Noise after changing both front hub bearing assemblies

Tiny
RYANSHOE92
  • MEMBER
  • 2004 PONTIAC GRAND AM
  • 3.4L
  • V6
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 140,000 MILES
Changed both front hub bearing assemblies and now makes a growling noise. Not sure what to look at next. Did not do it before they were changed.
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Monday, January 16th, 2017 AT 9:23 PM

8 Replies

Tiny
STEVE W.
  • EXPERT
Why did you change the hubs if it was not making noise? With this new noise does it change if you turn right/left? It is possible you got a bad bearing out of the box.
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Tuesday, January 17th, 2017 AT 2:00 AM
Tiny
RYANSHOE92
  • MEMBER
No noise when turning. ABS light, brake light and service vehicle light was on.
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Tuesday, January 17th, 2017 AT 3:46 AM
Tiny
STEVE W.
  • EXPERT
Okay, I would put it in the air and do a good visual, could be something rubbing the fins in the rotor. Then strip the brakes off the noisy side and see what you have. Very possible you got a bad bearing out of the box either the sensor rubbing the tone wheel or just a bad bearing, especially with the parts quality these days.
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Tuesday, January 17th, 2017 AT 8:13 AM
Tiny
RYANSHOE92
  • MEMBER
Thanks.
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Tuesday, January 17th, 2017 AT 8:17 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Hi guys. I would like to add a comment of value. The top reason for a noisy new wheel bearing is improper installation procedures. Specifically, the axle nut must be tightened to specs before any vehicle weight is placed on it. It's mostly do-it-yourselfers who set the car on the ground so the tire will keep the wheel from turning so they can tighten the nut. At that point the bearing has been damaged. I even saw this happen to two new front bearings on a car with no engine or transmission. It was in the body shop being repaired for crash damage, and was pushed outside while waiting for parts. Once I got the car for the alignment, both bearings had to be replaced again.

It is a simple step to stick a tool in the rotor's cooling fins so the axle nut can be tightened. Do not know if this applies to this car, but it is worth considering.
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Tuesday, January 17th, 2017 AT 1:42 PM
Tiny
RYANSHOE92
  • MEMBER
I never install them on the ground that is a amateur failure issue but thanks
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Tuesday, January 17th, 2017 AT 7:17 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Yes, do-it-yourselfers do this a lot, but I've seen experienced mechanics do the same thing, including one who still refuses to believe this is an issue. There are "mechanics" out there who think a failing brake master cylinder can be repaired by adding power steering fluid to the brake fluid! We don't assume anything any more, which is why we always include these warning comments. Please don't take offense. We also know that most mechanics know these things already.
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Wednesday, January 18th, 2017 AT 4:01 PM
Tiny
RYANSHOE92
  • MEMBER
None taken
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Wednesday, January 18th, 2017 AT 7:30 PM

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