1990 Ford F-150 grinding when tryin to get back into a gear

Tiny
KRIFFORD
  • MEMBER
  • 1990 FORD F-150
  • V8
  • 4WD
  • MANUAL
  • 118,875 MILES
No noises whatsoever while gettin up to 4th or overdrive, but when I brake or go round a corner and try to get back into the right gear, any gear, it grinds at me. Clutch doesn't slip or try to move the truck when standing still.
I already replaced the transmission with one out of a donor f 250 my stepdad had layin around. Same situation. Could it be the transfer case? Clutch? Gotta be somethin outside trans right? Improperly bled slave or master cylinder?
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Friday, October 30th, 2009 AT 11:15 PM

3 Replies

Tiny
MATHIASO
  • MEMBER
Noises are more complicated to diagnose.
Take your truck to an empty parking lot.
Drive in full circle( steering turned to full stop) to your right, suddently brake
drive in full circle to you left, and suddent brake
any noise?
Drive straigh and brake suddently
any noise?
Drive straight, change in all gears, any noise
notice for wich gear, you hear the noise. Or the noise in all gear?
Come back to me with what you find.

What do you mean by" clutch doesn't move the truck when standing still. "?
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Saturday, October 31st, 2009 AT 5:11 PM
Tiny
KRIFFORD
  • MEMBER
My truck was makin grumbly noises in 1st and 2nd. Upon inspection I found it had been leaking fluid from the concentric slave cylinder. After changing it out and bleeding the clutch, the grumbling stopped, but I started noticing that the truck didn't want to go into 3rd without grinding. I thought maybe the slave might not have been the only problem after all. But had no idea what to do about it. I drove it the way it was and it got steadily worse. By worse I mean that it started grinding whenever I tried to shift into a lower gear and it would also grind if I was traveling down hill and didn't take it out of gear. If I revved the motor the downhill grinding would stop.
Eventually the tranny gave up the ghost and just wouldn't back out of the driveway. I swapped it out with one out of my stepdads 88 f-250 which we know for a fact worked perfectly. Now that it's all swapped out and ready for the road, it's back to doin the grinding thing when I try to shift into a lower gear. Which obviously leads me to believe that it isn't the tranny, but something causing the tranny to grind.
Brake noise? Your kidding right? You just misunderstood my post?
I'm thinking misadjusted clutch pedal or faulty clutch master. But you're the experts. By "clutch doesn't move the truck when standing still" I mean that when I'm at a dead stop with the truck in gear and the clutch depressed, the clutch isn't slipping (enough?) To move the truck whatsoever.
It's been parked for a good while now and I need to get it going pretty soon cuz of the snow and hills and all.
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Wednesday, November 25th, 2009 AT 3:18 AM
Tiny
MATHIASO
  • MEMBER
Happy thanksgiving and thanks for reminding me the misunderstanding.
You will need to check the whole cluch assembly,
The clutch assembly consists of the flywheel, the clutch disc, the clutch pressure plate, the throwout bearing/clutch release bearing and fork, the hydraulic system and the pedal.
The hydraulic susyem was leaking, but you fixed that.
But sometime, one problem lead to another.
I suspect the trouwout bearing'
it transmits the movement of the clutch linkage and release fork to the pressure plate. It outer race depresses the pressure plate fingers or trust ring and rotate with the pressure plate when the the clutch pedal is depressed. This action causes the pressure plate to release it clamping force on the clutch disc. The inner race of the release bearing is pressed into a collar, wich slides back and forth over the transmission's front bearing retainer.

The clutch release bearing should be checked by turning the bearing while applying force in the direction of rotation.
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Wednesday, November 25th, 2009 AT 7:33 PM

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