Driver side window

Tiny
BOBKHAWKINS
  • MEMBER
  • 2001 GMC SIERRA
  • 5.7L
  • V8
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 160,000 MILES
The window will not work using door switch. I have verified that the motor works and it has a new switch. When I tested the 25 amp circuit breaker it was good, but when I tested the ground side of the circuit I do not get any voltage. I tested other grounds on the box and they all showed voltage. I tried to jump the window ground to another ground but that only caused the other ground to not work. Would like some guidance.
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Saturday, August 13th, 2016 AT 3:42 PM

7 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
I am not following your tests. If you are using your voltmeter correctly, you should not have any voltage on ground wires. They are supposed to be at "'ground", meaning 0 volts.

What I would start with is going right to the window motor's connector. Unplug it, then measure the resistance from each wire to ground. Ground your ohm meter somewhere on the body or right to the battery, not on the door. Both wires should read very low resistance, unless you have GM's famous design with relays built into the switch. For that I will have to dig up a wiring diagram to be sure I am telling you the right things.

If both wires read good continuity to ground, switch to reading voltage, then measure each wire while activating the switch. Only one should get 12 volts in the "up" direction, and the other one should get 12 volts in the "down" direction. If they do, plug the connector into the motor, then measure both wires again.

If you find 12 volts on both wires when the switch is activated, there is a break in the ground circuit that got overlooked and we will have to pursue that.
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Saturday, August 13th, 2016 AT 11:17 PM
Tiny
BOBKHAWKINS
  • MEMBER
I tested the voltage at the positive and neg terminals where the 25 amp circuit breaker plugs into the fuse box. It showed no voltage, so I used another fuse plug in positive and negative and it read 12 volts. Then I tested voltage between the positive side where 25 amp cb goes and got 12 volts: then I tested the voltage from the positive good fuse terminal to the negative side of the 25 amp cb and got 0 volts. I think this all means I have a bad neg terminal where the 25 amp window circuit breaker plugs into the fuse box, but I do not know what to do to fix it. Thanks for the help.
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Sunday, August 14th, 2016 AT 10:50 AM
Tiny
BOBKHAWKINS
  • MEMBER
Fixed, broken wires.
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Sunday, August 14th, 2016 AT 10:40 PM
Tiny
KEN
  • ADMIN
Nice find, thanks for getting back to us, please use 2Carpros anytime, we are here to help

Best, Ken
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Monday, August 15th, 2016 AT 2:50 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
I'm still confused. It sounds like you're calling the two terminals of the circuit breaker the positive and negative sides. If that is correct, you must have 12 volts on both of them. If voltage is missing on one terminal, the circuit breaker is bad or it's tripped and will reset automatically within a minute.

Where was the broken wire? That commonly occurs between the door hinges but it won't affect just the driver's window.
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Monday, August 15th, 2016 AT 10:05 PM
Tiny
BOBKHAWKINS
  • MEMBER
Green wire at hinge + 2 orange, 1 grey, 1 brown which also fixed driver lock.
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Tuesday, August 16th, 2016 AT 12:49 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Dandy. Wish I would have known that before you started so I could share my wondrous experience.

When I do these, I pull the harness out of the door and out of the "A pillar and cut each wire, one at a time, in the areas where no flexing ever occurred. If I'm cutting out an 11" section, I splice in a 22" piece of wire. Every splice gets soldered, then sealed with heat-shrink tubing. Never use electrical tape because it will unravel into a gooey mess on a hot day. And don't even think of cobbling these with butt connectors. Those will cause all kinds of intermittent problems.

Wrap the harness with the same plastic wrap used originally. You can get it at any auto parts store. It looks like electrical tape, but it's not sticky. Shove the rubber grommets back so you can run the wrap up that far, then bring those grommets back to hold the wrap in place. Stuff half of the harness into the "A" pillar, but watch that it doesn't rub on the parking brake pedal mechanism. The next time this happens, pull that part out and you're half done.
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Tuesday, August 16th, 2016 AT 3:42 AM

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