Multiple OBD codes

Tiny
ANGELA JOHNSON2
  • MEMBER
  • 2002 LINCOLN CONTINENTAL
  • 4.6L
  • V8
  • AWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 265,000 MILES
My car started shutting off or almost shutting off when I would stop. I cleaned the throttle body, got a new air filter, and new MAF sensor and that stopped the problem. Not even a week later "check transmission" warning came up. I parked the car immediately and let it set for a few days and next time I drove it no problem for a few days. Then the same warning came up again and car would not go more than forty five mph and rpms were right around 3000 and holding. I stopped and called AAA and got towed home. I checked the codes and the following came up: 102 135 141 155 161 443 420 743 750 755 760 1451 1747.
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Tuesday, January 3rd, 2017 AT 12:43 AM

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Tiny
JOHNNY G.JR
  • MEMBER
This web site has a definition for all those codes except for number 102. 135-161 deals with 02 sensor heaters malfunctions, both sides of exhaust, all 4 sensors. 420 and 433 catalyst system efficiency below threshold bank 1, 743 torque conv. Clutch circuit electrical, 750 shift solenoid"A" malfunction, 755 shift sol."B",760 shift sol."C",1451=Diagnostic module tank leakage"switching solenoid control circuit signal low. 1747=EPC solenoid open circuit.
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Tuesday, January 3rd, 2017 AT 10:26 AM
Tiny
ANGELA JOHNSON2
  • MEMBER
I was able to look up the codes and see that information for myself. What I have not been able to find is what the possible causes could be and where to start as far as diagnosing problems.
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Tuesday, January 3rd, 2017 AT 1:30 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Logically, you know the car did not suddenly develop a dozen totally different problems, so look for something all those circuits have in common. The first thing to consider is the Ford engineers like to run the ground wires for many circuits into a single terminal that gets bolted to the body sheet metal or engine. Look for a ground terminal that is rusted off first.

Also follow the various wiring harnesses around to see if one fell down onto hot exhaust parts. Melted wires usually affect different circuits at different times, but if a twelve volt feed wire is affected, that can cause a fuse to blow that feeds many circuits.

Also, consider that some time in the past, a mechanic may have needed to unplug a connector with many wires in it. It is common for the locking tabs to become brittle and break off, and it's not unheard of for a connector to be hard to reconnect, and it may feel like it snapped together when it really did not. It can take minutes, days or years to pull apart from the normal rocking of the engine. A loose connector between the body and engine or the body and transmission can cause a failure in multiple circuits. Also, look for corrosion between multiple terminals inside a connector. When that corrosion gets wet, it will conduct current from one wire that has voltage on it to an adjacent wire that is supposed to be turned off. Both circuits can do the wrong thing resulting in multiple fault codes.
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Tuesday, January 3rd, 2017 AT 1:44 PM
Tiny
STEVE W.
  • EXPERT
Looking at the ground in the wiring diagram, The PCM uses ground G106, located to the right of the PCM on the firewall at the center of the engine bay. I would remove the screw, clean it real well and reinstall. Even a bit of rust would mess up the signal returns.
It grounds all the items on the list (including the MAF) through a splice in the harness just a few inches away from the ground connection, I would check it as well. Moisture could get in and cause havoc.
Next would be to follow the O2 sensor wires, if one of those hit the exhaust it could cause a short that would drop the reference voltage and cause the same issue.

Don't overlook the battery cables themselves either. They need to be clean at both ends and the ground strap that ties the engine to the body is another item often missed.
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Tuesday, January 3rd, 2017 AT 4:17 PM

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