1998 Chevy Blazer vibration

Tiny
JKDK
  • MEMBER
  • 1998 CHEVROLET BLAZER
  • 6 CYL
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 13,000 MILES
Blazer has new Michlen tires, has new front shocks, has new universal joints. During a left hand bend in the road the blazer has a ting ting ting sound that is faint and sounds like it is coming from the middle or back of the vehicle. In addtion, it has a vibration that you feel after the vehicle is going above 64 mph. The vibration is not in the steering column but rather the rest of the vehicle.
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Tuesday, October 6th, 2009 AT 7:40 PM

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Tiny
BMRFIXIT
  • EXPERT
The front axle may have excessive preload in the pinion or carrier bearings or may be locked up not allowing the pinion to rotate freely. Vehicles with a NVG 236 or 246 transfer case (RPO NP8) have a preload in the clutch pack of the transfer case that supplies torque to the front driveshaft at all times. The front and rear driveshafts should be rotating at approximately the same speed (the front driveshaft display on the Tech 2(R) may be slightly higher but never less than the rear).
DIAGNOSTIC TIPS
Position the vehicle on the hoist and raise the hoist until all four wheels are off the ground.
Connect the Tech 2(R) to the vehicle.
Start the engine.
Select the following screens on the Tech 2(R):
F0; Diagnostics
Vehicle model year
LD truck; MPV; Incomplete
F0; Powertrain
Vehicle engine
4-speed automatic
2 speed Active
F1; Data Display
F2; ATC Data Display
F0; Transfer Case Data
Select 2 HI with the transfer case selector switch.
Apply the service brake and move the transmission selector lever in any forward gear.
Release the service brake.
Observe the front and rear propeller shaft speeds displayed on the Tech 2(R). The front and rear driveshafts should be rotating at approximately the same speed (the front driveshaft display on the Tech 2(R) may be slightly higher but never less than the rear). If they are not, skip to the Correction section below. If the driveshaft speeds are approximately the same, diagnose for other conditions that may be causing the concern. If the vehicle is stationary, the front propeller shaft should not rotate freely. It may take up to 54 N.M (40 lb ft) of torque to turn the front output shaft of the transfer case. If the front axle for any reason does not allow the front propeller shaft to spin while in the 2WD setting, the clutch pack in the transfer case will overheat because of the speed difference (slip) across the clutch pack between the stationary front driveshaft and the rotating rear driveshaft.
CORRECTION
For vehicles with the NP8 transfer case option (Autotrak with push-button selections for 2HI. Auto 4WD, 4HI, 4LO and Neutral) only, when a vehicle comes in for issues with the front axle, the transfer case should also be inspected for overheating by inspecting for burned fluid or a free rotating front driveshaft. In addition to correcting front axle concerns, necessary repairs should be made to the transfer case.
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Wednesday, October 7th, 2009 AT 5:59 AM

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