Distributor problems

Tiny
SMITH95
  • MEMBER
  • 1998 HONDA ACCORD
  • 2.3L
  • 4 CYL
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 214,000 MILES
I had this car for a little over a year. Since I have had it, I replaced my distributor twice. The diagnostics explained it is an error code of p1382. The definition is the engine cranking or running the PCM did not detect signals from camshaft position (cylinder position) sensor one during the "comprehensive component monitor" self-test. Again, I replaced the distributor twice! So, I believe it is something connecting to the part or it is the type of distributors I am purchasing. The first time I replaced it I got it from an AM Auto parts website. The second time, I got it from a pull-apart yard. So, I am not what to do anymore about it. My car is still quitting and I am all out of ideas and money! Can anyone help me?
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Tuesday, January 3rd, 2017 AT 2:45 PM

3 Replies

Tiny
STEVE W.
  • EXPERT
Does it quit at random or is it something like, It quits when I hit a bump while turning right?
Do you still have the original distributor? And do you have a multimeter? (Or even better a scope)

From the description I am going to say you have either a wiring issue or the ECU is failing. Not likely that three different distributors all are failed the same way.

First we will test the wiring and the sensor. Disconnect the negative battery lead.

The two signal wires for the CPS are yellow (shielded wire) and black. They both run from the distributor to the ECU (connector pins C29 and C30) Use the multimeter set to ohms. Disconnect the distributor connector, check the ohms reading on those two wires. It should fall between 500 and 1000 ohms. Outside of that you have a problem in the sensor. Also check for continuity between both wires and the distributor housing. Should not be any.

Next plug the distributor back in and unplug connector C ( 31 pin connector) Now locate the two wires in that connector. They will be next to each other in the same row. Connect the meter there. You should see almost the same ohms reading there as you did at the other end. No reading or much higher and you need to trace the wires back to find damage or bad wiring. If the reading is the same (or very close) it is likely the ECU itself that is bad.
No real way to test it without a good scan tool to actually see the signal.
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Tuesday, January 3rd, 2017 AT 7:13 PM
Tiny
SMITH95
  • MEMBER
Steve 'W,
I am not sure where is my first distributor, but I still have the second one, and no I do not have a multimeter. Can I do all this by myself or do I need someone to do it for me?
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Thursday, January 5th, 2017 AT 1:50 PM
Tiny
STEVE W.
  • EXPERT
Well you could DIY if you bought a multimeter, even a cheap one would do the job and they come in handy for other tests on a car as well. Or you could have a shop do it, but that will cost you more money. Your choice. Here is a short section on their usage.
https://www.2carpros.com/articles/how-to-use-a-voltmeter
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Thursday, January 5th, 2017 AT 6:51 PM

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