1997 Ford Taurus camshaft position sensor

Tiny
KEVLONGHORN
  • MEMBER
  • 1997 FORD TAURUS
  • 6 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 130,000 MILES
Had diagnostic checked. Bad camshaft sensor. Replaced myself. Warning lights went out afterward (briefly). Performed 2nd diagnostic check. Same result, camshaft positioning sensor. What did I do, or not do, to cause this? Camshaft sensor was the only part I replaced. Is there more than just removing and replacing the old sensor with a new sensor? After removal of old sensor I did see what looked to be a small magnetic object that I believe was the broken piece from the old sensor lying on top of whatever part the sensor connects to. I removed the broke magnetic piece and replaced with the new sensor. Advice please?
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Saturday, November 1st, 2008 AT 10:40 PM

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Tiny
BMRFIXIT
  • EXPERT
Did u notice any damage to the plate under the sensor
check it its very common for the magnet to fail and damage the driver shaft
what is it you have for code

need manual CHECK IT @
http://www.2carpros.com/kpages/auto_repair_manuals.htm
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Saturday, November 1st, 2008 AT 11:10 PM
Tiny
KEVLONGHORN
  • MEMBER
I didnt notice but actually didnt know 2 much about what I was looking at. The code was PO340. All I noticed was the broken piece from the sensor. Which by the way looked rusty, along with the driver shaft. Is that normal?
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Saturday, November 1st, 2008 AT 11:37 PM
Tiny
BMRFIXIT
  • EXPERT
1) DTC P0340 This code indicates error has been detected in CMP sensor circuit. Possible causes for this fault are:
* CID circuit open or shorted wiring harness.
* PWR GND or VPWR circuit open (Hall Type CMP).
* SIG RTN circuit open (Variable Reluctance Type CMP).
* Faulty CMP sensor.
* Faulty ICM.
* Faulty PCM.
If engine starts, go to step 2). If engine does not start, go to CIRCUIT TEST A
.
2) Attempt To Generate DTC P0340 Clear PCM memory. Start engine. Raise engine speed to 1500 RPM for 10 seconds. Return to idle speed. Raise speed to 1500 RPM for 10 seconds again. Turn ignition off. Perform QUICK-TEST to retrieve Continuous Memory DTCs. If DTC P0340 is not present, go to CIRCUIT TEST Z. If DTC P0340 is present, go to next step for Hall Type CMP or step 5) for Variable Reluctance Type CMP. 3) Check VPWR Circuit Voltage Turn ignition off. Disconnect CMP wiring harness connector. Turn ignition on. Measure voltage between VPWR terminal at CMP sensor wiring harness connector and negative battery terminal. If voltage is 10.5 volts or more, go to next step. If voltage is less than 10.5 volts, repair open in VREF circuit. Clear PCM memory and repeat QUICK TEST. 4) Check PWR GND To CMP Sensor Turn ignition off. Ensure CMP sensor is disconnected. Measure resistance between PWR GND circuit at CMP sensor wiring harness connector and negative battery terminal. If resistance is less than 5 ohms, go to next step. If resistance is 5 ohms or more, repair open in PWR GND circuit. Clear PCM and repeat QUICK TEST.

5) Check Resistance Of CID Circuits Leave ignition off. Disconnect PCM 104-pin connector. Inspect for damaged terminals and repair if necessary. Install EEC-V Breakout Box (014-000950), leaving PCM disconnected. Measure resistance between test pin No. 85 (CID) at breakout box and CID terminal at CMP sensor wiring harness connector. Also measure resistance as follows:
? On all variable reluctance type, also measure resistance between test pin No. 91 (SIG RTN) and SIG RTN terminal at CMP sensor wiring harness connector.
If each resistance measurement is less than 5 ohms, go to next step. If either resistance is 5 ohms or more, repair open circuit. Clear PCM memory and repeat QUICK TEST.
6) Check CID Circuit For Short To Power Leave CMP sensor disconnected. Turn ignition on. Measure voltage between test pin No. 85 and test pins No. 51 and 103 (PWR GND) at breakout box. If voltage is less 1.0 volt, go to next step. If voltage is 1.0 volt or more, repair CID circuit short to power. Clear PCM memory and repeat QUICK TEST.
7) Check CID Circuit For Short To Ground Turn ignition off. Leave CMP sensor and PCM disconnected. Disconnect scan tester from DLC (if applicable). Measure resistance between test pin No. 85 and test pins No. 51, 103 (PWR GND) and 91 (SIG RTN) at breakout box. If resistance is 10,000 or more, go to next step. If any resistance measurement is less than 10,000 ohms, repair short to ground or SIG RTN in CID circuit. Clear PCM memory and repeat QUICK TEST.
1) 8) Check For Short In PCM Leave ignition off and CMP sensor disconnected. Connect PCM to breakout box. Measure resistance between test pin No. 85 and test pins No. 23, 51, 71, 91, 97 and 103 at breakout box. If each resistance measurement is 500 ohms or more, go to next step for Variable Reluctance type CMP or step 10) for Hall type CMP. If any resistance measurement is less than 500 ohms, replace PCM and repeat QUICK TEST.
2) 9) Check CMP Sensor Output Turn ignition off. Reconnect CMP sensor wiring harness connector. Set DVOM on AC scale to monitor less than 5 volts. Start engine. Measure voltage between test pins No. 85 and test pins No. 51 and 103 while varying engine speed. If voltage varies more than 0.1 volt, replace PCM and repeat QUICK TEST. If voltage does not vary more than 0.1 volt, replace CMP sensor and repeat QUICK TEST.
3) 10) Check CMP Sensor Output Turn ignition off. Disconnect PCM. Ensure CMP sensor is installed properly. Reconnect CMP sensor wiring harness connector. Using starter, bump engine (do not allow engine to start) for at least 10 engine revolutions. Measure voltage between test pins No. 85 and test pins No. 51 and 103. If voltage switches from below 2 volts to more than 8 volts, replace PCM and repeat QUICK TEST. If voltage does not switch as specified, replace CMP sensor and repeat QUICK TEST.
.


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Sunday, November 2nd, 2008 AT 5:43 AM

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