Top end rattling

Tiny
CHRS5503
  • 1998 FORD TAURUS
  • 128,000 MILES

I have a 1998 Ford Taurus efi and the oil light came on so I parked it and cranked it up and there was rattling coming from the top of the engine so I replace the oil pump. Now it is still rattling and sending off codes for the camshaft position sensor. Could that be causing a rattle in the top end or is the car junk now. It hasn't been drove at all with the rattling going on.

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Tuesday, September 4th, 2012 AT 2:17 PM

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Tiny
KHLOW2008
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Ensure oil is getting to top of engine. Since the oil light came up, it can mean the upper portion is running dry. If the timing chains are stretched because of lubrication problem, they could be causing the rattling noises.

What is the code you are getting?

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Tuesday, September 4th, 2012 AT 2:26 PM
Tiny
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The codes are p0340, p 1309, p0161. Is there a easy easy to see if the top end is getting oil without pulling the valve cover? And can the timing cause the oil light to be on causing low oil pressure? And to be clear the camshaft position sensor will not cause the rattling right?

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Tuesday, September 4th, 2012 AT 2:54 PM
Tiny
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The sensor itself would not cause the rattling. The camshafts would. Without pulling the valve cover, it might not be aeasy but you can try removing the oil filler cap and start engine to see if oil is being pushed around within.

P0340 = Camshaft position sensor fault. It could be the wirings or the camshaft is not moving according to where it should be.

P0161 - O2 sensor fault.

P1309 - misfire monitor disabled.

Which engine do you have, DOHC, OHV, 3.0L or 3.4 L

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Tuesday, September 4th, 2012 AT 4:48 PM
Tiny
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I have the ohv engine and according to what I read the oil pump in this car has nothing to do with the timing unlike the other engines.

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Tuesday, September 4th, 2012 AT 4:52 PM
Tiny
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3.0 ohv

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Tuesday, September 4th, 2012 AT 4:53 PM
Tiny
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That make senses. The rattling are due to the hydraulic lifters (HLA) running dry when oil pressure dropped. The lifters have collapsed and if oil pressure is back, you would need to run the engine for a while for the HLA to be pressurised and eliminate the noise. With valves opening insufficiently, it can triggger misfire codes or cause the P1309.

I would start by checking the camshaft position sensor.

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Tuesday, September 4th, 2012 AT 5:08 PM
Tiny
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How long is a while? So the sensor is bad?

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Tuesday, September 4th, 2012 AT 5:54 PM
Tiny
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It could be the sensor or its wiring. Check and ensure the the connector and wire harness is in good order.

Usually after running for a minute or 2 the noise should start to go down and it might take a while before it completly goes away. Try blipping the throttle intermittently to expedite the oil pressure build up.

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Tuesday, September 4th, 2012 AT 5:57 PM
Tiny
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Ok so I pulled the filter and there is no oil getting to it. So what turns the shaft to the oil pump and how do I get to it?

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Wednesday, September 5th, 2012 AT 8:45 PM
Tiny
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Recheck the oil pump installation. Ensure the intermediate shaft had been installed and aligned correctly.

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Wednesday, September 5th, 2012 AT 10:26 PM
Tiny
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Oil pump turned out to be good. It was the camshaft synchronizer. The gear was worn and had broken teeth. I marked the old one and replaced the new one the same way the old one came out, but now I get the code p1309. So can you tell me how to fix that?

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Saturday, September 8th, 2012 AT 2:13 AM
Tiny
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Run the engine till the rattling noise disappears and erase the code and go for a test drive. The valves were noisy so misfires could have occurred and the PCM was instructed to disable the misfire monitoring functioning.

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Saturday, September 8th, 2012 AT 10:17 AM
Tiny
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Sorry didn't mean to post that again I did erase the codes just waiting now sine the motor is quiet. But I did find some metal shavings so what's the best way to flush the motor out?

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Saturday, September 8th, 2012 AT 4:53 PM
Tiny
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The best way is to run the engine and let whatever filings present to sink to bottom and remove the oil pan to clean them out.

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Saturday, September 8th, 2012 AT 6:12 PM
Tiny
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Well the code is back and I'm pretty sure that when I put the new camshaft synchronize in I messed up the timing a Lil bit. When you're at a red light you can definitely feel it missing. So the question is how do you put it back in time?

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Tuesday, September 11th, 2012 AT 6:50 PM
Tiny
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What are all the codes present now?

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Wednesday, September 12th, 2012 AT 8:39 AM
Tiny
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P1309

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Wednesday, September 12th, 2012 AT 12:38 PM
Tiny
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See if these are of any help.

40) DTC P1309

This fault indicates misfire detection monitor malfunction. Turn ignition and all accessories off. Disconnect PCM 104-pin connector. Inspect connector for loose, damaged or corroded terminals. Repair as necessary. Install Breakout Box (014-00959), leaving PCM disconnected. Connect DVOM between test pin No. 85 and test pin No. 51 or 103 at breakout box. Using starter, bump engine in short
bursts for at least 10 revolutions. DO NOT allow engine to start. If voltage switches from less than 2 volts to more than 8 volts, check CMP sensor for correct installation. If sensor is correctly installed, replace PCM. If voltage does not switch from less than 2 volts to more than 8 volts, replace CMP sensor. Perform MISFIRE MONITOR REPAIR VERIFICATION DRIVE CYCLE.

Misfire Monitor Repair Verification Drive Cycle

1. On models with Fuel Level Input (FLI) circuit to PCM terminal No. 12, check fuel gauge and FLI PID value. Misfire monitor can only be tested if fuel gauge reads more than 1/4 full or FLI PID value is more than 15 percent.

2. On all models, start engine. Drive vehicle to a location where vehicle speeds can reach 55-60 MPH and then coast down to 40 MPH without traffic interference. Accelerate at wide open throttle to allow vehicle to shift at red line (if equipped with a tachometer).

3. Immediately return to normal speed limits. Accelerate vehicle speed to 60 MPH for 30 seconds. Take foot off accelerator and coast down to 40 MPH. Stop vehicle and repeat QUICK TEST.

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Wednesday, September 12th, 2012 AT 2:15 PM

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