1998 Cadillac Deville Overheating

Tiny
WLBICHAY
  • MEMBER
  • 1998 CADILLAC DEVILLE
  • V8
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 145,000 MILES
Vehicle overheats after it is driven for a while. What could be the main problem and if it is reasonable in terms of repairs costs.
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Tuesday, July 27th, 2010 AT 6:41 PM

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Tiny
FACTORYJACK
  • EXPERT
Could be low on coolant, that would be the most inexpensive. Before I spent any money to address it, I would strongly recommend the cooling system be checked for the presence of combustion gases. This would indicate an internal leak, and could bein the range of $3000 or more to fix properly.
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Wednesday, July 28th, 2010 AT 12:15 AM
Tiny
WLBICHAY
  • MEMBER
Engine Cooling problem
1998 Cadillac Deville V8 Front Wheel Drive Automatic 145000 miles

Q. Vehicle overheats after it is driven for a while. What could be the main problem and if it is reasonable in terms of repairs costs.

R. Could be low on coolant, that would be the most inexpensive. Before I spent any money to address it, I would strongly recommend the cooling system be checked for the presence of combustion gases. This would indicate an internal leak, and could be in the range of $3000 or more to fix properly.

Q. Would "Steel Seal" product work to fix such a problem?
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Wednesday, July 28th, 2010 AT 8:44 AM
Tiny
FACTORYJACK
  • EXPERT
In my honest opinion, I am not real supportive of additives, but I am in the repair business. Will it work, I don't know. I have never had any experience with anyone who has used it.

I will give you this scenario. Assuming that it has an internal leak, the cause is aluminum thread failure in the head bolt holes. Could be one, two, or several, on one or both banks. A sealant is possibly going to help the current leak, but will not restore the retention(clamping) of the stripped hole. What is likely to happen, is holes around the stripped one are going to fail, as they are more relied upon to sustain the load. This comes from heating and cooling, expansion and contraction.
A lot of the reason I don't support additives, especially in the cooling system, is this. You add it to a tank, with not alot of turbulent water flow. The heavier portion of the substance is likely to settle to the bottom. If in fact it does make it main stream, is the leak bad enough that it is going to seek and plug it? I have seen more of the sealants trapped in the bottom of radiator tanks, and blocks. It could lead to increased cooling system temperatures, and a higher potential for overheat.

The assumption that you have an internal leak is just that at this point. You would need to have it tested to confirm. A block test is best done with a gas analyzer, like the one used for emissions testing. Roadtest the vehicle until warm, have the gas analyzer at the filler when the cap is removed. Any reading over 100 PPM hydrocarbons indicates a cause for concern. As far as Steel Seal, on a consumer basis you could give it a try. If money, or repair costs exceeding the value of the vehicle are a concern, it is your best option.
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Wednesday, July 28th, 2010 AT 11:26 PM

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