New water pump gasket leak

Tiny
DAVID LOOMIS
  • MEMBER
  • 2003 LINCOLN NAVIGATOR
  • 5.4L
  • V8
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 104,000 MILES
Water pump gasket failed at 104,000 miles. New water pump was supplied with urethane o-ring gasket. Applied small amount of silicone o-ring lubricant. The unit fit snugly but not too snugly in the block cavity. Filled with water to check for leaks. Overnight, significant leaks observed at 9 to 12 o'clock position. Removed pump and closely examined mounting surfaces. Some residue remained in o-ring groove, but also, the groove disappeared at the 9 o'clock to 1 o'clock position. Only flat, smooth, clean iron at this position. Thoroughly sanded and cleaned groove and flat area. Reinstalled using thick, heavily applied silicone o-ring grease. No leaks overnight. Started motor and observed leak at 9 - 12 o'clock position. Leaks stopped after four or five minutes running motor. Idled motor for five hours with chemicals to flush rust. No leak. Drained and refilled with water to flush out chemicals. Leak observed again for four minutes, and then, it stopped. Close inspection now shows periodic leak of several drops appearing at 9 o'clock position after motor is warm - not enough to accumulate and flow to the ground. Cold starts always create a five inch diameter wet spot on the ground. My tentative conclusion is that the o-ring groove gap in the block is a manufacturing defect. Any ideas for a solution. I am taught and believe gasket compound must never, never, never be used on an o-ring seal because (1) it interferes with the proper operation of o-ring sealing dynamics, and (2) it could make future removal of the water pump impossible.
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Saturday, November 17th, 2018 AT 8:59 PM

3 Replies

Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Hi and thanks for using 2CarPros. Com.

I agree with you. Gaskets, o-rings need to be installed on clean and dry surfaces unless otherwise recommended.

First, I suggest getting a new o-ring from a dealer. Often times the aftermarket ones are not of the same quality. Next, do not use sand paper to clean the area. Also, when you reinstall the pump, make sure it is aligned prior to install. If you turn it to make bolt holes align, the o-ring can be damaged.

Here are the directions: They show a sequence for removing bolts. When tightening them to 18 ft/lbs, follow the reverse order of removal. The attached pictures correlate with these directions. Make sure to lube the o-ring with coolant as recommended at the end of the directions.

______________________________________

Remove the bolts in the sequence shown, and the water pump. See pic
Wipe the water pump mounting surface with a soft cloth if necessary.

CAUTION: Do not rotate the water pump housing once installed in the engine. Damage to the O-ring seal can occur, causing the water pump to leak.

NOTE: Install a new O-ring seal and lubricate with Motorcraft Premium Engine Coolant E2FZ-19549-AA, FSFZ-19549-CC in Oregon, CXC-10 in Canada or equivalent meeting Ford specification ESE-M97B44-A (green color) or Motorcraft Premium Gold Engine Coolant VC-7-A meeting Ford specification WSS-M97B51-A1 (yellow color). Use the same coolant that was drained from the engine.

To install, reverse the removal procedure.

__________________________________

Let me know if this helps.

Joe
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Saturday, November 17th, 2018 AT 9:27 PM
Tiny
DAVID LOOMIS
  • MEMBER
Upon cleaning with Scotchbrite pad and closer inspection, we found small corrosion pits the entire length of the o-ring groove and extensive, deep pits extending beyond the width of the groove at the 9 and 12 o'clock positions where the groove meets the flat, ungrooved section. We created a groove where none existed using a 1/8" carbide steel ball-shaped cutter held perpendicularly by ad hoc jig/tool holder. We resurfaced the existing grove using the same tool. The resulting groove was slightly deeper and wide than the factory groove and slightly ragged and rough. We applied a thin coat of J-B Weld to the entire groove and cured it overnight. Sanded using P800 sandpaper to level and smooth the groove. Polished with P1500 sandpaper and heavy cutting compound to a medium gloss. This technique stopped the leak for one week of daily use, but longevity is in question. Seems like a lot of tedious work. Use of anaerobic sealer on flanges will be plan D, but the flanges nearly disappear to less than 1/16" for about 3/4" at the 7-8 o'clock position to make room for the right-side timing chain cover. Should plan D fail, it seems block replacement is required. I conclude the gasket failure resulted from a combination of improper groove machining at the factory and improper use of plain water as a coolant for an extended period of time. Note: Adhesion of J-B Weld to machined iron seems to be excellent. It could not be chipped even from sharp corners of the flange deposited by unsteady hands. To remove, it required sanding and polishing, as above.
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Sunday, December 2nd, 2018 AT 8:02 PM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Wow! You have done a lot already. If you are unable to seal it with the o-ring, then I would try using a gasket maker and o-ring. Just make sure to follow the directions, allowing the gasket maker to begin setting before tightening.
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Monday, December 3rd, 2018 AT 5:04 PM

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