Transmission fluid

Tiny
JEFFREY7707
  • MEMBER
  • 1994 FORD EXPLORER
  • 6 CYL
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 230,000 MILES
How much transmission fluid goes in?
Do you
have the same problem?
Yes
No
Monday, June 22nd, 2009 AT 11:12 PM

28 Replies

Tiny
JGAROFALO
  • MEMBER
The total capacity of the transmission is twelve quarts. How much you need to add depends on how much is already in the unit. Your best guide is the indicator on the dipstick. Level should be between the "add" and "full" marks on the stick with the engine idling in park and transmission warmed up to operating temperature.

Here is a guide to help you see how to do the job:

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/how-to-service-an-automatic-transmission

Please let us know if you need anything else to get the problem fixed.

Cheers
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Wednesday, June 24th, 2009 AT 12:38 PM
Tiny
CRIT21
  • MEMBER
  • 1994 FORD EXPLORER
  • 6 CYL
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 16,000 MILES
I recently replaced the vacuum modulator on the trans because it was sucking transmission fluid into the vacuum line. Transmission fluid is all-new Mercron III and is full. Two days after replacing the modulator the transmission suddenly would not shift into the higher gears unless I took my foot off the gas. Once in a higher gear, it would downshift as soon as I hit the gas again. The check engine light did not come on. I replaced the modulator again, but the problem remained.
What should I check next?
Is there an OBD code for this?
Could it be a problem with the solenoids?
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Thursday, August 2nd, 2018 AT 7:14 PM (Merged)
Tiny
ANTHONYNOBLE83
  • MEMBER
Your modulator needs adjusted. Pull the vacuum line and you actually stick a small allen wrench in there and adjust it. In to make it hang on longer, and let it out to shift sooner. Just turn it one turn at a time though.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Thursday, August 2nd, 2018 AT 7:14 PM (Merged)
Tiny
HILLBILLY2
  • MEMBER
  • 1994 FORD EXPLORER
Six cylinder four wheel drive automatic.

I have a transmission leak between the extension and the transfer case and I was wondering if there is suppose to be transmission fluid in the extension. If not I was wondering where it could becoming from?
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Thursday, August 2nd, 2018 AT 7:14 PM (Merged)
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Are you referring to where the transmission and transfer case bolt together? If so, check something for me. Remove the fill/check bolt (not the drain) on the transfer case to see if ATF comes running out.

Let me know what you find.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Thursday, August 2nd, 2018 AT 7:14 PM (Merged)
Tiny
HILLBILLY2
  • MEMBER
Yes, where the transfer case bolts to the extension that is between the transfer-case and transmission. Is there suppose to be transmission fluid in that area? That is my question, because I need to know if its the seal on the transfer case or the transmission that needs to be replaced?
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Thursday, August 2nd, 2018 AT 7:14 PM (Merged)
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
It is on the transmission.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Thursday, August 2nd, 2018 AT 7:14 PM (Merged)
Tiny
HILLBILLY2
  • MEMBER
I already have removed the transfer-case and fluid is slowly dripping out of the extension. So it would it be a seal on the back end of the transmission then?
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Thursday, August 2nd, 2018 AT 7:14 PM (Merged)
Tiny
ROBINPUR
  • MEMBER
  • 1994 FORD EXPLORER
Four wheel drive automatic,

We bought this SUV in August. A couple of weeks after, we noticed that it was leaking transmission fluid. We kept an eye on the fluid, however, this past weekend while on our way to a wedding, the truck started leaked very badly, there was smoke, and the transmission started to slip.

We pulled over, and the fluid continued to drain.

We had the truck towed back to our home, and the next day the fluids was refilled. We checked for leaks, and there were no leaks visible at all.
We took the truck for a test drive around the block several times, and still no leaks.
The truck was driven to my work place and, again, there was no leakage.

Can you explain what is happening?

Thanks
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Thursday, August 2nd, 2018 AT 7:14 PM (Merged)
Tiny
JACK42
  • MEMBER
Sounds as thought the transmission may be getting hot and blowing the fluid out of the vent tube. If there is an internal problem, it could get overheated on longer drives, then the fluid is pushed out of the vent tube.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Thursday, August 2nd, 2018 AT 7:14 PM (Merged)
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Yes. It should be right at the end of the transmission's tail housing.

Let me know if you have other questions.

Joe
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Thursday, August 2nd, 2018 AT 7:14 PM (Merged)
Tiny
2CARPROS-ARCHIVES
  • MEMBER
  • 1994 FORD EXPLORER
  • 145,000 MILES
When I put my car in drive it just drifts backwards. Eventually I
can get it in drive but it takes a couple tries. Does it need transmission fluid? Or I am afraid to ask, a new transmission?
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Thursday, August 2nd, 2018 AT 7:14 PM (Merged)
Tiny
ASEMASTER6371
  • EXPERT
Check the fluid first. Beyond that, yes you may need a transmission.

Roy
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Thursday, August 2nd, 2018 AT 7:14 PM (Merged)
Tiny
JAKE1983
  • MEMBER
  • 1994 FORD EXPLORER
  • 4.0L
  • 6 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 156,820 MILES
There is transmission fluid in the intake manifold and it is smoking like crazy. What is it and can it be fixed?
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Thursday, August 2nd, 2018 AT 7:14 PM (Merged)
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Yes it can. Suspect a leaking vacuum modulator. It has a vacuum hose hooked to it, and the transmission fluid is getting sucked into it, then into the intake manifold. The vacuum changes according to load on the engine so it is used, along with road speed, to tell the transmission when to shift. When the unit is leaking, little vacuum can build up in that line, and low vacuum is what you get when you push hard on the accelerator to take off fast, pull a trailer, or go up a hill. Those conditions make the transmission wait longer to up-shift, and it is the vacuum modulator that is responsible for telling the transmission what the engine load is. Yours is incorrectly telling the transmission you are under hard acceleration. That is why it will not up-shift.

GM used a vacuum modulator on all of their vehicles for decades. Chrysler never used one. They used a simple mechanical linkage hooked to the throttle. Ford used half of each system, depending on year, model, and which transmission was used.

Rather than trying to describe what it looks like, buy a new one from any auto parts store, then look for that part near the rear of the transmission. A single bolt holds a forked metal bracket. Remove that, then the modulator pulls straight out.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Thursday, August 2nd, 2018 AT 7:14 PM (Merged)
Tiny
ROCKIN RICK BROWN
  • MEMBER
  • 1994 FORD EXPLORER
  • 6 CYL
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 180,000 MILES
I checked the fluid in my SUV's transmission and it is not red but sort of brown. I know this is not a good sign. My question is, if I drain the fluid and replace it will that keep me going for a while or will the transmission fail soon anyway? A transmission rebuild is out of my budget (no job). So if you think that it will fail soon (it shifts fine right now) I will just sell it to some one who can afford to have it serviced.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Thursday, August 2nd, 2018 AT 7:14 PM (Merged)
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Just replace the fluid and filter. Most commonly if there is not a noticeable problem now there will not be in the near future either. Half of the vehicles we do fluid and filter changes on have dark fluid. It is when the fluid smells burned that you have to worry. If you really want to be thorough, have the system flushed but that is a lot more expensive. Those flush systems really came about because of the finicky nature of the newer computer-controlled transmissions that are made as cheaply as possible. They need every ounce of help they can get.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Thursday, August 2nd, 2018 AT 7:14 PM (Merged)
Tiny
FLIPS MOTOR SPORTS
  • MEMBER
  • 1994 FORD EXPLORER
  • 150,000 MILES
Automatic transmission is pumping fluid out of transmission after running a while.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Thursday, August 2nd, 2018 AT 7:14 PM (Merged)
Tiny
ASEMASTER6371
  • EXPERT
Where is it coming from?

It could be one of several places but we need more information.

Roy
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Thursday, August 2nd, 2018 AT 7:14 PM (Merged)
Tiny
HAMMER_MECHANIC
  • MEMBER
  • 1992 FORD EXPLORER
  • 6 CYL
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 130,000 MILES
Transmission fluid is getting into the oil. Sounds crazy and no one seems to believe me but the transmission fluid level drops and the oil level rises. Oil smells like transmission fluid and changes color. Where can the transmission fluid get into the oil?
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Thursday, August 2nd, 2018 AT 7:14 PM (Merged)

Please login or register to post a reply.

Recommended Guides