Fabricating an exhaust

Tiny
FORENSICS
  • MEMBER
  • 1993 DODGE DAKOTA
  • 3.9L
  • V6
  • 4WD
  • MANUAL
  • 198,000 MILES
So for the past two years this has been my project truck and I've done everything myself to get it going. But when I did the clutch I had to do some exhaust cutting so all that's left is the Y pipe that goes from the manifolds down to the O2 sensor. I have never once welded in my life but I'd like to do the exhaust myself. I only have about $220.00 saved up and I'd like to do the exhaust on a budget and learn some welding while I'm at it. I'm thinking about doing the exhaust short and simple having it come out before the back tires and possibly up and over the frame, but for me it's easier said than done and I'd like some professional advice in how I should get the job done. Oh, and I've been looking at mufflers and I cannot really tell what kind I should get but my only preference is if it can give an idle that people cannot hear from inside their house I don't really feel like being the one really loud guy that starts his car in the morning though it would be nice if it had a deep grumble.
If more pictures are needed I can upload more.
Thanks for any advice.
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Saturday, December 22nd, 2018 AT 2:40 PM

3 Replies

Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Hi and thanks for using 2CarPros.

I see it's apart right before the catalytic converter. Federal law requires a converter to be installed. With that in mind, I don't know the state you are from, so be careful with where the exhaust exits. Make sure what the state requires.

Next, as far as fabrication, when it is done, shops have a pipe bender to customize things to what they need. Also, there really isn't enough room to take the exhaust over the frame. It will hit and create a ton of heat under the bed, so I don't recommend that.

Now, as far as welding, the best thing to do is get some scrap metal and give it a try. The exhaust will need welded in a manner that requires there are no pin holes in the weld. For the muffler options, I really recommend you ask the local parts store. There are so many aftermarket ones available. Plus, you want it quiet in the vehicle and you didn't mention other than that. If you want to hear it when driving (other than an idle) that is going to require a specific type of muffler.

I hope this helps. Let me know if you have other questions.

Joe
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Saturday, December 22nd, 2018 AT 6:37 PM
Tiny
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So I've been looking at welders to buy and I can't tell what kind I should get. As far as I've seen is there's ones that feed the wire through the gun and then there's ones that weld using sticks of the welding stuff. I'm not really looking for anything really big and fancy just something that can get the weld done and holds the pipes together well.
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Tuesday, December 25th, 2018 AT 9:50 AM
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
The wire feed ones are called mig welders. That is what you want for this type of job. Now, keep in mind that the really cheap ones will require a wire with a flux core. The better ones will be use in conjunction with argon gas but can also be used with a flux core without the gas. The exact difference between the two seems to be related to what is being welded and where. For example, a solid core is more desirable in outdoor conditions. When welding with a gas insulator such as argon, it can be blown away by wind or weather conditions and have an adverse affect on the overall job. I have used a solid core wire to weld exhaust with no trouble, but I recommend you do some research on the two prior to the purchase of a mig welder. I know companies such as Miller will have a description of each offering the pros and cons of both.

I really wouldn't suggest a stick welder unless you plan to be doing some HD work. I haven't even see one in a long time.
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Tuesday, December 25th, 2018 AT 6:54 PM

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