Car loud like an airplane when driving, slowing down and stopping

Tiny
MYA PHILLIPS-DAVIS
  • MEMBER
  • 2002 OLDSMOBILE ALERO
  • 4 CYL
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 161,812 MILES
Had the car ten months now with no issues at all and I have put brand new tires on the car in July 2016 when I bought it and I get the oil changed every three months. About two weeks ago I got my oil changed at Walmart and now my car is very loud when I accelerate and decelerate. Best I can describe the sound is its like a jet or airplane. Car starts and drives fine no shaking or jerking it is just really loud. When I take off it is almost as if my car sounds like it is stuck in a gear and it is trying to get out of it but my car is an automatic not standard shift. Can you tell me what is wrong (exhaust, wheel bearing, transmission, or what)?
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Friday, May 5th, 2017 AT 4:11 PM

6 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
The proper thing to have done was to go back right away and explain the new problem. After this long, there is no way to convince the people at the shop that the problem started there. Even if the problem did not show up right away, at least they will listen and look to see if it could be related to their work. They deserve the chance to correct their mistake.

If you can make the noise occur while the car is standing still, it is not a wheel bearing issue. An exhaust leak can get pretty loud, and there is always a flexible joint on front-wheel-drive cars to allow the engine to rock back and forth freely. That joint could open up just enough to be heard, and that would change between accelerating, cruising, and coasting.

If the transmission is not up-shifting properly, the engine will be running much too fast, and you will hear the excessive engine noise inside the car. The mechanic could have inadvertently bumped an electrical connector, or something like that. Forcing the car to run at highway speeds in the wrong gear will lead to serious engine damage.

The place to start is by having someone drive the car to identify the actual cause of the noise, then we can discuss the solutions.
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Friday, May 5th, 2017 AT 5:46 PM
Tiny
MYA PHILLIPS-DAVIS
  • MEMBER
Thanks for the reply! I actually took my car straight back to Walmart that day after the oil change and spoke with the manager in T and L about how loud my car was and he had someone go back and check my car. Of course I was told "There's nothing unusual due to the oil change we did so you may want to have a mechanic look at it". After arguing with the guy that my car was fine before they touched I was then told that there is nothing more they can do other than tell me they did nothing wrong. I have not been driving the car because I am not sure what is causing the loudness and I am a female and would hate to try and drive to a shop in the city (I live in the country forty miles outside the city) and I do not want to be stranded with my three year old son in the car or cause further damage to what is going on with it. Thanks for your help and I will have to get my dad to come out and work on it or have it towed in. Thanks again
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Friday, May 5th, 2017 AT 6:51 PM
Tiny
MYA PHILLIPS-DAVIS
  • MEMBER
If you would like to take a listen to my car you may view my video here. https://youtu.be/kdjbFPAoA8U
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Friday, May 5th, 2017 AT 6:53 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
I am using a new laptop that is a real pile. Among its numerous design flaws, it does not play sound from the internet.

If you can hear the noise while standing beside the car, it is not related to the transmission, so that is a big worry eliminated. I do not know that it is necessary to tow the car. The types of things I would be looking for include an exhaust pipe that got pushed on by the hoist, or even a rubber exhaust hanger that was real close to breaking anyway, and the hoist moving on it was the final blow. That can let the whole system hang a little lower, and that can open up the flexible joint I mentioned. The clue is the noise will get louder when you press the accelerator pedal to speed up the engine, and that will be worse if you do that while holding the brakes applied. If nothing else works out, have the car inspected at a tire and alignment shop. The people there are experts at finding the causes of noises and vibrations, as well as poor tire wear. Specific to this issue is the need to determine if you are hearing a noise that is not normal for this model, meaning something is wrong or broken, or if you're hearing a noise too easily that is otherwise characteristic for your model, meaning something is mispositioned or missing. Be aware too that exhaust parts are suspended on rubber hangers to isolate the noise and vibration from the passenger compartment. It does not take much to allow two metal parts of a bracket to rub against each other. You'd be amazed at how much noise that can produce that is not heard outside the car.

Given the age of the car, metal fatigue can also play a role in how quiet it is inside. Regular hoists raise the car by its designed-in lifting points, and those are different than when the tires and suspension system hold the car up. It is not unheard of for the body to flex to the point a door weatherstrip seal leaves a gap. That will allow you to hear road noise which can be very noticeable. The body will usually settle back to where it was, but sometimes not right away. Also, GM engines are well-known to be noisy, especially their four-cylinder engines. A lot of effort went into adding noise-deadening materials. If any of that becomes non-functional, you'll hear the same noise a lot of other drivers hear. That includes the rubber seal that runs along the bottom of the rear edge of the hood.

I have to add one comment of value. I taught over one hundred students in a community college automotive program. Three of my top people were girls, and the guys had a lot of respect for them. A real lot of men today are just as clueless about the machines they trust are going to get them back home, and when you talk with the service writers behind the customer counter, they do not know where you fit on that scale of automotive wisdom. Some of those service writers are washed-out mechanic wanted-to-be's, but could not make it. My last supervisor at school was a woman who was a former service manager at a new-car dealership, and she was real good at her job. Also, during my ten years working at a real nice family-owned Chrysler dealership, I got to attend a lot of their schools, and they used my classroom as one of their three remote training locations, so I got to sit in on those too after I started teaching. The head of all of Chrysler training for all of Wisconsin and part of Michigan was a woman, and her classes were some of the best I have ever attended. So, you are welcome to be a woman, but you cannot assume anything about anyone when it comes to cars today. What you need to work toward is finding a shop or mechanic you feel comfortable with, then build a relationship with them. Any shop is better able to address your concerns when they know the history of your car. We had a real lot of regular, repeat customers at the dealership, and I often saw the same cars over and over for all of their regular maintenance. We got to know what types of things the owners would want to be told about, and what we could safely ignore. We have about a dozen new-car dealers in my city with the same excellent reputation. There is only one Chevrolet dealer that is a well-known crook. We used to have one really bad independent shop owner, but he ran out of customers and is no longer in business.

Keep my informed as to your progress or if you need more words of wisdom!
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Friday, May 5th, 2017 AT 8:49 PM
Tiny
MYA PHILLIPS-DAVIS
  • MEMBER
I let my dad drive the car and he instantly said "you have bad tires". I got four brand new tires back in December 2016 from Walmart and I looked at the tires today and they are Douglas tires. After seeing this I searched for Douglas tire reviews and read many negative things on this brand of tires including how the threads wear out fast, they go flat fast, and even are loud causing air plane sound. I had the Douglas brand tires taken off and put some old ones on just to see if the noise continued but it was completely gone! Guess its safe to say the Douglas tires were my problem here! I am going and get new tires tomorrow but not from Walmart! Thanks for your help!
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Saturday, May 6th, 2017 AT 1:58 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Dandy. Tires usually make noise as a result of bad wear patterns caused by misalignment problems, but there are exceptions. I worked at a Sears Auto Center in the 1980's, and we also had tires that were not suitable for specific applications. For example, we had a really nice tire made by Armstrong, but they could not be used by mailmen who drove all day on granite roads. The granite tore up the tread and cut the life expectancy in half. We also had a couple of tire models designed to provide a real quiet ride, but they were expensive. There are always trade-offs between cost, quiet, tread life, traction, and comfort.

At any rate, happy to hear your issue is going to be solved. Come back and see us again when I can impart some more of my wondrous wisdom onto you.
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Saturday, May 6th, 2017 AT 7:28 PM

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