1999 Chevy Cavalier Caliper Pad Bolt

Tiny
AVICSINT@HOTMAIL.COM
  • MEMBER
  • 1999 CHEVROLET CAVALIER
Brakes problem
1999 Chevy Cavalier 4 cyl Front Wheel Drive Automatic

I am changing the front breaks on my 1999 Chevy Cavalier I need to know what type of tool is needed to remove the bolts and what size it is. These are not ordinary hex bolts but it looks like there is some sort of star or hex type insert to remove bolts can you help me.
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Friday, March 5th, 2010 AT 9:59 AM

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Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Can't help you with the size, although T40 is common on smaller cars, and T50 was used a lot. These are called torx heads and have been common for a long time, back to the mid 1980s.

Rather than trying to find the one size, just buy a complete set. They are only a few bucks for a set of six to eight sizes. The bit you use must fit snuggly to prevent rounding out the hole.

Caradiodoc
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Friday, March 5th, 2010 AT 10:20 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
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Also, are you aware of the multitude of things you can do or not do to cause braking related problems?

The rotors must be machined so the braking surfaces will match the new pads. If they are under the legal limit for thickness, the machine shop will not cut them for you. It's a liability thing. If you cut corners by not having them machined, look for built up rust spots on the back side that correspond to the holes in the flange of the hub assembly. If you don't clean that rust off, the high spots will cause the rotor and wheel to wobble and eventually come loose.

Use high-temperature brake grease on the hub-to-rotor contact point, the pad-to-caliper contact points, and any sliding caliper mounting points.

Do not get any greasy fingerprints on the linings or rotors. If there is any grease on the friction surfaces, wash it off with brake parts cleaner before they get hot from normal braking.

Of real big importance, do not get the slightest bit of petroleum product in the brake fluid. Simply using an oily, wiped off finger to push the bladder seal back into the cap on the master cylinder can contaminate the fluid. When problems develop, the only proper fix is to replace ALL rubber parts including any valve with rubber o-rings or seals. That is a very expensive mistake, especially if you have an anti-lock brake hydraulic controller.

My reason for mentioning these things is I've been reading a lot of posts here from people who aren't aware of all the things professionals do to deliver a quality brake job.

Caradiodoc
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Friday, March 5th, 2010 AT 10:35 AM

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