2006 Ford Taurus please help

Tiny
EMMARODGERS73
  • MEMBER
  • 2006 FORD TAURUS
  • 6 CYL
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 73,911 MILES
On January 26, 2008 I got a two wheel brake service, left front new disc brake rotor, right front new brake rotor, clean and adjust rear brakes, and replaced my left front bearing. Since I have had these services done, I have had nothing but problems with my brake system. I noticed that when I traveled long distances that I would start to smell something near my front brakes burning. I would pull over and I could see the smoke coming from under the car near the driver's side brakes. When I got back in the car, the brakes would go all the way to the floor and would barely stop. So I turned the car off and turned then turned it back on and the brakes worked fine. My problem is that this only happens when I drive for a long period of time or when I have to keep stopping on my brakes. I have taken the car back to the shop several times, but they find nothing wrong. These are the only repairs besides oil changes that I have had done to my car. Please help!
Do you
have the same problem?
Yes
No
Monday, December 29th, 2008 AT 12:15 PM

5 Replies

Tiny
JGAROFALO
  • MEMBER
Your problem appears to be the brake calipers, but there is a small diagnostic that can be done to prove it.
When the brakes are smoking, you can remove the wheel and crack open the bleeder. If pressure is present, the caliper is OK. Be very careful with this test, as the brakes will be very HOT!

The calipers have plastic pistons. As the temperature of the brakes rises, the pistons expand at a greater rate than the steel body. This causes the caliper to bind, and the brakes to drag. This builds a lot of heat. It starts with some debris buildup between the piston and the body of the caliper. This causes a slight dragging of the brakes. The dragging builds up heat. Over the course of a longer drive, the dragging adds heat, and the heat causes more dragging. At some point, heat and dragging reaches the point of smoking. This heating/dragging cycle happens faster during short drives with frequent braking.

My first instinct is that you are in line for a set of calipers.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Tuesday, December 30th, 2008 AT 5:46 AM
Tiny
EMMARODGERS73
  • MEMBER
When I took the car back to Goodyear, I had them to check the calipers and they said that they were fine. Any other suggestions. By the way, this problem did not start until, I got all of this work done to the brakes.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Tuesday, December 30th, 2008 AT 9:21 AM
Tiny
EMMARODGERS73
  • MEMBER
Also, this problem does not occur when it is cold outside. It happens always(any weather) if I travel somewhwere that is more than thirty miles or more away.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Tuesday, December 30th, 2008 AT 9:28 AM
Tiny
JGAROFALO
  • MEMBER
I'm still pointing to calipers for several reasons.

First, did Goodyaer check the calipers while the brakes were dragging and smoking?

Second, cool weather causes the brakes to run cooler. Keep in mind that the brakes are right in the airstream that is passing by your car as you drive. Cooler air means better cooling for the brakes.

The condition I previously described is caused by aging of the brake components. Small bits of powdered material are released by normal operation of the brakes. In combination with some deterioration of the fluid, these fine particles build up around the seals in calipers and wheel cylinders as well as the moving parts in the master cylinder. Over time, and in combination with the expansion caused by heat from braking, the caliper can begin to bind. It doesn't take a lot to cause the brakes to drag slightly. This builds up even more heat, and it becomes a vicious cycle. Brake drag adds more than normal heat, causing more than normal expansion of the piston. Since the piston is made of a different material than the caliper body, it expands at a greater rate. This causes the caliper to bind even more, and the brakes to drag even more.

Once the brakes cool off, the piston will shrink back to its original size, and the caliper will appear to be acceptably free.

The problem must be diagnosed WHILE the problem is happening. Otherwise, there is no sure diagnosis. If there is no pressure in the line to the caliper, then that only leaves the caliper as the cause of the problem.

IF there is pressure in the line, that would point back to a problem farther back in the system. When you release the brakes, there should be no pressure in the lines. This would be an unusual condition.

Also, you did mention that the pedal had gone to the floor. This is caused by the fluid actually boiling in the brake system.

My feeling is still that your problem is the calipers.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Tuesday, December 30th, 2008 AT 11:15 AM
Tiny
EMMARODGERS73
  • MEMBER
Thanks, I will try this suggestion again. This time I will take it to the Ford place and let them do it. I know that Goodyear drove my car around, but only for five minutes. It takes longer than this for the problem to occur. Will the Ford place know what test to run to figure out the problem?
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Tuesday, December 30th, 2008 AT 2:00 PM

Please login or register to post a reply.

Recommended Guides