Cranks but will not start

Tiny
STEPHANIE ANN MILLS
  • MEMBER
  • 2005 CHRYSLER SEBRING
  • 2.4L
  • 4 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 130,677 MILES
It happened on the way home from an oil change/inspection. I came to a complete stop to make a turn and it just shut off and would not start up again. It is still cranking but not starting. I changed the camshaft sensor and the spark plugs (getting a spark) but it is still not starting. It seems to be getting gas just fine. The fuel pump is kicking on. We checked the fuses and they are working.
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Saturday, April 22nd, 2017 AT 3:28 PM

9 Replies

Tiny
JOHNNY G.JR
  • MEMBER
First step is to check OBD for codes.
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Saturday, April 22nd, 2017 AT 5:37 PM
Tiny
STEPHANIE ANN MILLS
  • MEMBER
Code PO340 for camshaft sensor but we changed that and still not starting.
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Saturday, April 22nd, 2017 AT 5:38 PM
Tiny
STEPHANIE ANN MILLS
  • MEMBER
After that was changed it is not throwing any more codes.
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Saturday, April 22nd, 2017 AT 5:39 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
First comment of value, the fault code did not say the cam sensor was bad. It only means that is the circuit that needs to be checked. A bad sensor will cause that code only about half of the time. Also, if you are getting spark on all the cylinders, the cam sensor is working

A very common cause of stalling popped into my head when I read "inspection". Usually that means a quick visual inspection of exhaust and steering parts, but if it was more in-depth, and involved disconnecting the battery, the result will be stalling at stop signs, and hard starting, unless the accelerator pedal is held down 1/4". Disconnecting the battery causes the Engine Computer to lose its memory including "minimum throttle". Idle speed will be too low until that is relearned.

If the engine restarts when you hold the accelerator pedal down 1/4", to meet the conditions for the relearn to take place, drive at highway speed with the engine warmed up, then coast for at least seven seconds without touching the pedals.
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Saturday, April 22nd, 2017 AT 11:21 PM
Tiny
STEPHANIE ANN MILLS
  • MEMBER
Thank you for getting back to me, we tried what you suggested (1/4 accelerator pushed while starting), and it still would not start.

We do not know too much about cars. It was not until after we got the cam sensor, and replaced it, that Google informed me the cam sensor may not be bad. At that point I do not think they will take the part back. Then we noticed we were getting a spark but the spark plugs were worn down (if that makes sense). So we replaced those, but they needed it regardless.

I am going to call for a tow to the garage tomorrow, because we just cannot figure it out.
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Sunday, April 23rd, 2017 AT 6:37 AM
Tiny
STEPHANIE ANN MILLS
  • MEMBER
It appears to be out of time (the marks do not match). Do not know what else is going on, but I am getting it towed tomorrow. I will update with the findings in the hopes it may help someone else with a similar problem.
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Sunday, April 23rd, 2017 AT 1:39 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
The timing belt was supposed to be replaced at a maximum of 100,000 miles. It's specified as soon as 75,000 for some engines. There's two versions of your engine, and both are "interference" engines. That means if the timing belt broke, there are going to be bent valves. On Chrysler products, the Engine Computer will shut the engine down to protect the valves if the belt jumps two teeth. It takes three teeth for the valves to hit the pistons and be bent. At one tooth off, you would have seen the Check Engine light turn on, and the diagnostic fault code would have been, "Cam and crank sync".
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Monday, April 24th, 2017 AT 6:41 PM
Tiny
STEPHANIE ANN MILLS
  • MEMBER
Mine is 118,000 miles, I did not know that.

The garage called me today and said they can fix the belt for $650 but if the valves are bent after they change it they will have to pull it all out again and fix that -assuming they can, but they did not give me a price for bent valve scenario. I imagine it's going to be a good bit, probably more then the car is worth I'm sure.

Thank you for your help, I really appreciate it!
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Monday, April 24th, 2017 AT 7:31 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
The first half of the job involves taking a lot of stuff apart and removing the old belt. First of all, if the belt is not broken, the valves likely were saved by the Engine Computer shutting the engine off before that damage could occur. If the belt IS broken, the second half of the job is reassembly, and that starts with installing the new belt. At that point, before any more reassembly is done, your mechanic can perform a cylinder leakage test on one or all of the cylinders. The tester simply shows the percentage of leakage when compressed air is forced into the spark plug hole, but by listening at four places, we can tell WHY that leakage is occurring. For bent valves, you'll hear a hiss at the tail pipe if the exhaust valve is bent, and a hiss at the throttle body if an intake valve is bent.

Knowing those test results can give the mechanic the confidence to continue with the reassembly or to know he is recommending valve service that is really needed.

If you are willing to invest more time than dollars in valve repair, you might consider looking for a nearby community college with an Automotive program, and let students do the work. If you have an interest in knowing more about how that works, let me know, and Ill describe how we did that in my program.
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Monday, April 24th, 2017 AT 7:56 PM

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