Leaking coolant

Tiny
KOJAK223
  • MEMBER
  • 1995 CHRYSLER CIRRUS
  • 2.4L
  • 6 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 106,023 MILES
I am noticing coolant leaking from the driver's rear engine compartment. I looked at the coolant hoses and see no leaks coming from them. Can anybody help me?
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Thursday, May 11th, 2017 AT 10:15 AM

8 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
I can't think of anything on the driver's side that has coolant in it. You might consider adding a small bottle of dark purple dye to the coolant, then check a day later with a black light. The dye will show up as a bright yellow stain that you can follow back to the source. Auto parts stores will have the dye, and those that rent or borrow tools should have a black light.

Also look for a 4"-long rubber hose with a 90 degree bend in it hanging down from the passenger side of the firewall. If coolant is dripping from that, the heater core is leaking.
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Thursday, May 11th, 2017 AT 7:28 PM
Tiny
KOJAK223
  • MEMBER
Thanks for the tip. I saw a leak coming from a hose on the driver's side. Before I could get home my car heated up but not to the point where the needle was on red or the light came on. After the car cooled I JB welded the leak but when I put some water in the system to see if it was fixed the was a leak from the passenger side now! It was no longer a drip but running water. I thought it was the water pump so I jacked up the car and now the leak started from the other side. I don't think it is the head gasket (or I hope it isn't). Could it be the inlet pipe that connects the water pump to the coolant manifold?
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Wednesday, May 31st, 2017 AT 6:01 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
You listed a 2.4L engine, and a V-6. The 2.4L is a four-cylinder, and the V-6 is a 2.5L. They are very different. If you have the 2.5L, there is a tube that runs under the intake manifold from the back of the water pump housing to the driver's side where the hose attaches. The water pump is the suspect. The coolant will pool in the middle of the engine, then run out on whichever side is lower. That's why it changes when you raise one side of the car.
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Wednesday, May 31st, 2017 AT 11:52 PM
Tiny
KOJAK223
  • MEMBER
Sorry for the confusion. I was wondering about the inlet pipe being damaged as well since when I jack up the passenger side the leak starts on the driver side.
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Thursday, June 1st, 2017 AT 7:28 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Go back to my previous reply. That, and your observation, pertains to the 2.5L. I've had the same issue with my '88 Grand Caravan with the 3.0L engine. I thought it was a leaking pipe, but those were made of stainless steel. I replaced it, but it turned out to be the water pump. I've seen that before at the dealership, but somehow I guess I thought leaking water pumps didn't apply to me, especially when the engine only had 420,000 miles on it.

Sorry I didn't get back to you sooner. My entire e-mail system was dead last night.
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Saturday, June 3rd, 2017 AT 4:52 PM
Tiny
KOJAK223
  • MEMBER
Thanks for the help. By the way I am about to remove the bolt from the pulley and was wondering is it was standard or reverse direction. Does is loosen via counter clockwise?
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Wednesday, June 14th, 2017 AT 8:14 PM
Tiny
KOJAK223
  • MEMBER
Never mind I took the pulley off. The one thing I noticed is that the front cam moved by 4 clicks. Guess that means that I'll need to do the timing as well.
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Thursday, June 15th, 2017 AT 8:58 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Do you mean the timing belt jumped four teeth? That can happen if the belt becomes loose, and that can be caused by a bad tensioner or by worn bearings in the water pump. Bad bearings in the water pump will let it leak too.

Be careful with the timing belt. This is an interference engine and the valves can be damaged if the belt is not on right. A safe way to install the belt is to back the crankshaft up about 1/8th revolution to insure no piston is at top dead center. Place the camshafts on their marks, then bring the crank up to its mark. Once you have the belt on and under proper tension, rotate the crank two full revolutions on the normal direction, by hand. It will get harder to turn each time a piston comes up on its compression stroke, but if you wait a few seconds, the pressure will leak out, then the crank will be easy to turn again. If you feel something bang to a stop, don't force it. That only happens when the belt is not on right.
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Thursday, June 15th, 2017 AT 10:31 PM

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