51 PM
Tiny
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Glad to help. The good thing about the voltage probe is its fast and accurate testing of the power to the computer for all of the computers. Even fuse link wires can be checked quickly on both sides. I hope you get it started.
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Monday, October 19th, 2009 AT 7:47 PM
Tiny
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Hope this is the last question. Checked the fuses, and fuse links with light tester, everything appears to be working. Battery is good, fuses are good, changed control module and coil pack. What else could be the problem? Is there a way to bench test module and pack to be sure?

Thanks again
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Friday, October 23rd, 2009 AT 12:59 PM
Tiny
CH112063
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You have told me that there is no spark. And no fuel, or you smell gas?
Wonderful, I'm happy. You, ve replaced the black computer called a PCM.
And coil pack with all three coils, so take a scan reading. Get in, turn key on, off, on, off, on and look at the check engine lamp. It'll blink if the PCM is OK.
Write these blinking codes down. The last code is 5 blinks and 5 blinks. Code 55, the end of self diagnostics. You may have a code 12 first, after this let me know.
You have a 3.3 or 3.8. Or 3.0L? You have a 12 volt test light? You have all good fuses? Battery is good? Crank it over and read the codes, after cranking with all things hooked up. You smell gas? You hear relays and fuel pump after turning key on?
The key test should be done all within 5 seconds and you can do it over and over so take your time, and tell me what codes, if any. No to bench test of module. Both are tested in vehicle. A test is available, since you have done the things I asked, we are starting.
There is a crank sensor and cam sensor. A shutdown relay, a fuel pump relay, and a timing belt we must check, so we'll start with codes. OK Need info on size of engine and gas smell.
Its fuel, spark, and engine. So answer the questions, the more I know, the better and faster it goes. There may be more questions, but with a new voltage tester(thank-you) and answers, I'll see you as far as we can, ok. I'll check back at 8:00
Or tomorrow so don't rush. As lomg as the parts are good and they have power at their wiring, not much left. So test for power to the comp. And coil pack wires, if you can after you give me the codes and engine and gas check. No belt with 3.3, 3.8. Just crank and cam and PCM, coils and wires to plugs. I'm glad to help T man.
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Friday, October 23rd, 2009 AT 5:35 PM
Tiny
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I feel the need to apologize for wasting your time. After reading back our posts several times I realized that we had a miscommunication going. When I was talking about the ignition control module and you were talking about the PCM I thought we were talking about the same thing. There is a powertrain control module on my vehicle and that is what I realized you meant by PCM. I now believe that that is the part that is out.

Thanks for all your help and I'm sorry for the time wasted.
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Saturday, November 7th, 2009 AT 4:42 PM
Tiny
CH112063
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The powertrain control module is the coil driver, but it must first be turned on by the key(fused, in power center, under hood fuse box, not inside interior fuse box) if PCM gets turned on, then it will look for an engine cranking signal from the crank sensor or distributor and then it will start to control the coil. That is why I needed the engine size and to let you know that it must have power and a sense that the engine is cranking, or no coil activation. 3.3, 3.8L it could be a bad crank sensor, these are the most common. But the PCM does fail. Rarely though. It is inside of poured gel. The codes that a scanner(small diagnostic screen) tells the technician helps to get to a starting point so all else can be ruled out before replacing a part that a customer or Chrysler must pay for. If it is wrong, the technician pays, so we do not make same mistake twice. Coil pack? Means your dealing with a 3.3L. I'll check something now. You are not wasting my time. Your van is wasting your time.
Ok, I am back. And UCONN is losing to CINCY. HMMM.
In car fuse number 16 is a 10amp, if your check engine light is on, that should be ok.
Then check two 15amp fuses in the power center fuse box(black with lid) in the engine compartment. One will say engine and the other will say fuel pump.
And one more inside number 3, 20 amp.
The 10 amp fuses are red, 15 are blue and 20 are yellow.
If you have good fuses then see if the large fuses in that power center are ok, they're big plastic ones. Then the codes are checked, the wiring(circuits are tested for continuity(see if they aren't broken) and grounds are checked, if no codes then the PCM goes. You've replaced coil pack, maybe the PCM is not getting a crank sense, or cam, or MAP, they all will cause problems but the cranksensor causes no spark from the coil most of the time, as long as the engine is turning the trans. The crank sensor mounts in the top part of transaxle a little towards the rear. Make sure it is plugged in.
Either you understood me or no, I do hope this beast starts so you can go back to your life and start it and turn the heat on. Lol. OK
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Saturday, November 7th, 2009 AT 8:11 PM
Tiny
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After a month of trying, money spent on parts (to be returned when they were not the problem) and about 10 mins. From calling a salvage yard it turned out it was a 30 second fix. We checked all the parts and fuses under the hood and all came up good. What we didn't check were the fuses under the dash (didn't think there'd be fuses under there dealing with ignition).
We were wrong, checked the "ignition feed" fuse and it was blown, replaced it and started right up.

Thanks for all your help.
Triviaman
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Monday, November 23rd, 2009 AT 5:05 PM
Tiny
CH112063
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I looked at the date because I had forgotton about your van. I am happy you answered with good news, I would keep a box on hand. Especially now, that you have a reliable way to make sure there is voltage to the fuse, as even a good fuse, only means a good fuse, not a complete circuit. A good ending. And a handy 12 volt test light. Good for many future problems.
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Monday, November 23rd, 2009 AT 8:05 PM

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