2001 Mitsubishi Galant Stalling while stopped

Tiny
GALANTGIRL
  • MEMBER
  • 2001 MITSUBISHI GALANT
  • 4 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 20,000 MILES
I have a 2001 Mitsubishi Galant with alittle over 200,000 miles. I recently had my IAC motor replaced and my throttle cleaned, however, recently my car has been jerking while stopped and now it is stalling out after a couple of minutes. I have been informed that I may need a catalytic converter. Do you believe that is the problem?
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Wednesday, August 13th, 2008 AT 9:14 AM

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Tiny
KLSHIEL
  • MEMBER
If the Catalytic converter was clogged the engine would have problems at higher RPMs and under a load. If the catalytic converter element was ineffective you would have O2 sensor codes and a check engine light. This would effect how the engine ran, and could cause simular problems. The problem is the air fuel ratio at idle is off. This can be caused by a sensor reading like the O2 sensors being off or an actuator like IAC being off. Other sensors to check are MAP/MAF sensor
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Wednesday, August 13th, 2008 AT 9:29 AM
Tiny
GALANTGIRL
  • MEMBER
Thanks so much. My check engine light is o so I guess I need a new converter. I was also told that a quick fix in the mean time would be to unplug the electrical connector controlling the converter from the side of the transmission. Will that work for about a week?
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Wednesday, August 13th, 2008 AT 9:58 AM
Tiny
KLSHIEL
  • MEMBER
There is no electrical connector to control the Catalytic converter. The Catalytic converter is just a honey comb element inside a tube that causes the exhaust gases to convert into safe elements. This is automatic. You can unplug the O2 sensors and put the engine into limp in mode which will burn rich and eat gas rather thatn stall. A Torque Converter is in the transmission. This may have a controller you can unplug to get desired operation, but I doubt you want to do that. A torque converter that is dragging on the engine at all times could cause your problem, but this is expensive and rare. This would cause the car to be harder to keep stopped and roll faster than normal at idle.
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Wednesday, August 13th, 2008 AT 10:18 AM

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