2002 Kia Sedona Engine Overheating

Tiny
ANTRUM.ORANGEHOME.CO.UK@F
  • MEMBER
  • 2002 KIA SEDONA
  • 4 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 82,000 MILES
This is a Diesel engine which when it overheats the
revs shut down to tickover until it cools down
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have the same problem?
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Saturday, September 19th, 2009 AT 12:23 PM

3 Replies

Tiny
KHLOW2008
  • EXPERT
Hi antrum,

Thank you for the donation and sorry for the delay in replying. I do not know why but your question was not at top of our list so it was missed out.

We do not have any info in our database for diesel engines of your vehicle so I do not have anything to fall back on. What I have to offer is only my experience with diesel engines and hope is sufficient to assist in getting the problem resolved.

Before we proceed, I need to understand the situation and here are some questions for you.

1. What have you done so far?
2. When did problem start and was it gradual, from minor and getting worse?
3. Was anything done/happened prior to it happening?
4. Is the coolant in the radiator depleting?
5. Is the reserve ( recovery ) tank constant, depleting or increasing?
6. Is cooling fan mechanical with fluid couplings, electrical or both?
7. When does the overheating occur, at idling, cruising or high speed driving?

Sorry if I am asking too many questions but they are required to understand what is happening. If you have any other information that you think might help, please let me know.
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Wednesday, September 23rd, 2009 AT 12:24 PM
Tiny
ANTRUM.ORANGEHOME.CO.UK@F
  • MEMBER
The Sedona I was asking the? Is my Daughters who is on Holiday in the South of France Since I was contacted by her she has had a mechanic out to check the car and discovered that there was an air lock in the cooling system which he fixed nd the car seems to beO/K
John
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Wednesday, September 23rd, 2009 AT 5:39 PM
Tiny
KHLOW2008
  • EXPERT
When there is any air lock in the cooling system, it usually is caused by a leak somewhere or a bad radiator cap. Bleeding the system is only a temporary measure unless faulty parts or leaks are replaced/rectified.

Be sure to monitor the coolant level closely to ensure it is not depleting.
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Thursday, September 24th, 2009 AT 10:32 AM

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