Intermittent no start issues

Tiny
JENNYG
  • MEMBER
  • 2003 ACURA TL
  • V6
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 156,000 MILES
I drive my car for about 20 minutes straight turn off engine to run in to do a short errand come out 15 minutes later and car does not start. You can hear it's trying to crank over but doesn't. I have to wait about 30 minutes and it starts right up. It doesn't happen all the time when I do a short stop and I can make several errands in one day and it starts up each time. This issue is happen occasionally. I have taken it to the Acura dealership twice and they couldn't find anything on diagnostic except this last time they said my spark plugs are bad and need replacing but wasn't the cause of my issue. I have taken it to another small mom/pop mechanic and same thing. Unfortunately they can't get the car to replicate the same issue so hard to diagnose. The transmission was placed by dealership approximately 5 years after having and Acura paid for it so I know I can get more out of the car in terms of mileage. I use this car for running errands on the weekend since I have a company car I use in the week. I am a female that doesn't know anything about cars and frustrated not been able to find a answer. Before I try one more time taking it into a shop does anyone have any suggestions on what this could be? My car alarm did randomly come on for no reason few months ago and wouldn't shut off so my neighbor pulled a fuse in order to get it to stop. Don't know related but this issue with my car occasional not starting has been going on for over a year. I don't want to see it if I can figure out what the issue is. I would greatly appreciate anyone's advice and suggestions on what to do. Regards, Jenny
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Saturday, January 11th, 2020 AT 10:20 AM

7 Replies

Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Since it is happening on longer trips, my first suspect is that you have a bad crankshaft position sensor. When they start going bad, they are affected by heat. If the vehicle is driven longer, it gets hotter. When you turn the key off and it sits for a short time, it may be allowing the sensor to fail. Then, after 30 minutes, when it cools off, it once again makes an internal connection and works.

Do me a favor. Take a look through these two links. The first explains the sensor I'm referring to and the second discusses symptoms. See if the symptoms seem to mirror what you experience. Also, note that under certain conditions, this sensor will not set a diagnostic trouble code. It would physically need tested when the engine won't start.

____________________________

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/how-a-crank-shaft-angle-sensor-works

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/symptoms-of-a-bad-crankshaft-sensor

___________________________

I attached a picture below of the sensor specific to your vehicle. Let me know your thoughts on the symptoms.

Take care,
Joe
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Saturday, January 11th, 2020 AT 5:27 PM
Tiny
JENNYG
  • MEMBER
Hi Joe, Thank you for getting back to me I greatly appreciate your feedback. I looked at the symptoms and my car is not stalling. Early this morning my car started right away, no issues drove it 2.5 miles where it sat for an hour. Started back up no issue and made two different stops to grocery store and no issues. Came home let it sit for 10-15 min started right up. I am trying to get it to duplicate the issue so I can capture it on video to see if you can diagnose from that. Unfortunately the times I have taken it to the repair shops it doesn't act up for them. I could go days of driving it no problem then randomly it will have a hard time turning over so have to wait. Frustrating issue.
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Sunday, January 12th, 2020 AT 10:15 AM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Hi,

Not a problem. I will be here when you get info or duplicate the concern. Cars have a mind of their own and do what they want. LOL The trips you took may not have allowed the engine to get hot enough to cause an issue with the sensor I mentioned. If it is possible, when it won't start, check to see if there is spark to the plugs. Here is a link that explains how. If you feel comfortable with it, give it a try.

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/how-to-test-an-ignition-system

I will watch for your reply.

Joe
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Sunday, January 12th, 2020 AT 4:44 PM
Tiny
JENNYG
  • MEMBER
Hi Joe, I drove my car the other day on the toll for 17 miles straight without stopping pulled in driveway turned off engine for about 10 minutes and it started right back up. Would it need to sit longer before trying to turn it back on to be the sensor issue?
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Monday, January 20th, 2020 AT 5:01 PM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Hi,

It is all based on temperature. I know where I am, it's been near 15 F, so it would stay somewhat cool just based on that. Also, since it is an intermittent issue, anything is possible.

Joe
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Monday, January 20th, 2020 AT 7:31 PM
Tiny
JENNYG
  • MEMBER
It's been around 50 degrees in Dallas. If it is the sensor approximately how much do you think to fix it?
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Tuesday, January 21st, 2020 AT 7:16 AM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
First, here is a link with general directions for replacement:

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/crankshaft-angle-sensor-replacement

Here are the directions specific to your vehicle. Pic 1 correlates with the directions.

_______________________________

2003 Acura 3.2TL V6-3.2L SOHC
CKP Sensor Replacement
Vehicle Powertrain Management Sensors and Switches - Powertrain Management Sensors and Switches - Computers and Control Systems Crankshaft Position Sensor Service and Repair Procedures CKP Sensor Replacement
CKP SENSOR REPLACEMENT
CKP Sensor Replacement
1. Move the auto-tensioner to remove tension from the alternator belt, then remove the alternator belt.
2. Loosen the adjusting bolt, locknut and mounting bolt, then remove the Power Steering (P/S) pump belt.
3. Remove the dipstick and tube.
4. Remove the crankshaft pulley.
5. Remove the upper and lower covers.

pic 1

6. Remove the Crankshaft Position (CKP) sensor from the oil pump.
7. Install the CKP sensor in the reverse order of removal.

________________________________________________-

If you look at picture 2, it shows the OEM part cost, which is high. You can get a quality aftermarket for about half the cost. The bad part is the labor. It calls for 4.6 hours labor.

Let me know if this helps answer your question. Also, I wanted to note that the above link indicates a general install. To access the sensor on your vehicle, you have to remove the timing belt cover, which is where the labor time increases.

Take care and let me know if I can help.

Joe
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Tuesday, January 21st, 2020 AT 5:00 PM

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