Camshaft position sensor location

Tiny
RICKYB63
  • MEMBER
  • 1996 FORD TAURUS
Is the camshaft position sensor hard to change and where is it located?
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Friday, May 30th, 2008 AT 1:54 AM

13 Replies

Tiny
MHPAUTOS
  • EXPERT
Here are instructions on how to change the camshaft angle sensor which is where the distributor used to be. (Below)

Check out the diagrams (below). Please let us know if you need anything else to get the problem fixed.

Cheers
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Friday, May 30th, 2008 AT 4:37 AM
Tiny
BRIAN DUNLAP
  • MEMBER
  • 1997 FORD TAURUS
  • 6 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 200,000 MILES
Car idled rough check engine light came on had computer checked. Code said a faulty cam shaft sensor. Would like to know where it is located and do I have to do anything else beside disconnect the battery and replace sensor?
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Wednesday, August 1st, 2018 AT 7:36 PM (Merged)
Tiny
BLUELIGHTNIN6
  • EXPERT
Hello and thanks for donating!

The camshaft position (CMP) sensor is located either on left side of engine block, between cylinder heads or right top of engine cylinder head, below valve cover (depends on engine). If the eighth digit in your VIN is anything other than "S", you will have to perform a CMP sensor syncrhonizer procedure. If the eighth digit of your VIN is "S" then simply disconnect and replace the sensor. If you need the synchronizer steps let me know.
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Wednesday, August 1st, 2018 AT 7:36 PM (Merged)
Tiny
DBAKER806
  • MEMBER
  • 1996 FORD TAURUS
  • 6 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 86,000 MILES
I need to know how to install this synchronizer. I cannot mark the old one because it came apart inside. It seems to me that the cam position sensor needs to be timed with number one piston at TDC. Is this correct?
I do not have the Ford tool T95T-12200-A, so I would like to learn another procedure.
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Wednesday, August 1st, 2018 AT 7:36 PM (Merged)
Tiny
SCOTTY DEE
  • MEMBER
Hey dbaker806! You are right, the cam sensor must be timed with number one up. You can buy the tool from a local parts store most generally, OTC, etc. However, the tools are application specific.

The problem you might incur is verifying it is lined up correctly, using a graphing meter to watch the waveform power balance test with cylinder one injector unplugged, and monitor for activity on any other cylinder. If there is activity on another cylinder while the number one injector is unplugged, than it is installed wrong.

Other than that, it is trial and error.
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Wednesday, August 1st, 2018 AT 7:36 PM (Merged)
Tiny
TODD SWICK
  • MEMBER
  • 1996 FORD TAURUS
Six cylinder.

I am replacing a camshaft sensor housing. If my number one cylinder is TDC what position would the inner sensor flange be in? (The metal piece that passes through the sensor magnet)
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Wednesday, August 1st, 2018 AT 7:36 PM (Merged)
Tiny
JACK42
  • MEMBER
If I remember correctly it should be lined up with the gap in the housing where the actual sensor goes. In other words it should be in the center of the sensor itself on number one.
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Wednesday, August 1st, 2018 AT 7:36 PM (Merged)
Tiny
STRYDER95
  • MEMBER
  • 1997 FORD TAURUS
Six cylinder two wheel drive automatic.

Where is the cam position sensor on the car listed above 3.0 V6?
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Wednesday, August 1st, 2018 AT 7:36 PM (Merged)
Tiny
JUSTDON
  • MEMBER
While standing in front of the car, it is on the right side of the lower intake man, right on top of the block. It is where the distributor would be.
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Wednesday, August 1st, 2018 AT 7:36 PM (Merged)
Tiny
WIETHE
  • MEMBER
  • 1997 FORD TAURUS
How do I replace the car listed above GL model camshaft sensor? What tools do I need and what is the cost?
Thanks
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Wednesday, August 1st, 2018 AT 7:36 PM (Merged)
Tiny
4 TAURUS FAMILY
  • MEMBER
I hope you have gotten an answer by now, two months later. Anyway, my 1997 Taurus with 3.0L single cam, sheared the syncronizer pin that drives the sensor and oil pump. Replacing the sensor was part of the process.

First, locate the timing mark just behind the crank pulley. It is a pointed piece protruding from the block just car-forward of the crank sensor which sits above the crank pulley. If practical, loosen the spark plugs so the engine can be positioned easier with a socket and flex handle. You must put the TDC mark on the crank on the timing mark at the top of the compression stroke. To do this, bump the starter while holding your finger over the number one plug hole to feel compression, or insert a piece of rubber hose in the plug hole with a balloon on the other end and watch for it to inflate. This will be the beginning of the compression stroke. Stop when TDC mark is just short of timing mark.

Put a 21mm socket and flex handle on the crank nut to position TDC mark on the timing mark. Do not crank or bump starter or you start over. Disconnect the negative terminal from battery. Remove the sensor connectors on the throttle and intake tubes. Undo the air intake hose, PCV, and throttle assembly (leave throttle and cruise cables attached - it will swing out of the way nicely) Next, remove the wire protector just above the cam sensor and tie them back out of the way. Before you remove the sensor, you must have a sensor positioning tool (an over priced $50.00 plastic part available on internet or at some parts stores) which aligns the syncro and sensor to the camshaft.

Make a mark on the sensor housing and intake manifold so that you can align it after replacing the sensor. Remove the sensor connector, and the two sensor bolts with a 5.5mm socket and lift it straight up. You will probably find the small magnet that fell out of the sensor. Unless the syncro needs replacing, leave it as is. Using the alignment tool, rotate the housing and the sensor vane until the tool fits flat on top of the housing, and point the arrow toward the housing washer and clamp nut. Attach a new sensor - hopefully with one whose magnet is completely enclosed. Re-assemble in reverse order. Check timing with a timing light, referring to shop manual for correct setting.

Shop manual says that whenever the battery is disconnected, the car may have to be driven as much as ten miles for the computer to learn its timing strategy again.
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Wednesday, August 1st, 2018 AT 7:36 PM (Merged)
Tiny
NOMECHANIC28
  • MEMBER
  • 1999 FORD TAURUS
Six cylinder two wheel drive automatic.

Where exactly is the part located and how do I replace it? Do I need to take it to a mechanic or can I replace on my own?
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Wednesday, August 1st, 2018 AT 7:36 PM (Merged)
Tiny
BMRFIXIT
  • EXPERT
It is in the rear of engine in between the two cylinders.
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Wednesday, August 1st, 2018 AT 7:36 PM (Merged)

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