Water on the passenger floor

Tiny
MAUICRAIG
  • MEMBER
  • 1998 JEEP CHEROKEE
  • 6 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 70,270 MILES
I am getting water on the front passenger floor and it is heavy most of the time. What could be leaking? I can not see anything?
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Wednesday, March 31st, 2010 AT 8:31 PM

34 Replies

Tiny
BLUELIGHTNIN6
  • EXPERT
You certain it isn't coolant? It's possible that the heater core has an internal leak and is leaking into the floorboard. Other signs of a faulty heater core include slight overheating of engine, coolant loss in radiator and light foggy film on inside of windshield when heater is on. If it is just water than you will want to inspect the door and window rubber seals.
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Wednesday, March 31st, 2010 AT 8:33 PM
Tiny
CJ MEDEVAC
  • EXPERT
See my profile, Have you been using your A/C or Defrost alot?

If you have, condensate forms on your evaporator (sorta a radiator looking A/C thingee in your heater box!)

Eventually, it forms bigger water drops, and falls into the bottom of your heater box.

The water can only escape one way. The CONDENSATE DRAIN!

IT MAY BE STOPPED UP!

Since I do not know the technicals of your rig, I can tell you sorta where to look.

Look on your firewall, maybe low, get an idea of where the bottom of the heater box is. Look at same height on the firewall. Probably Center or towards the passenger side.

I didn't say this would be real EZ!

Maybe look for some/ or not, dampness around a rubber apperattus (sp) or rubber tube. When you locate it, do one of the following:

Poke something in it, make water flow out. Sometimes a bad Idea.

"Why", you say, in an indignant manner.

"Been there done that", Turddog says, wagging his tail, and continues, without using quotations!

If you poke it, You shove the blockage back in, you'll be doing this over and over.

Found 2 ways to do this well, Using a rubber hose and/ or 1/4---3/8 copper tubing.

Dependent upon the accessibilty to the drain in a tight spot, you might have to bend the tubing and do some "Fishing" to get it into the condensate drain tube.

Once this task is achieved, Rig the tubing and or combo with rubber hose, into the hose of your "Shop-Vac". Using Duct Tape or Other, seal it all together.

You already know what to do next. DO IT!

Keep in mind, we are not performing heater box orthoscopic surgery, do not shove it past the firewall, you may tear or diconnect the drain, Me can't helpy you then!

Sometimes there is alot of water!

Please let me know if my method worked for you (OR NOT), and did I explain it well enough?

Love, Turddog
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Wednesday, March 31st, 2010 AT 10:30 PM
Tiny
12PAUL12
  • MEMBER
The problem is the condensate drain tube on the firewall is not long enough and the water makes it back into the jeep. I fixed mine by adding a rubber tube and a hose clamp to extend it down further. So now it doesn't drain back into my jeep it drains to the ground outside.
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+1
Thursday, April 22nd, 2010 AT 4:28 PM
Tiny
JNERD780
  • MEMBER
  • 1998 JEEP CHEROKEE
  • 6 CYL
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 112,000 MILES
I recently wrote a question about my soaked floor boards on my jeep. I'm not sure what I'm looking for when get underneath the Jeep. Does anyone have a photo of the a/c plenum so I know what I am looking for when I get under the jeep?
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Tuesday, February 26th, 2019 AT 5:45 PM (Merged)
Tiny
HAGERT
  • MEMBER
A plenum, in air handling jargon, is the air filled space between the heat exchanger(s) and the occupied area that is climate controlled. In your example, the plenum should have a drain hole at it's lowest point for the condensation from the A/C evaporator to be jettisoned or over boarded as it were. Look for a plastic box that is mounted up against the fire wall and search for a vent or port that may be occluded.
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Tuesday, February 26th, 2019 AT 5:45 PM (Merged)
Tiny
CHARLES ANDERSON
  • MEMBER
  • 1998 JEEP CHEROKEE
Hi, my son has a 98 JGC, 4 cylinder 2 wheel drive, SUV. His car overheated so I replaced the water pump, refilled the fluids and started it up. Once operating temperture was passed, it began to overheat again and the water pump started to chirp.

Thinking I could have gotten a bad pump, I bought a 2nd. As well as a new thermostat.

As I removed the water pump I noticed that there seemed to be no water within the engine block or lower radiator hose attached to the bottom of the water pump.

I installed the 2nd. New water pump and thermostat,
added water and antifreeze, cranked it up and let it run. After a few minutes the engine began to run hot again.

I happened to touch the radiator cap and noticed that it wasn't hot. I removed the cap and the water within was not hot nor under any pressure.

Do you have to "bleed" the circulation system? Could it be a control valve of some sort. Could the rediator have clogged it self up so compleately? Help!
I have donated.
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Tuesday, February 26th, 2019 AT 5:45 PM (Merged)
Tiny
CARUNDELL
  • MEMBER
Hey Charles,
That certainly sounds like either air trapped in the block or a clogged radiator. Unless you have a "spill proof" fill setup its a messy bleed. You can try to fill it and let it settle a bit, then fill some more. But the way I find that works the best is to run the vehicle with the cap off (assuming the radiator is not clogged), your going to make a mess but it will bleed of the air. Another option is to fill it thru one of the heater hoses, but thats slow and messy too. (But at least your bypassing the tstat and filling the block) I would recommend to verify the condition of the radiator and try one of those fill methods. Let us know!

Chris
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Tuesday, February 26th, 2019 AT 5:45 PM (Merged)
Tiny
ANDERS110
  • MEMBER
  • 1997 JEEP CHEROKEE
Had this vehicle for about 9 months. I've started to notice that it randomly will hesitate for a moment on take off, but then it gets up and goes. Today everything went downhill though. I drove it this morning and came home parked it in the driveway for a few hours until work. Went out to leave for work and it wouldn't start. I jumped it using a jump pack, and found that I had not left any lights or anything on so I was confused. On the way to the babysitters (only 1/2 mile away) the battery gauge jumped as high as it would go and then the check gauges light came on. I pulled into the driveway and turned off the car in hopes that would help, however it would not start again and then I started hearing a weird sound from the passenger side under the dash. We found that if we opened the glove box the sound stopped, if we closed it the sound started again. My husband removed a little plug and the sound stopped. We jumped it again and took it home, but the battery gauge did the same thing. While inspecting the car we found that the front floor was damp and the rear floor was completely sopping wet. Any ideas? I'm completely car illiterate and don't have a bunch of money to be putting into uneeded parts. Anybody that can help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks so much
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Tuesday, February 26th, 2019 AT 5:45 PM (Merged)
Tiny
GRICHARDS
  • MEMBER
Noise in dash, Alt. Gauge, sopping wet. OK, sounds like 3 seperate problems. The noise in/under the dash stopping when glove box opened is one of those "gotta be there" sounds, but might be related to having a loose trim panel.
The sopping wet on floorboard sounds like the A.C. Evaporator condensate drain hose is clogged, broken or loose. (Please see my response to "Jeep A.C. Leak on first page of this forum for more details).
The Altenator gauge maxing out could be a charging system/altenator problem, OR - check the cells in your battery. If your cell(s) are low on water this could cause the altenator to overcharge (easy check). With the altenator, you can remove it and take it to a local parts store where they will bench test it for free (Autozone or call around) and tell you if it's still good. Another thing to do BEFORE removing the altenator - you have a 97 Cherokee, and it should have an onboard "self-diagnosis" feature that will tell the engine computer to spit out codes for problem area(s). Please see my response to "Cranks, but no start" on the first forum page for detailed instructions on how to do this. If it gives you a "41" code, the problem will be charging/altenator related and yu just might have to take the alt. For testing. Hope this helps a little, GOOD LUCK!
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Tuesday, February 26th, 2019 AT 5:45 PM (Merged)
Tiny
GRICHARDS
  • MEMBER
Went so fast I almost forgot to mention - Make sure your battery IS still good! Test with multimeter if you can, take to parts store for free test if you can't. Dead battery/dead cell(s) = high altenator ooutput.
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Tuesday, February 26th, 2019 AT 5:45 PM (Merged)
Tiny
CHRISBL
  • MEMBER
  • 1996 JEEP CHEROKEE
My Jeep does not overheat but after running the A/C for a short time the water in the reservoir boils and spews out. I have replaced the thermostat and the water pump. What else could be my problem?
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Tuesday, February 26th, 2019 AT 5:45 PM (Merged)
Tiny
MIKEYBDMAN
  • MEMBER
I would suspect the fan clutch. Here is a test you can perform.

To check the clutch fan, disconnect the bimetal spring and rotate 90 counterclockwise. This disables the temperature-controlled, free-wheeling feature and the clutch performs like a conventional fan. If this cures the overheating condition, replace the clutch fan.
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Tuesday, February 26th, 2019 AT 5:45 PM (Merged)
Tiny
CHRISBL
  • MEMBER
The Jeep actually doesn't overheat. It just boils water in the reservoir. Would you still suggest the fan clutch?
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Tuesday, February 26th, 2019 AT 5:45 PM (Merged)
Tiny
MIKEYBDMAN
  • MEMBER
This is odd. What does your water temperature gauge read? It should regulate the water temerature at 195 degrees, and the water that transfers to your resevoir is after it goes thru the radiator. So, either it is overheating and boiling the water, or you have something pressurizing the fluid.
It makes sense that normally the system can handle a load and keep the engine cool, but with the extra load of the airconditioning compressor, and the added temperature of the air crossing the condensor, it is just a little more than your system can handle. If your water temperature gauge is bad, you might not know how high your temp is really going.
Knowing that water boils at 212 degrees, and even higher with radiator fluid mixed in, then I think you are getting hotter than you think.
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Tuesday, February 26th, 2019 AT 5:45 PM (Merged)
Tiny
CHRISBL
  • MEMBER
It never gets above 215 or so. Usually stays around 210.

My gage acts like it should. It is cold when I start the engine then warms up to about 215 and then backs down to about 210.
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Tuesday, February 26th, 2019 AT 5:45 PM (Merged)
Tiny
KEVINJMCGUIRE
  • MEMBER
  • 2002 JEEP CHEROKEE
  • V8
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 67,000 MILES
Hello and thank you for your help, my jeep is leaking water from the front, it's not the heater, I replaced the water pump. Did the refill thing the coolent bleeded added fluid. Took it for a drive came back no water no leak, nope I am still getting water about dead center of the jeep in the front under the radator. But I cant see where the water is comming from, unlike before when the old water pump was in, I could see the leak. Can the clutch on the fan go bad. Also today when I started up and went for a drive, very little water, thought maybe overflow, then witht the engine on 3000rpm for 15sec no water seen anywhere, turn off engine slow drip under the radator or ishould say collecting there.
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Tuesday, February 26th, 2019 AT 5:45 PM (Merged)
Tiny
MIKEYBDMAN
  • MEMBER
Ok, if your temp overshoots like you stated, that is usually an indication of air in your heads. Might have a leak in the head gasket. This could explain the bubling water if the compression of a cylinder is over pressurizing your radiator. That can push fluid out of the resevoir. To check this, you will need to do a compression check on all 6 cylinders. If you have one or two that are a lot lower than the others, I would suspect a leaking head gasket, or possibly a cracked head. I am going to post the D/O of the cooling system. Maybe something will set off a light in your situation.

PURPOSE
Cooling System - Circulates coolant through the engine to remove heat developed by combustion.

Water Pump - Circulates coolant through entire system, block, head, thermostat, radiator, and heater core.

Thermostat - Allows for a rapid engine warm-up and maintains a minimum operating temperature.

NOTE: A normally operating thermostat does not control the upper limit for coolant temperature. The maximum temperature is controlled by the amount of air flow drawn across the radiator.

Cooling Fan - Provides airflow across the radiator to remove heat from the coolant.

Fan Clutch - Controls the upper limit for coolant temperature. The clutch engages to prevent the coolant from reaching its boiling point.

Fan Shroud - Forces air from the cooling fan to be drawn directly across the radiator.

CAUTION: Operation of the engine without the fan shroud significantly reduces the cooling ability of the engine.

Radiator - Transfers heat from the coolant to the air passing across it. The cooling ability of the radiator is directly dependent on the amount of air flowing across it and the amount of coolant flowing though it.

TEMPERATURE CONTROL
Cold Engine
With a cold engine the thermostat is closed, forcing coolant to re-circulate through the engine block and head assembly. This results in a rapid warm up of the coolant.

When the coolant temperature reaches the thermostat set point, the thermostat will begin to open, allowing coolant to flow through the radiator.

NOTE: The upper radiator hose will remain cold until the thermostat begins to open, at this point it will rapidly warm up. This is a quick and easy indication of when the thermostat opens.

Warm Engine
With the thermostat open, the cooling system temperature will now be dependent on the amount of air flow across the radiator.

The amount of air flow is dependent upon:

- Driving speed.
- Cooling fan clutch engagement.

Under normal conditions, driving the vehicle in excess of 25 mph will provide enough air flow across the radiator to sufficiently cool the engine.

Under severe conditions, such as climbing a steep hill, the coolant temperature may rise enough to fully engage the fan clutch, thus adding additional air flow across the radiator.

During stop and go driving, the fan clutch will engage to provide sufficient air flow across the radiator.
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Tuesday, February 26th, 2019 AT 5:45 PM (Merged)
Tiny
BMRFIXIT
  • EXPERT
The clutch can go bad but will not leak coolant
I would check radiator hoses and clamp
and keep an eye on the coolant level if its going down
if not may be old coolant collected in the shroud area
also pressure test is another option
check thermostat housing and gasket
good luck
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Tuesday, February 26th, 2019 AT 5:45 PM (Merged)
Tiny
CHRISBL
  • MEMBER
Hmm. This is making me think the fan clutch because this happens after stop and go traffic. Also when I was testing it out today I let it sit running for a while then with the A/C for a while. Everything was fine while running but as soon as I cut it off the reservoir began to fill and bubble.
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Tuesday, February 26th, 2019 AT 5:45 PM (Merged)
Tiny
MIKEYBDMAN
  • MEMBER
If you decide to replace the fan clutch, usually auto zone will lend you any special tools if needed to replace it. Chevy's are bad about needing tools for things like that.
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Tuesday, February 26th, 2019 AT 5:45 PM (Merged)

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